Evaluation of an Innovative New Graduate Transition Program: Social and Professional Reality Integration for Nurse Graduates (SPRING)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152802
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of an Innovative New Graduate Transition Program: Social and Professional Reality Integration for Nurse Graduates (SPRING)
Abstract:
Evaluation of an Innovative New Graduate Transition Program: Social and Professional Reality Integration for Nurse Graduates (SPRING)
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Newhouse, Robin Purdy, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The Johns Hopkins Hospital/University School of Nursing
Title:Nurse Researcher/Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Janice J. Hoffman, RN, MSN
Objectives: To evaluate implementation of a new nurse graduate program, Social and Professional Reality Integration of Nurse Graduates (SPRING). Design: Quasi-experimental and qualitative Population, Setting, Sample, Year: New graduates hired June 2001 - October 2003 at a large academic hospital. Concepts/Variables:Nurse recruitment and retention, organizational commitment, sense of belonging, anticipated turnover, and process evaluation. Methods:Recruitment and retention data collected. Instruments included Organizational Commitment, Sense of Belonging, and Anticipated Turnover Scale for baseline measures (new graduates hired in 2001), and intervention measures (new graduates in SPRING at 6 months and 1 year). Qualitative data collected through evaluations and focus groups. Findings: Preliminary results indicate increased recruitment of nurse graduates (44%), but no significant differences in total scores on survey instruments. Item analysis yielded few differences [decision to work for this organization higher at 6 months (F = 3.411, df 2, 192, p=0.35), feeling that time in position was sufficient was lower at 6 months than baseline or 12 months (p=.019 at 6 months and p = .04 at 12 months), more important to fit within organization at 6 months after hire higher than baseline (p=.010), but not at 12 months (F = 3.623, df = 2, 194, p = .026)]. Focus groups and evaluations yielded areas of SPRING program requiring further evaluation. Conclusions: Development and implementation of a structured program to integrate nurse graduates into the organization demonstrated increases in recruitment, but little significant differences in selected concepts. Although means indicate positive program outcomes, this analysis lacks sufficient power to determine a difference. Additional data collection and new measures are needed that better measure program impact. Implications: Identifying strategies that decrease attrition and enhance organizational commitment and sense of belonging are important to create professional nursing environments. More research is needed to determine the effect of new strategies on new graduate transition.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of an Innovative New Graduate Transition Program: Social and Professional Reality Integration for Nurse Graduates (SPRING)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152802-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of an Innovative New Graduate Transition Program: Social and Professional Reality Integration for Nurse Graduates (SPRING)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Newhouse, Robin Purdy, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Johns Hopkins Hospital/University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Researcher/Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rnewhou1@jhmi.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Janice J. Hoffman, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: To evaluate implementation of a new nurse graduate program, Social and Professional Reality Integration of Nurse Graduates (SPRING). Design: Quasi-experimental and qualitative Population, Setting, Sample, Year: New graduates hired June 2001 - October 2003 at a large academic hospital. Concepts/Variables:Nurse recruitment and retention, organizational commitment, sense of belonging, anticipated turnover, and process evaluation. Methods:Recruitment and retention data collected. Instruments included Organizational Commitment, Sense of Belonging, and Anticipated Turnover Scale for baseline measures (new graduates hired in 2001), and intervention measures (new graduates in SPRING at 6 months and 1 year). Qualitative data collected through evaluations and focus groups. Findings: Preliminary results indicate increased recruitment of nurse graduates (44%), but no significant differences in total scores on survey instruments. Item analysis yielded few differences [decision to work for this organization higher at 6 months (F = 3.411, df 2, 192, p=0.35), feeling that time in position was sufficient was lower at 6 months than baseline or 12 months (p=.019 at 6 months and p = .04 at 12 months), more important to fit within organization at 6 months after hire higher than baseline (p=.010), but not at 12 months (F = 3.623, df = 2, 194, p = .026)]. Focus groups and evaluations yielded areas of SPRING program requiring further evaluation. Conclusions: Development and implementation of a structured program to integrate nurse graduates into the organization demonstrated increases in recruitment, but little significant differences in selected concepts. Although means indicate positive program outcomes, this analysis lacks sufficient power to determine a difference. Additional data collection and new measures are needed that better measure program impact. Implications: Identifying strategies that decrease attrition and enhance organizational commitment and sense of belonging are important to create professional nursing environments. More research is needed to determine the effect of new strategies on new graduate transition.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:50:24Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:50:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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