2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152812
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attachment and quality-of-life profiles in older, non-institutionalized men
Abstract:
Attachment and quality-of-life profiles in older, non-institutionalized men
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Gallman, Ruth, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing
Title:Professor
This descriptive, correlational study investigated l) the

attachment and quality-of-life profiles of older, non-

institutionalized men, and 2) the relatiohships among attachment,

quality-of-life, and selected demographic variables. Four research

questions guided this study: l) What are the attachment profiles

of older non-institutionalized men?; 2) What are the dyadic bonds

of older, non-institutionalized men?; 3) What are the quality-of-

life profiles of older, non-institutionalized men?, and 4) What are

the relationships among attachment, quality-of-life, and selected

demographic variables in a sample of older, non-institutionalized

men? The theoretical framework for the study was based on Bowlby's

theory of attachment and Chubon's views regarding subjectively

perceived quality-of-life, or life satisfaction.



The target population included men living in a central Texas urban

community who were 58 years of age and older. A convenience sample

of 100 older men who were living independently in the community

participated in the study. Subjects were contacted at a Health

Fest, a Retirement Exposition, senior citizens activity centers,

and AARP meetings in Austin, Texas. Three questionnaires were

used: a demographic data form, the 20 item Lipson Parra Adult

Attachment Scale (1989) to measure the level of attachment to a

significant other, and Chubon's (1987) Life Situation Survey (LSS)

to measure perceived quality-of-life/life satisfaction. The

statistical package SPSS-X was used for data analysis, including

frequencies, correlation, and stepwise multiple regression.



The mean age of the sample was 68.4 years and the majority of the

subjects were white protestants, most of whom were married and

living with their spouse. A majority denied having any health

problems or any condition that limited their activity.



Findings indicated that subjects reported a strong level of

attachment (X=72.2; SD=9.67) to a significant other, primarily a

spouse (67 percent). Other reported attachments were to a friend

(9 percent), daughter (7 percent), `other relative (4 percent),

and 1 percent each to a mother, son, grandaughter, or sister.

Subjects' responses on the LSS evidenced perceptions of a very high

quality of life. The mean score of 107.3 is equal to the highest

LSS score reported by Chubon (1987). Pearson correlations among

total attachment score, total quality-of-life score and demographic

variables showed a significant relationship (r=.31; p=.005) between

perceived attachment and quality-of-life in the subjects. There

were also significant relationships between the following

demographic variables and attachment: age (r=.25; p=.02); marital

status (r=.24; p=.03); having female children (r=-.21; p=.05);

