Nursing Students’ Knowledge, Observation of Environmental Risk Factors, and Compliance with Recommended Precautions for the Prevention of Transmission of Infectious Diseases by Needlestick Injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152818
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Students’ Knowledge, Observation of Environmental Risk Factors, and Compliance with Recommended Precautions for the Prevention of Transmission of Infectious Diseases by Needlestick Injury
Abstract:
Nursing Students’ Knowledge, Observation of Environmental Risk Factors, and Compliance with Recommended Precautions for the Prevention of Transmission of Infectious Diseases by Needlestick Injury
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Logan, Cynthia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Southeastern Louisiana University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: To determine the relationships between selected institutional and personal demographic factors, knowledge, observation of environmental risk factors, and the degree of nursing student compliance with precautions for the prevention of transmission of infectious diseases. Design: Descriptive, correlational study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Data was collected from 710 students enrolled in clinical courses at seven randomly selected associate and baccalaureate degree nursing programs in Louisiana during 2000/2001. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable(s): Relationships between nursing students’ knowledge of factors related to disease transmission by needlestick injury, observations of environmental risk factors, and compliance with recommended precautions for the prevention of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens were examined. Methods: An 89 item questionnaire was administered to students enrolled in clinical courses at three associate degree and four baccalaureate nursing programs in order to measure knowledge, compliance, observations of environmental risk factors, and demographics. Findings: Mean scores on knowledge, for students from baccalaureate and associate degree programs did not differ, but scores for both groups were lower than might be expected for mastery level achievement. Baccalaureate nursing students scored significantly higher on compliance than associate degree students, t(617) = 7.62, p = .000, d = .31. Students indicated that demonstration was the most helpful teaching strategy, but it was used less often than lecture. Students followed precautions more often when modeling the actions of admired teachers than when modeling the actions of admired nurses. Seven variables explained 20.6% of the variance in compliance. Conclusions: Considering the gravity of potential consequences of needlestick injuries, greater mastery of content related to the prevention of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens is desirable and justified.Implications:The findings suggest that nurse educators reconsider curriculum design, course content, and teaching strategies concerning nursing student compliance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Students’ Knowledge, Observation of Environmental Risk Factors, and Compliance with Recommended Precautions for the Prevention of Transmission of Infectious Diseases by Needlestick Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152818-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Students&rsquo; Knowledge, Observation of Environmental Risk Factors, and Compliance with Recommended Precautions for the Prevention of Transmission of Infectious Diseases by Needlestick Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Logan, Cynthia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southeastern Louisiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">clogan@selu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract"> Objective: To determine the relationships between selected institutional and personal demographic factors, knowledge, observation of environmental risk factors, and the degree of nursing student compliance with precautions for the prevention of transmission of infectious diseases. Design: Descriptive, correlational study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Data was collected from 710 students enrolled in clinical courses at seven randomly selected associate and baccalaureate degree nursing programs in Louisiana during 2000/2001. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable(s): Relationships between nursing students&rsquo; knowledge of factors related to disease transmission by needlestick injury, observations of environmental risk factors, and compliance with recommended precautions for the prevention of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens were examined. Methods: An 89 item questionnaire was administered to students enrolled in clinical courses at three associate degree and four baccalaureate nursing programs in order to measure knowledge, compliance, observations of environmental risk factors, and demographics. Findings: Mean scores on knowledge, for students from baccalaureate and associate degree programs did not differ, but scores for both groups were lower than might be expected for mastery level achievement. Baccalaureate nursing students scored significantly higher on compliance than associate degree students, t(617) = 7.62, p = .000, d = .31. Students indicated that demonstration was the most helpful teaching strategy, but it was used less often than lecture. Students followed precautions more often when modeling the actions of admired teachers than when modeling the actions of admired nurses. Seven variables explained 20.6% of the variance in compliance. Conclusions: Considering the gravity of potential consequences of needlestick injuries, greater mastery of content related to the prevention of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens is desirable and justified.Implications:The findings suggest that nurse educators reconsider curriculum design, course content, and teaching strategies concerning nursing student compliance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:51:04Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:51:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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