Pressure sore prevention self-efficacy and outcome expectations in the spinal cord injured: A validity and reliability study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152798
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pressure sore prevention self-efficacy and outcome expectations in the spinal cord injured: A validity and reliability study
Abstract:
Pressure sore prevention self-efficacy and outcome expectations in the spinal cord injured: A validity and reliability study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:May 19 - 22, 1992
Author:Basta, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati, AHEC Program
Title:Nursing and Health Education Coordinator
The purposes of this study were to (a) develop and test a

paper-and-pencil tool (known as the Pressure Sore Prevention

Beliefs Scale, or PSPBS) to assess spinal cord-injured persons'

(SCIPs) confidence levels (or self-efficacy) in independently

performing various pressure sore prevention (PSP) behaviors and the

extent to which they believed that these behaviors were necessary

for maintaining healthy skin (outcome expectations); (b) determine

the reliability and validity of the PSPBS; and (c) examine the

relationships between subjects' scores on the PSPBS and selected

demographic and clinical characteristics. Bandura's self-efficacy

theory was used to guide the study design, which was both

methodological and descriptive/correlational.



The PSPBS was tested with a convenience sample of 40 SCIPs from

seven midwestern/Great Lakes rehabilitation facilities who were

within 14 days before discharge from their initial inpatient

programs. Data collection occurred between June 1990 and August

1991.



Internal consistency reliability estimates for the PSP

Self-efficacy and Outcome Expectation subscales of the PSPBS were

.899 and .878, respectively. Content validity as determined by a

panel of rehabilitation clinical nurse specialists and eight

persons with long-term spinal cord injuries was found to be very

satisfactory.



Subjects (on the average) tended to be less confident in their

abilities to check skin with a mirror; differentiate between a

normal skin response to pressure and signs of early skin damage;

avoid tobacco use; and perform transfers safely. Behaviors which

were viewed by subjects to be less than very necessary for healthy

skin were wearing clothes that do not cause excess sweating; eating

a balanced diet; avoiding tobacco; and keeping oneself from sliding

down while sitting up in bed. Performance on the PSP Outcome

Expectation subscale of the PSPBS was significantly related to age

(r = .506), p< .05 and to marital status (phi= .373), X2 (1, N= 40)

5.560, p< .05.



Based upon its testing in this study, the Pressure Sore Prevention

Beliefs Scale was judged to be a reliable, content valid, and

suitable tool for assessing perceptions of PSP self-efficacy and

outcome expectations with spinal cord-injured persons. Additional

studies with larger samples are needed, however, to provide more

evidence of the PSPBS's construct and criterion-related validity.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
19-May-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePressure sore prevention self-efficacy and outcome expectations in the spinal cord injured: A validity and reliability studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152798-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pressure sore prevention self-efficacy and outcome expectations in the spinal cord injured: A validity and reliability study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">May 19 - 22, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Basta, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati, AHEC Program</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing and Health Education Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bast102w@cdc.gov</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purposes of this study were to (a) develop and test a<br/><br/>paper-and-pencil tool (known as the Pressure Sore Prevention<br/><br/>Beliefs Scale, or PSPBS) to assess spinal cord-injured persons'<br/><br/>(SCIPs) confidence levels (or self-efficacy) in independently<br/><br/>performing various pressure sore prevention (PSP) behaviors and the<br/><br/>extent to which they believed that these behaviors were necessary<br/><br/>for maintaining healthy skin (outcome expectations); (b) determine<br/><br/>the reliability and validity of the PSPBS; and (c) examine the<br/><br/>relationships between subjects' scores on the PSPBS and selected<br/><br/>demographic and clinical characteristics. Bandura's self-efficacy<br/><br/>theory was used to guide the study design, which was both<br/><br/>methodological and descriptive/correlational.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The PSPBS was tested with a convenience sample of 40 SCIPs from<br/><br/>seven midwestern/Great Lakes rehabilitation facilities who were<br/><br/>within 14 days before discharge from their initial inpatient<br/><br/>programs. Data collection occurred between June 1990 and August<br/><br/>1991.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Internal consistency reliability estimates for the PSP<br/><br/>Self-efficacy and Outcome Expectation subscales of the PSPBS were<br/><br/>.899 and .878, respectively. Content validity as determined by a<br/><br/>panel of rehabilitation clinical nurse specialists and eight<br/><br/>persons with long-term spinal cord injuries was found to be very<br/><br/>satisfactory.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Subjects (on the average) tended to be less confident in their<br/><br/>abilities to check skin with a mirror; differentiate between a<br/><br/>normal skin response to pressure and signs of early skin damage;<br/><br/>avoid tobacco use; and perform transfers safely. Behaviors which<br/><br/>were viewed by subjects to be less than very necessary for healthy<br/><br/>skin were wearing clothes that do not cause excess sweating; eating<br/><br/>a balanced diet; avoiding tobacco; and keeping oneself from sliding<br/><br/>down while sitting up in bed. Performance on the PSP Outcome<br/><br/>Expectation subscale of the PSPBS was significantly related to age<br/><br/>(r = .506), p&lt; .05 and to marital status (phi= .373), X2 (1, N= 40)<br/><br/>5.560, p&lt; .05.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Based upon its testing in this study, the Pressure Sore Prevention<br/><br/>Beliefs Scale was judged to be a reliable, content valid, and<br/><br/>suitable tool for assessing perceptions of PSP self-efficacy and<br/><br/>outcome expectations with spinal cord-injured persons. Additional<br/><br/>studies with larger samples are needed, however, to provide more<br/><br/>evidence of the PSPBS's construct and criterion-related validity.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:50:14Z-
dc.date.issued1992-05-19en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:50:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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