Practice-Based Knowledge Japanese Midwives Use in Assessing the Progress of Labor and Their Underlying Experiences

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152762
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Practice-Based Knowledge Japanese Midwives Use in Assessing the Progress of Labor and Their Underlying Experiences
Abstract:
Practice-Based Knowledge Japanese Midwives Use in Assessing the Progress of Labor and Their Underlying Experiences
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Masaoka, Keiko, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Sapporo Medical University
Title:Lecture
Co-Authors:Tomoko Maruyama PhD, Professor
Yoshiko Hayashi MA, Lecturer
Manami Yoshida MA, Assistant Professor
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] In order to identify practice-based knowledge acquired by midwives, ten midwives with up to ten years in midwifery (?younger group? 4.75 years in midwifery on average) and 21 midwives with a longer experience (?older group? 19.75 years) were asked to talk about memorable experiences between January 2008 and November 2009. Narratives were analyzed using Kelly?s method. This research had a prior approval of the Ethical Committee of Sapporo Medical University.

Nine categories of knowledge identified from the younger group include:- determining whether to wait in the prolonged delivery or not; visually estimating the bleeding and urination volume; assessing the need for episiotomy/avoiding perineum laceration; coping with sudden changes in condition of mother/baby; realizing grave responsibilities because ?every childbirth is unique and anything can happen?. Among the underlying experiences were building a relationship gradually; providing care to high risk cases; feedback, self-reflection and realizing limits of own ability/midwifery.

11 categories extracted from the older group include:- engaging with the woman discreetly, allowing her body to take its natural course; knowing one?s remit; assessing the fetal condition and the women?s states through visual inspection/ palpation; ?challenges where one?s accountability is at stake sharpen own ability to judge; and ?the full moon influences childbirth?. The underlying experiences include providing continuous care throughout pregnancy; staying with the woman during labor, allowing her to give birth her way where possible; arranging transfer to hospital; knowing one?s limit; training in palpation and inspection; learning from failures and others.

Those up to ten years in midwifery are expected to have acquired knowledge on how to deal with sudden changes in condition and provide case-specific care while realizing own responsibilities. Those with a longer experience are expected to have built the ability to detect problems, assess the woman?s inner feelings and do the best within own remit.

