Social Support, Life Stress, and Anxiety as Predictors of Pregnancy Complications of Low-Income Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152754
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Support, Life Stress, and Anxiety as Predictors of Pregnancy Complications of Low-Income Women
Abstract:
Social Support, Life Stress, and Anxiety as Predictors of Pregnancy Complications of Low-Income Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Zachariah, Rachel, RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Northeastern University
Title:Associate Professor
The purpose of this research was to examine relationships between the adverse outcomes of pregnancy and the modifiable psychosocial risk factors in low-income women. The specific aims were to examine: (1) the relative strength of attachments with mother/surrogate and husband (partner), social support, life stress, and anxiety as predictors of psychological well-being; (2) the impact of psychosocial variables and psychological well-being on pregnancy outcomes. A convenience sample of medically low-risk women 18 through 35 years of age, Medicaid eligible, between 14 and 22 weeks of pregnancy, and fluent in English, was recruited. Self-report questionnaires to measure attachments, social support, life stress, anxiety, and psychological well-being were administered individually between 14 and 22 weeks, and between 32 and 42 weeks of pregnancy. Time I questionnaires were completed by 111 subjects, and Time II questionnaires were completed by 31 subjects. The hospital records of the participants were reviewed to determine pregnancy, labor, delivery, and newborn complications. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, correlation, multiple regression, paired t-tests, and discriminant analyses. Discriminate analysis was performed to assess the relative contribution of independent variables at Time I to predict newborn complications. The Time I measures significantly classified the Newborn complications in this study (Wilks’ Lambda=.792 Chi-square=17.09 df=7 p=.017). The most important discriminating factors were negative life events and the interaction of emotional support with negative life events. An additional discriminate analysis was performed to assess the relative contribution of independent variables at Time I to predict pregnancy complications. These Time I measures significantly classified the complications of pregnancy (Wilks’ Lambda=.816 Chi-square=14.77 df=7 =.039). The most important discriminating factors were state anxiety and total functional social supports. In summary, social support, stress, and anxiety are significant factors in preventing adverse outcomes of pregnancy for low-income women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Support, Life Stress, and Anxiety as Predictors of Pregnancy Complications of Low-Income Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152754-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Social Support, Life Stress, and Anxiety as Predictors of Pregnancy Complications of Low-Income Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zachariah, Rachel, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northeastern University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">r.zachariah@neu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this research was to examine relationships between the adverse outcomes of pregnancy and the modifiable psychosocial risk factors in low-income women. The specific aims were to examine: (1) the relative strength of attachments with mother/surrogate and husband (partner), social support, life stress, and anxiety as predictors of psychological well-being; (2) the impact of psychosocial variables and psychological well-being on pregnancy outcomes. A convenience sample of medically low-risk women 18 through 35 years of age, Medicaid eligible, between 14 and 22 weeks of pregnancy, and fluent in English, was recruited. Self-report questionnaires to measure attachments, social support, life stress, anxiety, and psychological well-being were administered individually between 14 and 22 weeks, and between 32 and 42 weeks of pregnancy. Time I questionnaires were completed by 111 subjects, and Time II questionnaires were completed by 31 subjects. The hospital records of the participants were reviewed to determine pregnancy, labor, delivery, and newborn complications. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, correlation, multiple regression, paired t-tests, and discriminant analyses. Discriminate analysis was performed to assess the relative contribution of independent variables at Time I to predict newborn complications. The Time I measures significantly classified the Newborn complications in this study (Wilks&rsquo; Lambda=.792 Chi-square=17.09 df=7 p=.017). The most important discriminating factors were negative life events and the interaction of emotional support with negative life events. An additional discriminate analysis was performed to assess the relative contribution of independent variables at Time I to predict pregnancy complications. These Time I measures significantly classified the complications of pregnancy (Wilks&rsquo; Lambda=.816 Chi-square=14.77 df=7 =.039). The most important discriminating factors were state anxiety and total functional social supports. In summary, social support, stress, and anxiety are significant factors in preventing adverse outcomes of pregnancy for low-income women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:48:31Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:48:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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