2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152747
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Safe Practice by Assessing Critical Thinking
Abstract:
Building Safe Practice by Assessing Critical Thinking
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Wendt, Anne, PhD, RN, CAE
P.I. Institution Name:National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc
Title:NCLEX Content Manager
Co-Authors:Lorraine Kenny, MS, RN
Objective: Nurses must be able to use higher cognitive processing--to provide more efficient care and to better serve patient populations. Study objective is to identify if alternate item formats are assessing higher levels of cognitive processing, as compared to matched multiple-choice items (MCQs). Design: This study uses a non-experimental qualitative method based on talk-aloud protocols and an opinion survey. Population: Population was a purposeful sample of graduate nurses in their initial year of practice, determined through telephone interview to include ethnically diverse male and female participants. Variable(s): The outcome variables were level of cognitive processing used to answer items and opinions regarding alternate item formats versus MCQs. Methods: Participants were asked to talk out loud while answering items and their talking was tape recorded and then transcribed. An analysis of nurse experts’ rating the talk alouds was conducted using the multifaceted Rasch measurement model (FACETS), providing indications of the consistency of raters and the reliability of items to separate the people. Findings: Results show that the raters and items are reliably separating the participants. Survey results revealed that for all item types, 79% of the participants agreed or strongly agreed that the items using alternate formats were more realistic and allowed them to demonstrate their competence better than MCQs. Conclusions: Some alternate item formats require more complex cognitive processing than a paired MCQ and allow assessment of competencies not currently being assessed. An unanticipated confounding variable was the difficulty of the item and the level of knowledge of the participant. Implications: Assessment of critical thinking skills on the licensure examination indicates this aspect of entry-level nursing has been assessed. Upon identifying the ability to test higher cognitive processes, it would be incumbent upon educational programs to encourage nursing students to further develop this ability and translate it into practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Safe Practice by Assessing Critical Thinkingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152747-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Building Safe Practice by Assessing Critical Thinking</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wendt, Anne, PhD, RN, CAE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">NCLEX Content Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lkenny@ncsbn.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lorraine Kenny, MS, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Nurses must be able to use higher cognitive processing--to provide more efficient care and to better serve patient populations. Study objective is to identify if alternate item formats are assessing higher levels of cognitive processing, as compared to matched multiple-choice items (MCQs). Design: This study uses a non-experimental qualitative method based on talk-aloud protocols and an opinion survey. Population: Population was a purposeful sample of graduate nurses in their initial year of practice, determined through telephone interview to include ethnically diverse male and female participants. Variable(s): The outcome variables were level of cognitive processing used to answer items and opinions regarding alternate item formats versus MCQs. Methods: Participants were asked to talk out loud while answering items and their talking was tape recorded and then transcribed. An analysis of nurse experts&rsquo; rating the talk alouds was conducted using the multifaceted Rasch measurement model (FACETS), providing indications of the consistency of raters and the reliability of items to separate the people. Findings: Results show that the raters and items are reliably separating the participants. Survey results revealed that for all item types, 79% of the participants agreed or strongly agreed that the items using alternate formats were more realistic and allowed them to demonstrate their competence better than MCQs. Conclusions: Some alternate item formats require more complex cognitive processing than a paired MCQ and allow assessment of competencies not currently being assessed. An unanticipated confounding variable was the difficulty of the item and the level of knowledge of the participant. Implications: Assessment of critical thinking skills on the licensure examination indicates this aspect of entry-level nursing has been assessed. Upon identifying the ability to test higher cognitive processes, it would be incumbent upon educational programs to encourage nursing students to further develop this ability and translate it into practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:48:16Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:48:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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