2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152832
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Confusion Experience from the Inside Out
Abstract:
The Confusion Experience from the Inside Out
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Billings, Judith
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska at Kearney
Title:Professor and Assistant Dean
Objective: The objective of this study is to describe the confusion experience from the patient's perspective. Design: This descriptive study uses the qualitative research method of phenomenology. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population is persons 60 years of age and older who have had an acute confusion experience. A purposive sampling method is being used. The setting is a medium sized community located in a rural area of the Midwest in the United States of America. Four interviews have been completed resulting in richly detailed stories of the confusional experience. Data collection to redundancy continues. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable(s): The concept under study is acute confusion experience (s) described in the stories told by elderly participants. Methods: Semistructured interviews are conducted with a purposive sample of elderly who meet the following criteria: a) Report having experienced temporary confusion during an illness, b) Over 60 years of age, c) Able to speak and hear conversational speech and engage in verbal exchange in English. Persons confused at the time of the interview, as measured by the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ) are not eligible for the study. Interviews are tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and subjected to phenomenological analysis using the methods developed by Colaizzi. Findings: Preliminary findings indicate that at the time of the confusion experience and for months afterward the experience seemed very real to the respondents. Three themes predominate the preliminary data: Overwhelmed - confusion is described as a sensation of too many things happening at once and an inability to focus on any one thing. Participants felt pressured and overstimulated and reported being unable to handle these multiple stressors, "It isn't that I forget or mix things up . . it's just that it is all there at once. It's hard to think of just any one thing. It's like you're covered with something." "Hashed" Thinking - participants talked about their mind not working properly, going blank or not thinking straight. They reported trouble concentrating, feeling bogged down and frustrated. "Everything is all hashed around in your thinking." Real-But Unreal - there was an inability to differentiate between what is real and what is unreal during the confusion. Emotional responses such as physical and emotional pain, crying, fear, anguish, frustration and urgency were triggered by these seemingly real situations. Participants continue to report the "realness" of their experiences even though they now know otherwise. "I heard things that were so real to me I even cried about them. To me it was reality and to this day it seems like it happened." Conclusions: These participant descriptions provide a starting point to understanding the phenomena of confusion from the "inside out." Not all who experience acute confusion remember the incident, but for those who do remember, the realness of the memory is vivid and detailed. Implications: Nurses need to consider approaching confused patients from the perspective of the patient's confusion experiences rather than from the nurse's perspective. Without insight into the subjective meaning and experience of acute confusion, a comprehensive understanding of this phenomenon may not be attainable. These findings provide the basis for further investigation into the confusion experience.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Confusion Experience from the Inside Outen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152832-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Confusion Experience from the Inside Out</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Billings, Judith</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska at Kearney</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Assistant Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jbilling@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of this study is to describe the confusion experience from the patient's perspective. Design: This descriptive study uses the qualitative research method of phenomenology. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population is persons 60 years of age and older who have had an acute confusion experience. A purposive sampling method is being used. The setting is a medium sized community located in a rural area of the Midwest in the United States of America. Four interviews have been completed resulting in richly detailed stories of the confusional experience. Data collection to redundancy continues. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable(s): The concept under study is acute confusion experience (s) described in the stories told by elderly participants. Methods: Semistructured interviews are conducted with a purposive sample of elderly who meet the following criteria: a) Report having experienced temporary confusion during an illness, b) Over 60 years of age, c) Able to speak and hear conversational speech and engage in verbal exchange in English. Persons confused at the time of the interview, as measured by the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ) are not eligible for the study. Interviews are tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and subjected to phenomenological analysis using the methods developed by Colaizzi. Findings: Preliminary findings indicate that at the time of the confusion experience and for months afterward the experience seemed very real to the respondents. Three themes predominate the preliminary data: Overwhelmed - confusion is described as a sensation of too many things happening at once and an inability to focus on any one thing. Participants felt pressured and overstimulated and reported being unable to handle these multiple stressors, &quot;It isn't that I forget or mix things up . . it's just that it is all there at once. It's hard to think of just any one thing. It's like you're covered with something.&quot; &quot;Hashed&quot; Thinking - participants talked about their mind not working properly, going blank or not thinking straight. They reported trouble concentrating, feeling bogged down and frustrated. &quot;Everything is all hashed around in your thinking.&quot; Real-But Unreal - there was an inability to differentiate between what is real and what is unreal during the confusion. Emotional responses such as physical and emotional pain, crying, fear, anguish, frustration and urgency were triggered by these seemingly real situations. Participants continue to report the &quot;realness&quot; of their experiences even though they now know otherwise. &quot;I heard things that were so real to me I even cried about them. To me it was reality and to this day it seems like it happened.&quot; Conclusions: These participant descriptions provide a starting point to understanding the phenomena of confusion from the &quot;inside out.&quot; Not all who experience acute confusion remember the incident, but for those who do remember, the realness of the memory is vivid and detailed. Implications: Nurses need to consider approaching confused patients from the perspective of the patient's confusion experiences rather than from the nurse's perspective. Without insight into the subjective meaning and experience of acute confusion, a comprehensive understanding of this phenomenon may not be attainable. These findings provide the basis for further investigation into the confusion experience.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:51:38Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:51:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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