Evidence of Needle Anxiety in Children with Diabetes: Foundation for Developing Practice Guidelines

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152805
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence of Needle Anxiety in Children with Diabetes: Foundation for Developing Practice Guidelines
Abstract:
Evidence of Needle Anxiety in Children with Diabetes: Foundation for Developing Practice Guidelines
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lown, Kenneth J. A., RN, MSN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Title:RN, MSN, CPNP
Co-Authors:Carol Howe, RN, MSN; Alan Tuttle, MSW; Terri Lipman, PhD, CRNP, FAAN
Background: Needle anxiety has been shown to be a problem for children with diabetes and may contribute to omission of blood tests or insulin injections. Aims: To describe 1) parents? self report of their fear and distress with intrusive procedures; 2) children?s self report of pain with injections and fingersticks; 3) parents' use of distraction/relaxation techniques. Methods: Parents and children completed the Perceptions of Insulin Shots and Fingersticks Survey at diagnosis and at the first 3 clinic visits post discharge. The survey asks parents to rate their fear, distress, and their perception of child's pain, cooperation, verbal protest, physical protest for both injections and fingersticks on a visual analog scale (VAS). Children rated pain and fear for injections and fingersticks on a VAS or on Wong Baker Faces Scale (for <9 yr). Results: 23 parents and children aged 9.9 ± 3.5 yr (4.9-16.2 yr, 21 white, 2 AA) completed the survey.   Parents' and childrens' ratings of > 4 was used to indicate a problem that would warrant intervention.  26% of children < 9 yr reported fear of injections at diagnosis. Parents reported a high degree of fear with injections (44%) and fingersticks (21%) at diagnosis. Children?s pain, and parents? distress decreased over time, but at 6 mo., 9% of children still reported fear of injections, 13% of parents reported distress with administering injections and 17.3% of parents reported very poor cooperation with injections. Only 8.7% of parents were using distraction techniques at 6 mo. Conclusions: Needle anxiety is a significant problem for children with diabetes and their parents at diagnosis and persists over time.  When insulin or blood testing omission is suspected, an assessment of needle anxiety is essential.  In response to these data, we are developing a program of distraction techniques for all children with diabetes and their families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence of Needle Anxiety in Children with Diabetes: Foundation for Developing Practice Guidelinesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152805-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evidence of Needle Anxiety in Children with Diabetes: Foundation for Developing Practice Guidelines</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lown, Kenneth J. A., RN, MSN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">RN, MSN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lown@email.chop.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol Howe, RN, MSN; Alan Tuttle, MSW; Terri Lipman, PhD, CRNP, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Needle anxiety has been shown to be a problem for children with diabetes and may contribute to omission of blood tests or insulin injections. Aims: To describe 1) parents? self report of their fear and distress with intrusive procedures; 2) children?s self report of pain with injections and fingersticks; 3) parents' use of distraction/relaxation techniques. Methods: Parents and children completed the Perceptions of Insulin Shots and Fingersticks Survey at diagnosis and at the first 3 clinic visits post discharge. The survey asks parents to rate their fear, distress, and their perception of child's pain, cooperation, verbal protest, physical protest for both injections and fingersticks on a visual analog scale (VAS). Children rated pain and fear for injections and fingersticks on a VAS or on Wong Baker Faces Scale (for &lt;9 yr). Results: 23 parents and children aged 9.9 &plusmn; 3.5 yr (4.9-16.2 yr, 21 white, 2 AA) completed the survey.&nbsp; &nbsp;Parents' and childrens' ratings of &gt; 4 was used to indicate a problem that would warrant intervention.&nbsp; 26% of children &lt; 9 yr reported fear of injections at diagnosis. Parents reported a high degree of fear with injections (44%) and fingersticks (21%) at diagnosis. Children?s pain, and parents? distress decreased over time, but at 6 mo., 9% of children still reported fear of injections, 13% of parents reported distress with administering injections and 17.3% of parents reported very poor cooperation with injections. Only 8.7% of parents were using distraction techniques at 6 mo. Conclusions: Needle anxiety is a significant problem for children with diabetes and their parents at diagnosis and persists over time.&nbsp; When insulin or blood testing omission is suspected, an assessment of needle anxiety is essential.&nbsp; In response to these data, we are developing a program of distraction techniques for all children with diabetes and their families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:50:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:50:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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