2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152801
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Types and sources of social support for nurses caring for HIV+ patients
Abstract:
Types and sources of social support for nurses caring for HIV+ patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Raffin, Roxane, MS/MSc
P.I. Institution Name:LAC and USC Medical Center, General Hospital Room 11431
Title:Assistant Nursing Director
Although the positive effects of social support are well known,

specific guidelines are lacking for the development and

implementation of intervention programs based on this concept.

This lack of information to guide intervention efforts is felt most

acutely when attempting to design effective social support programs

for nurses coping with the stress of caring for HIV+ patients. The

primary question is: What kind of social support do these nurses

need, from whom, and under what circumstances? This paper presents

the social support-related results of a needs assessment survey

conducted in a large tertiary care hospital. The following types

of stressors associated with caring for HIV+ patients emerged:

fear of contagion, felt emotional turmoil in dealing with AIDS

patients' inevitable mortality, and the crisis of a blood or body

fluid exposure. Results also indicated that the most effective

source of social support is a trusted nursing colleague who also

possesses clinical expertise in AIDS nursing care. Both of these

characteristics need to be present in the helping person for the

support to be sought out and effective. A number of possible

explanations for these results are presented that are consistent

with extant models of effective social support. Implications for

future nursing research are drawn.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTypes and sources of social support for nurses caring for HIV+ patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152801-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Types and sources of social support for nurses caring for HIV+ patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Raffin, Roxane, MS/MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">LAC and USC Medical Center, General Hospital Room 11431</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Nursing Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although the positive effects of social support are well known,<br/><br/>specific guidelines are lacking for the development and<br/><br/>implementation of intervention programs based on this concept.<br/><br/>This lack of information to guide intervention efforts is felt most<br/><br/>acutely when attempting to design effective social support programs<br/><br/>for nurses coping with the stress of caring for HIV+ patients. The<br/><br/>primary question is: What kind of social support do these nurses<br/><br/>need, from whom, and under what circumstances? This paper presents<br/><br/>the social support-related results of a needs assessment survey<br/><br/>conducted in a large tertiary care hospital. The following types<br/><br/>of stressors associated with caring for HIV+ patients emerged:<br/><br/>fear of contagion, felt emotional turmoil in dealing with AIDS<br/><br/>patients' inevitable mortality, and the crisis of a blood or body<br/><br/>fluid exposure. Results also indicated that the most effective<br/><br/>source of social support is a trusted nursing colleague who also<br/><br/>possesses clinical expertise in AIDS nursing care. Both of these<br/><br/>characteristics need to be present in the helping person for the<br/><br/>support to be sought out and effective. A number of possible<br/><br/>explanations for these results are presented that are consistent<br/><br/>with extant models of effective social support. Implications for<br/><br/>future nursing research are drawn.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:50:22Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:50:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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