Describing Independent Nursing Actions That Promote Partnering With Lay Caregivers in Cooperative Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152752
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Describing Independent Nursing Actions That Promote Partnering With Lay Caregivers in Cooperative Care
Abstract:
Describing Independent Nursing Actions That Promote Partnering With Lay Caregivers in Cooperative Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Wilson, Margaret E., PhD, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:June Eilers, PhD, RN; Judith Heermann, PhD, RN; Susan E. Knutson, MSN, RN
Objective: To identify and describe independent nursing actions in Cooperative Care, an innovative acute care delivery model. Design: Qualitative, descriptive, inductive study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The entire population of Cooperative Care nurses (n=12) participated in the study. The setting was the Lied Transplant Cooperative Care Center, The Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska where lay carepartners assume responsibility for acute care of the transplant recipient in partnership with nurses. Data were collected in 2003. Concept or Variables Studied: Independent nursing actions in Cooperative Care. Methods: Data were collected via two focus groups, 59 narrative logs from 12 shifts dictated by participants immediately following episodes of care and 3 follow-up interviews. Data were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis. Findings: Independent nursing actions included Fostering partnership, Teaching/coaching, Monitoring, Managing signs and symptoms, Coordinating, Providing psychosocial support, and Rescuing. A continuum of cognitive processing provided a backdrop for the categories of independent nursing actions. In the model, movement along the continuum from supporting decisions to problem solving was based on needs of the dyad. Conclusions: Nurses integrated specialized knowledge and expertise while dynamically using a continuum of cognitive processing to provide care. An active partnership between nurses and the recipient/carepartner dyad was essential for optimum outcomes. Cooperative Care is an example of apprenticeship or guided participation in which a community of experts (nurses) guide, support, and challenge novices (lay individuals) to participate in skilled activities until the responsibility for the activity can be transferred to the novice. Implications: Cooperative Care independent nursing actions identified in this study are the first step in formulating an instrument to measure doses of nursing actions in Cooperative Care. Such an instrument is needed to evaluate interventions designed to prepare and support lay carepartners.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDescribing Independent Nursing Actions That Promote Partnering With Lay Caregivers in Cooperative Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152752-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Describing Independent Nursing Actions That Promote Partnering With Lay Caregivers in Cooperative Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilson, Margaret E., PhD, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mwilson@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">June Eilers, PhD, RN; Judith Heermann, PhD, RN; Susan E. Knutson, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To identify and describe independent nursing actions in Cooperative Care, an innovative acute care delivery model. Design: Qualitative, descriptive, inductive study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The entire population of Cooperative Care nurses (n=12) participated in the study. The setting was the Lied Transplant Cooperative Care Center, The Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska where lay carepartners assume responsibility for acute care of the transplant recipient in partnership with nurses. Data were collected in 2003. Concept or Variables Studied: Independent nursing actions in Cooperative Care. Methods: Data were collected via two focus groups, 59 narrative logs from 12 shifts dictated by participants immediately following episodes of care and 3 follow-up interviews. Data were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis. Findings: Independent nursing actions included Fostering partnership, Teaching/coaching, Monitoring, Managing signs and symptoms, Coordinating, Providing psychosocial support, and Rescuing. A continuum of cognitive processing provided a backdrop for the categories of independent nursing actions. In the model, movement along the continuum from supporting decisions to problem solving was based on needs of the dyad. Conclusions: Nurses integrated specialized knowledge and expertise while dynamically using a continuum of cognitive processing to provide care. An active partnership between nurses and the recipient/carepartner dyad was essential for optimum outcomes. Cooperative Care is an example of apprenticeship or guided participation in which a community of experts (nurses) guide, support, and challenge novices (lay individuals) to participate in skilled activities until the responsibility for the activity can be transferred to the novice. Implications: Cooperative Care independent nursing actions identified in this study are the first step in formulating an instrument to measure doses of nursing actions in Cooperative Care. Such an instrument is needed to evaluate interventions designed to prepare and support lay carepartners.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:48:27Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:48:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.