2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152835
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Case for Peer Teaching: Implications for Nursing Education
Abstract:
The Case for Peer Teaching: Implications for Nursing Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Blowers, Sally S., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:East Tennessee State University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Priscilla Ramsey, RN, PhD and Carolyn Merriman, APRN, MS, BC
[Research Presentation] The call to evidence-based practice rightly extends to nursing education. There is an urgent need to identify and validate alternatives to the standard teaching practices used in most nursing programs in order to maximize our teaching effectiveness and our educational outcomes in this era of nursing shortage. This qualitative case study offers support for the practice of peer teaching as an effective educational strategy. A formal peer tutoring program was established in a four-year baccalaureate nursing program in a regional Appalachian university's College of Nursing. The program includes recruitment, individualized tutor training, centralized communication, a convenient location for tutoring activities, a salary for tutors (without charge to the tutorees*), and resources for tutors. Following the initial semester of implementation, a pilot study was conducted to identify the quality and effects of peer teaching, and to understand the nature of the peer tutor/tutoree relationship from the perspectives of the participants. Twelve peer tutors and 14 tutorees were interviewed by the faculty director of the peer tutor program. A two-part guiding question was used to initiate each interview: Please talk about the best/worst tutoring session you have experienced. The interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim, then analyzed for common themes. The themes were then presented to two focus groups to check for correspondence between the data and their experiences. Additional data included Likert-scale evaluation forms completed by both tutors and tutorees. Preliminary data analysis indicates that peer tutors use essentially the same teaching techniques and methods as faculty. However, the outcomes of peer teaching indicate that learners more often achieve deep learning (as opposed to surface learning) when taught by peers and that the peer teacher/peer learner relationship is broader in scope, more significant, and often more long-lasting than the faculty/student relationship. *The word tutoree is used throughout instead of "tutee."
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Case for Peer Teaching: Implications for Nursing Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152835-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Case for Peer Teaching: Implications for Nursing Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Blowers, Sally S., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">East Tennessee State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">blowers@etsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Priscilla Ramsey, RN, PhD and Carolyn Merriman, APRN, MS, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] The call to evidence-based practice rightly extends to nursing education. There is an urgent need to identify and validate alternatives to the standard teaching practices used in most nursing programs in order to maximize our teaching effectiveness and our educational outcomes in this era of nursing shortage. This qualitative case study offers support for the practice of peer teaching as an effective educational strategy. A formal peer tutoring program was established in a four-year baccalaureate nursing program in a regional Appalachian university's College of Nursing. The program includes recruitment, individualized tutor training, centralized communication, a convenient location for tutoring activities, a salary for tutors (without charge to the tutorees*), and resources for tutors. Following the initial semester of implementation, a pilot study was conducted to identify the quality and effects of peer teaching, and to understand the nature of the peer tutor/tutoree relationship from the perspectives of the participants. Twelve peer tutors and 14 tutorees were interviewed by the faculty director of the peer tutor program. A two-part guiding question was used to initiate each interview: Please talk about the best/worst tutoring session you have experienced. The interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim, then analyzed for common themes. The themes were then presented to two focus groups to check for correspondence between the data and their experiences. Additional data included Likert-scale evaluation forms completed by both tutors and tutorees. Preliminary data analysis indicates that peer tutors use essentially the same teaching techniques and methods as faculty. However, the outcomes of peer teaching indicate that learners more often achieve deep learning (as opposed to surface learning) when taught by peers and that the peer teacher/peer learner relationship is broader in scope, more significant, and often more long-lasting than the faculty/student relationship. *The word tutoree is used throughout instead of &quot;tutee.&quot;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:51:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:51:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.