2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152755
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community Mentor Roles in Advancing Student Nurse Professional Practice
Abstract:
Community Mentor Roles in Advancing Student Nurse Professional Practice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 21, 2004
Author:Adamson, Margaret, MA, PG, Dip, Ed, BA
P.I. Institution Name:Universal College of Learning (UCOL)
Title:Ms
Objective: The worldwide nursing shortage causes staffing problems for remote rural hospitals in New Zealand. A local Bachelor of Nursing programme was established to educate nurses who were likely to remain in the area. The Tairawhiti region is an isolated, low socio-economic, largely indigenous culture, rural area in New Zealand where distance rules out regular integration with our tertiary institute’s usual support networks. The research studies whether students would be assisted in making appropriate links to local health needs if mentored by local registered nurses throughout their educational journey. Design: A three year research programme commenced to follow the progress of a mentoring project through the three years of the BN programme and into the first year of practice. Students were introduced to possible mentors and independently given freedom to seek out a local mentor. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The research follows a class of thirty students. The mean age of the class is thirty-seven with all but three being female. Variables studied together: The research looks at who seeks mentors, at what time in their education and if these mentoring relationships last. A correlation between learning styles and choice of mentor is considered. Methods: This qualitative project uses storytelling interviews from a critical hermeneutical standpoint to explore mentoring. The use of focus groups allow a wider dialogue aimed at communicating insights about the topics back to the participants themselves in a reflective process which is critical and emancipatory in nature. Findings: This research remains in progress. There is emerging correlation between student learning styles and seeking a mentor. Those with a circular learning pattern appear to find a mentor more useful to their studies than the traditional academic support services. Students need continuing support to establish such a relationship. This cohort currently has high success and low attrition rates.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity Mentor Roles in Advancing Student Nurse Professional Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152755-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Community Mentor Roles in Advancing Student Nurse Professional Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 21, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Adamson, Margaret, MA, PG, Dip, Ed, BA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Universal College of Learning (UCOL)</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ms</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">m.adamson@ucol.ac.nz</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The worldwide nursing shortage causes staffing problems for remote rural hospitals in New Zealand. A local Bachelor of Nursing programme was established to educate nurses who were likely to remain in the area. The Tairawhiti region is an isolated, low socio-economic, largely indigenous culture, rural area in New Zealand where distance rules out regular integration with our tertiary institute&rsquo;s usual support networks. The research studies whether students would be assisted in making appropriate links to local health needs if mentored by local registered nurses throughout their educational journey. Design: A three year research programme commenced to follow the progress of a mentoring project through the three years of the BN programme and into the first year of practice. Students were introduced to possible mentors and independently given freedom to seek out a local mentor. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The research follows a class of thirty students. The mean age of the class is thirty-seven with all but three being female. Variables studied together: The research looks at who seeks mentors, at what time in their education and if these mentoring relationships last. A correlation between learning styles and choice of mentor is considered. Methods: This qualitative project uses storytelling interviews from a critical hermeneutical standpoint to explore mentoring. The use of focus groups allow a wider dialogue aimed at communicating insights about the topics back to the participants themselves in a reflective process which is critical and emancipatory in nature. Findings: This research remains in progress. There is emerging correlation between student learning styles and seeking a mentor. Those with a circular learning pattern appear to find a mentor more useful to their studies than the traditional academic support services. Students need continuing support to establish such a relationship. This cohort currently has high success and low attrition rates.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:48:34Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:48:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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