In order to identify practice-based knowledge acquired by midwives, ten midwives with up to ten years in midwifery (?younger group? 4.75 years in midwifery on average) and 21 midwives with a longer experience (?older group? 19.75 years) were asked to talk about memorable experiences between January 2008 and November 2009.  Narratives were analyzed using Kelly?s method.  This research had a prior approval of the Ethical Committee of Sapporo Medical University.
Nine categories of knowledge identified from the younger group include:- determining whether to wait in the prolonged delivery or not; visually estimating the bleeding and urination volume; assessing the need for episiotomy/avoiding perineum laceration; coping with sudden changes in condition of mother/baby; realizing grave responsibilities because ?every childbirth is unique and anything can happen?.  Among the underlying experiences were building a relationship gradually; providing care to high risk cases; feedback, self-reflection and realizing limits of own ability/midwifery.
11 categories extracted from the older group include:- engaging with the woman discreetly, allowing her body to take its natural course; knowing one?s remit; assessing the fetal condition and the women?s states through visual inspection/ palpation; ?challenges where one?s accountability is at stake sharpen own ability to judge; and ?the full moon influences childbirth?.  The underlying experiences include providing continuous care throughout pregnancy; staying with the woman during labor, allowing her to give birth her way where possible; arranging transfer to hospital; knowing one?s limit; training in palpation and inspection; learning from failures and others.
Those up to ten years in midwifery are expected to have acquired knowledge on how to deal with sudden changes in condition and provide case-specific care while realizing own responsibilities.  Those with a longer experience are expected to have built the ability to detect problems, assess the woman?s inner feelings and do the best within own remit.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePractice-Based Knowledge Japanese Midwives Use in Assessing the Progress of Labor and Their Underlying Experiencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152762-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Practice-Based Knowledge Japanese Midwives Use in Assessing the Progress of Labor and Their Underlying Experiences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Masaoka, Keiko, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Sapporo Medical University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecture</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">k.masaoka@sapmed.ac.jp</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tomoko Maruyama PhD, Professor<br/>Yoshiko Hayashi MA, Lecturer<br/>Manami Yoshida MA, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] In order to identify practice-based knowledge acquired by midwives, ten midwives with up to ten years in midwifery (?younger group? 4.75 years in midwifery on average) and 21 midwives with a longer experience (?older group? 19.75 years) were asked to talk about memorable experiences between January 2008 and November 2009. Narratives were analyzed using Kelly?s method. This research had a prior approval of the Ethical Committee of Sapporo Medical University. <br/><br/>Nine categories of knowledge identified from the younger group include:- determining whether to wait in the prolonged delivery or not; visually estimating the bleeding and urination volume; assessing the need for episiotomy/avoiding perineum laceration; coping with sudden changes in condition of mother/baby; realizing grave responsibilities because ?every childbirth is unique and anything can happen?. Among the underlying experiences were building a relationship gradually; providing care to high risk cases; feedback, self-reflection and realizing limits of own ability/midwifery. <br/><br/>11 categories extracted from the older group include:- engaging with the woman discreetly, allowing her body to take its natural course; knowing one?s remit; assessing the fetal condition and the women?s states through visual inspection/ palpation; ?challenges where one?s accountability is at stake sharpen own ability to judge; and ?the full moon influences childbirth?. The underlying experiences include providing continuous care throughout pregnancy; staying with the woman during labor, allowing her to give birth her way where possible; arranging transfer to hospital; knowing one?s limit; training in palpation and inspection; learning from failures and others. <br/><br/>Those up to ten years in midwifery are expected to have acquired knowledge on how to deal with sudden changes in condition and provide case-specific care while realizing own responsibilities. Those with a longer experience are expected to have built the ability to detect problems, assess the woman?s inner feelings and do the best within own remit. <br/><br/>In order to identify practice-based knowledge acquired by midwives, ten midwives with up to ten years in midwifery (?younger group? 4.75 years in midwifery on average) and 21 midwives with a longer experience (?older group? 19.75 years) were asked to talk about memorable experiences between January 2008 and November 2009.&nbsp; Narratives were analyzed using Kelly?s method.&nbsp; This research had a prior approval of the Ethical Committee of Sapporo Medical University. <br/>Nine categories of knowledge identified from the younger group include:- determining whether to wait in the prolonged delivery or not; visually estimating the bleeding and urination volume; assessing the need for episiotomy/avoiding perineum laceration; coping with sudden changes in condition of mother/baby; realizing grave responsibilities because ?every childbirth is unique and anything can happen?.&nbsp; Among the underlying experiences were building a relationship gradually; providing care to high risk cases; feedback, self-reflection and realizing limits of own ability/midwifery. <br/>11 categories extracted from the older group include:- engaging with the woman discreetly, allowing her body to take its natural course; knowing one?s remit; assessing the fetal condition and the women?s states through visual inspection/ palpation; ?challenges where one?s accountability is at stake sharpen own ability to judge; and ?the full moon influences childbirth?.&nbsp; The underlying experiences include providing continuous care throughout pregnancy; staying with the woman during labor, allowing her to give birth her way where possible; arranging transfer to hospital; knowing one?s limit; training in palpation and inspection; learning from failures and others. <br/>Those up to ten years in midwifery are expected to have acquired knowledge on how to deal with sudden changes in condition and provide case-specific care while realizing own responsibilities.&nbsp; Those with a longer experience are expected to have built the ability to detect problems, assess the woman?s inner feelings and do the best within own remit.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:48:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:48:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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