Motivating registered nurses to implement the nursing process at Veterans Affairs Medical Centers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152842
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivating registered nurses to implement the nursing process at Veterans Affairs Medical Centers
Abstract:
Motivating registered nurses to implement the nursing process at Veterans Affairs Medical Centers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Allen, Carol, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Title:Associate Chief Nursing Education
Research Question: What are the effects of inservice education

concerning the nursing process on changing the cognition,

attitudes, expectancies, attributions, job satisfaction, and

behavior of registered nurses (RNs) toward implementation of the

nursing process in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers?



Theoretical Framework: Cognitive motivation theory provided the

framework (Rotter, 1954; Porter, 1962; Vroom, 1964; Weiner, 1972;

and Mitchell, 1973) for the present study.



Method: The design was quasi-experimental. Veterans Affairs

Medical Centers (n=4) located in the Midwest provided the setting.

The subjects were RNs working in staff nurse positions. A

convenience sample (n=75) was utilized for the pilot study. A

convenience sample (n=172) was employed for the main study; 82

subjects in the control group; and 90 subjects in the treatment

group. An evaluation instrument was developed by the author to

measure the dependent variables: knowledge, attitudes,

expectancies, attributions, and job satisfaction. An exercise

measured the dependent variable, behavior. Cronbach's alpha

coefficient estimated the internal consistency of the dependent

variables. Two experts confirmed the face validity of the

questions pertaining to all variables. A pilot study was conducted

to evaluate procedures and assessment instruments for the main

study. The independent variable, inservice education, embodied

lecture content on the nursing process. The study consisted of one

four-hour inservice education session for the treatment group,

after which the dependent variables were assessed. The control

group completed the dependent measures before receiving the same

instruction. The t-test, covariate analysis, and multiple

regression analysis provided the principal test of the study's

hypotheses.



Results: As predicted, RNs who received inservice education

applied the steps of the nursing process significantly more

correctly than those not receiving the instruction, t(170)=3.87,

p<.01. Cognitive motivational variables demonstrated

nonsignificant findings. Random assignment to treatment groups was

not possible. Therefore, covariate analysis was conducted, and the

findings eliminated the influence of extraneous variables on the

dependent variables. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated

that combining four key predictors accounted for R=.36 or 13

percent of the total performance in application of the nursing

process.



Conclusions: The highly significant findings suggest that

inservice education motivated the RNs to change behaviors by

correctly implementing the nursing process. The same attitudes

prevailed at all four VAMCs. The constraints of the VA bureaucracy

may have overwhelmed the cognitive motivational variables resulting

in nonsignificant findings. Further investigation is required.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotivating registered nurses to implement the nursing process at Veterans Affairs Medical Centersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152842-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motivating registered nurses to implement the nursing process at Veterans Affairs Medical Centers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Allen, Carol, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Veterans Affairs Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Chief Nursing Education</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research Question: What are the effects of inservice education<br/><br/>concerning the nursing process on changing the cognition,<br/><br/>attitudes, expectancies, attributions, job satisfaction, and<br/><br/>behavior of registered nurses (RNs) toward implementation of the<br/><br/>nursing process in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers?<br/><br/><br/><br/>Theoretical Framework: Cognitive motivation theory provided the<br/><br/>framework (Rotter, 1954; Porter, 1962; Vroom, 1964; Weiner, 1972;<br/><br/>and Mitchell, 1973) for the present study.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Method: The design was quasi-experimental. Veterans Affairs<br/><br/>Medical Centers (n=4) located in the Midwest provided the setting.<br/><br/>The subjects were RNs working in staff nurse positions. A<br/><br/>convenience sample (n=75) was utilized for the pilot study. A<br/><br/>convenience sample (n=172) was employed for the main study; 82<br/><br/>subjects in the control group; and 90 subjects in the treatment<br/><br/>group. An evaluation instrument was developed by the author to<br/><br/>measure the dependent variables: knowledge, attitudes,<br/><br/>expectancies, attributions, and job satisfaction. An exercise<br/><br/>measured the dependent variable, behavior. Cronbach's alpha<br/><br/>coefficient estimated the internal consistency of the dependent<br/><br/>variables. Two experts confirmed the face validity of the<br/><br/>questions pertaining to all variables. A pilot study was conducted<br/><br/>to evaluate procedures and assessment instruments for the main<br/><br/>study. The independent variable, inservice education, embodied<br/><br/>lecture content on the nursing process. The study consisted of one<br/><br/>four-hour inservice education session for the treatment group,<br/><br/>after which the dependent variables were assessed. The control<br/><br/>group completed the dependent measures before receiving the same<br/><br/>instruction. The t-test, covariate analysis, and multiple<br/><br/>regression analysis provided the principal test of the study's<br/><br/>hypotheses.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Results: As predicted, RNs who received inservice education<br/><br/>applied the steps of the nursing process significantly more<br/><br/>correctly than those not receiving the instruction, t(170)=3.87,<br/><br/>p&lt;.01. Cognitive motivational variables demonstrated<br/><br/>nonsignificant findings. Random assignment to treatment groups was<br/><br/>not possible. Therefore, covariate analysis was conducted, and the<br/><br/>findings eliminated the influence of extraneous variables on the<br/><br/>dependent variables. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated<br/><br/>that combining four key predictors accounted for R=.36 or 13<br/><br/>percent of the total performance in application of the nursing<br/><br/>process.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Conclusions: The highly significant findings suggest that<br/><br/>inservice education motivated the RNs to change behaviors by<br/><br/>correctly implementing the nursing process. The same attitudes<br/><br/>prevailed at all four VAMCs. The constraints of the VA bureaucracy<br/><br/>may have overwhelmed the cognitive motivational variables resulting<br/><br/>in nonsignificant findings. Further investigation is required.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:52:01Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:52:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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