having sibling brothers (r=.24; p=.02); having living brothers

(r=.24; p=.03); time in current residence (r=.21; p=.05); and the

perception of no health problem (r=-.21; p=.05). The one

demographic variable that was significantly correlated to a high

quality of life was the subjects' perception that they did not have

any limiting health problem (r=.36; p=.001). Stepwise multiple

regression revealed that the following four predictor variables

accounted for a total of 26 percent of the variance of the

attachment total score: 1) life situation survey total score

(rsq=.09); 2) marital status (rsq=. 16); 3) male children

(rsq=.21); 4) and living brothers (rsq=.26). Regarding predictors

of quality-of-life, only one variable, the attachment total score,

entered the multiple regression equation (rsq=.09), accounting for

9 percent of the total variance. These findings support Bowlby's

(1973) conclusion that human beings of all ages are happiest and

most satisfied with their lives when they feel attached to one or

more trusted persons. As health care professionals, nurses can

assist elderly individuals in maintaining or transitioning

attachment bonds which may be essential for their survival and

increased quality of life.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttachment and quality-of-life profiles in older, non-institutionalized menen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152812-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attachment and quality-of-life profiles in older, non-institutionalized men</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gallman, Ruth, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lgallman@mail.utexas.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This descriptive, correlational study investigated l) the<br/><br/>attachment and quality-of-life profiles of older, non-<br/><br/>institutionalized men, and 2) the relatiohships among attachment,<br/><br/>quality-of-life, and selected demographic variables. Four research<br/><br/>questions guided this study: l) What are the attachment profiles<br/><br/>of older non-institutionalized men?; 2) What are the dyadic bonds<br/><br/>of older, non-institutionalized men?; 3) What are the quality-of-<br/><br/>life profiles of older, non-institutionalized men?, and 4) What are<br/><br/>the relationships among attachment, quality-of-life, and selected<br/><br/>demographic variables in a sample of older, non-institutionalized<br/><br/>men? The theoretical framework for the study was based on Bowlby's<br/><br/>theory of attachment and Chubon's views regarding subjectively<br/><br/>perceived quality-of-life, or life satisfaction.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The target population included men living in a central Texas urban<br/><br/>community who were 58 years of age and older. A convenience sample<br/><br/>of 100 older men who were living independently in the community<br/><br/>participated in the study. Subjects were contacted at a Health<br/><br/>Fest, a Retirement Exposition, senior citizens activity centers,<br/><br/>and AARP meetings in Austin, Texas. Three questionnaires were<br/><br/>used: a demographic data form, the 20 item Lipson Parra Adult<br/><br/>Attachment Scale (1989) to measure the level of attachment to a<br/><br/>significant other, and Chubon's (1987) Life Situation Survey (LSS)<br/><br/>to measure perceived quality-of-life/life satisfaction. The<br/><br/>statistical package SPSS-X was used for data analysis, including<br/><br/>frequencies, correlation, and stepwise multiple regression.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The mean age of the sample was 68.4 years and the majority of the<br/><br/>subjects were white protestants, most of whom were married and<br/><br/>living with their spouse. A majority denied having any health<br/><br/>problems or any condition that limited their activity.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings indicated that subjects reported a strong level of<br/><br/>attachment (X=72.2; SD=9.67) to a significant other, primarily a<br/><br/>spouse (67 percent). Other reported attachments were to a friend<br/><br/>(9 percent), daughter (7 percent), `other relative (4 percent),<br/><br/>and 1 percent each to a mother, son, grandaughter, or sister.<br/><br/>Subjects' responses on the LSS evidenced perceptions of a very high<br/><br/>quality of life. The mean score of 107.3 is equal to the highest<br/><br/>LSS score reported by Chubon (1987). Pearson correlations among<br/><br/>total attachment score, total quality-of-life score and demographic<br/><br/>variables showed a significant relationship (r=.31; p=.005) between<br/><br/>perceived attachment and quality-of-life in the subjects. There<br/><br/>were also significant relationships between the following<br/><br/>demographic variables and attachment: age (r=.25; p=.02); marital<br/><br/>status (r=.24; p=.03); having female children (r=-.21; p=.05);<br/><br/>having sibling brothers (r=.24; p=.02); having living brothers<br/><br/>(r=.24; p=.03); time in current residence (r=.21; p=.05); and the<br/><br/>perception of no health problem (r=-.21; p=.05). The one<br/><br/>demographic variable that was significantly correlated to a high<br/><br/>quality of life was the subjects' perception that they did not have<br/><br/>any limiting health problem (r=.36; p=.001). Stepwise multiple<br/><br/>regression revealed that the following four predictor variables<br/><br/>accounted for a total of 26 percent of the variance of the<br/><br/>attachment total score: 1) life situation survey total score<br/><br/>(rsq=.09); 2) marital status (rsq=. 16); 3) male children<br/><br/>(rsq=.21); 4) and living brothers (rsq=.26). Regarding predictors<br/><br/>of quality-of-life, only one variable, the attachment total score,<br/><br/>entered the multiple regression equation (rsq=.09), accounting for<br/><br/>9 percent of the total variance. These findings support Bowlby's<br/><br/>(1973) conclusion that human beings of all ages are happiest and<br/><br/>most satisfied with their lives when they feel attached to one or<br/><br/>more trusted persons. As health care professionals, nurses can<br/><br/>assist elderly individuals in maintaining or transitioning<br/><br/>attachment bonds which may be essential for their survival and<br/><br/>increased quality of life.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:50:49Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:50:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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