Pregnant teenager's self reported reasons for seeking or not seeking prenatal care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152811
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pregnant teenager's self reported reasons for seeking or not seeking prenatal care
Abstract:
Pregnant teenager's self reported reasons for seeking or not seeking prenatal care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Cottrell, Barbara, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:School of Nursing B-151
Florida State University
Title:Associate Professor
Recent research has suggested that early and continuous prenatal

care is significantly related to positive outcomes for the teen

mother and her infant; however, there is a tendency for many

adolescent mothers to delay entry into prenatal care until the

second and sometimes even the third trimester of their pregnancies.

The purpose of this study was to compare the reasons that pregnant

teenagers do or do not seek prenatal care during the first

trimester of their pregnancy. The subjects, 49 adolescent girls

between 13 and 18 years old, were enrolled in prenatal care, 37

during the first trimester and 12 during the third trimester.

Pregnant teens who entered prenatal care between 14 and 28 weeks

were excluded from the study. Protection of human subjects

procedures were completed prior to data collection. Semi-structured

interview guides were used in audiotaped interviews of

approximately 30 minutes. The purpose of the interviews was to

elicit responses from pregnant teens regarding the timing of their

entry into prenatal care.



Reasons for seeking early care included feeling ill, being worried

about themselves and wanting a pregnancy test, and the subject's

mother insisting that she begin prenatal care. The results

suggested that family acceptance and support is a necessary

antecedent to seeking early prenatal care. Reasons for delaying

care included lack of knowledge of pregnancy symptoms, denying the

pregnancy, fear of parents response to the pregnancy, and lack of

financial resources. Since this is a large sample for qualitative

research, results could be used to suggest content regarding

recognition of pregnancy symptoms and the value of early prenatal

care in late elementary school including continued efforts to

enlist parental acceptance and support. Public service

announcements in the popular media could also help to accomplish

these goals. Implications for nursing practice include instruction

on pregnancy recognition and the importance of early prenatal care

in nursing and health care activities aimed at preadolescent,

adolescent, childbearing and childrearing women in order to

increase the likelihood that all pregnant females will enter

prenatal care during the first trimester of their pregnancies.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePregnant teenager's self reported reasons for seeking or not seeking prenatal careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152811-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pregnant teenager's self reported reasons for seeking or not seeking prenatal care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cottrell, Barbara, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing B-151<br/>Florida State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Recent research has suggested that early and continuous prenatal<br/><br/>care is significantly related to positive outcomes for the teen<br/><br/>mother and her infant; however, there is a tendency for many<br/><br/>adolescent mothers to delay entry into prenatal care until the<br/><br/>second and sometimes even the third trimester of their pregnancies.<br/><br/>The purpose of this study was to compare the reasons that pregnant<br/><br/>teenagers do or do not seek prenatal care during the first<br/><br/>trimester of their pregnancy. The subjects, 49 adolescent girls<br/><br/>between 13 and 18 years old, were enrolled in prenatal care, 37<br/><br/>during the first trimester and 12 during the third trimester.<br/><br/>Pregnant teens who entered prenatal care between 14 and 28 weeks<br/><br/>were excluded from the study. Protection of human subjects<br/><br/>procedures were completed prior to data collection. Semi-structured<br/><br/>interview guides were used in audiotaped interviews of<br/><br/>approximately 30 minutes. The purpose of the interviews was to<br/><br/>elicit responses from pregnant teens regarding the timing of their<br/><br/>entry into prenatal care.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Reasons for seeking early care included feeling ill, being worried<br/><br/>about themselves and wanting a pregnancy test, and the subject's<br/><br/>mother insisting that she begin prenatal care. The results<br/><br/>suggested that family acceptance and support is a necessary<br/><br/>antecedent to seeking early prenatal care. Reasons for delaying<br/><br/>care included lack of knowledge of pregnancy symptoms, denying the<br/><br/>pregnancy, fear of parents response to the pregnancy, and lack of<br/><br/>financial resources. Since this is a large sample for qualitative<br/><br/>research, results could be used to suggest content regarding<br/><br/>recognition of pregnancy symptoms and the value of early prenatal<br/><br/>care in late elementary school including continued efforts to<br/><br/>enlist parental acceptance and support. Public service<br/><br/>announcements in the popular media could also help to accomplish<br/><br/>these goals. Implications for nursing practice include instruction<br/><br/>on pregnancy recognition and the importance of early prenatal care<br/><br/>in nursing and health care activities aimed at preadolescent,<br/><br/>adolescent, childbearing and childrearing women in order to<br/><br/>increase the likelihood that all pregnant females will enter<br/><br/>prenatal care during the first trimester of their pregnancies.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:50:47Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:50:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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