Perceptions of illness conditions and their treatment among Mexican-American residents in southwest Texas

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152844
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of illness conditions and their treatment among Mexican-American residents in southwest Texas
Abstract:
Perceptions of illness conditions and their treatment among Mexican-American residents in southwest Texas
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1993
Conference Date:June 21 - 22, 1993
Author:Lantican, Leticia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at El Paso, College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences
Title:Associate Professor
This study aimed to explore and describe the perceptions of illness conditions and their treatment among Mexican-Americans in an unserved border community in Southwest Texas. Specifically, it sought answers to the following research questions: What are the perceptions of illness conditions among residents in a border community? What home treatments are used and when are medical consultations sought? The obtained data, as part of a larger study on health needs, beliefs and problems of Mexican-American residents in a border community, will be used as bases for developing more culturally-sensitive health programs.



Orem's Self-Care theory guided the conduct of this study. Face to face interviews were conducted with 200 household respondents. The interview-questionnaire consisted of items on sociodemographics, health beliefs and practices, and calendar of illness events. The field data collectors were high school graduates who were residents of the community for 16 years.



Data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using frequencies and percentages. Majority of the respondents were married (89 percent), Catholics (75 percent), low-income (79 percent), housewives (71 percent), middle-aged, elementary graduates and 8 years' residence in the community.



Perceptions of illness conditions were categorized into internal and external causations. The illness conditions ascribed to external causes were: cough, fever, headache, body weakness, vomiting, throat pain, chills, stomach ache and chest pain. Those perceived to be internally-caused were: sadness, crying, lack of appetite, headache, body weakness and chest pain. It was noted that headache, body weakness, and chest pain were included in both categories. Furthermore, conditions such as headaches, crying, sadness, body weakness, lack of appetite and stomachache were associated with strong emotional experiences. Chest pain, cough, throat pain, chills and fever were related to external climatic conditions such as wind, dust, pollution and sudden weather change.



Vomiting was associated with eating contaminated foods and overeating or other internally ascribed factors such as pregnancy. Leg pain was also associated with cold but more commonly attributed to fatigue or exertion.



Initial treatment of these ailments comprised using folk home remedies such as herbal teas and over the counter medications. Illness conditions for which over the counter medications were used immediately were: headaches, cough, fever, vomiting, throat pain, chills, and stomachache. Interestingly, a variety of drugs cited in relation to specific illness conditions could be classified as analgesic, antipyretic, antispasmodic, antibiotics, and others indicating familiarity with these drugs. Furthermore, these drugs are readily available in nearby Mexico.



Overall, data indicated a mixture of folk and western influence in both perceptions and treatment of illness conditions. Of significant implication to nursing practice was the immediate readiness to use over the counter medication in combination with folk remedies. This raises a strong need for health education when both medications and herbs are combined.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jun-1993
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of illness conditions and their treatment among Mexican-American residents in southwest Texasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152844-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceptions of illness conditions and their treatment among Mexican-American residents in southwest Texas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1993</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June 21 - 22, 1993</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lantican, Leticia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at El Paso, College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">llantica@utep.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study aimed to explore and describe the perceptions of illness conditions and their treatment among Mexican-Americans in an unserved border community in Southwest Texas. Specifically, it sought answers to the following research questions: What are the perceptions of illness conditions among residents in a border community? What home treatments are used and when are medical consultations sought? The obtained data, as part of a larger study on health needs, beliefs and problems of Mexican-American residents in a border community, will be used as bases for developing more culturally-sensitive health programs.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Orem's Self-Care theory guided the conduct of this study. Face to face interviews were conducted with 200 household respondents. The interview-questionnaire consisted of items on sociodemographics, health beliefs and practices, and calendar of illness events. The field data collectors were high school graduates who were residents of the community for 16 years.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using frequencies and percentages. Majority of the respondents were married (89 percent), Catholics (75 percent), low-income (79 percent), housewives (71 percent), middle-aged, elementary graduates and 8 years' residence in the community.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Perceptions of illness conditions were categorized into internal and external causations. The illness conditions ascribed to external causes were: cough, fever, headache, body weakness, vomiting, throat pain, chills, stomach ache and chest pain. Those perceived to be internally-caused were: sadness, crying, lack of appetite, headache, body weakness and chest pain. It was noted that headache, body weakness, and chest pain were included in both categories. Furthermore, conditions such as headaches, crying, sadness, body weakness, lack of appetite and stomachache were associated with strong emotional experiences. Chest pain, cough, throat pain, chills and fever were related to external climatic conditions such as wind, dust, pollution and sudden weather change.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Vomiting was associated with eating contaminated foods and overeating or other internally ascribed factors such as pregnancy. Leg pain was also associated with cold but more commonly attributed to fatigue or exertion.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Initial treatment of these ailments comprised using folk home remedies such as herbal teas and over the counter medications. Illness conditions for which over the counter medications were used immediately were: headaches, cough, fever, vomiting, throat pain, chills, and stomachache. Interestingly, a variety of drugs cited in relation to specific illness conditions could be classified as analgesic, antipyretic, antispasmodic, antibiotics, and others indicating familiarity with these drugs. Furthermore, these drugs are readily available in nearby Mexico.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Overall, data indicated a mixture of folk and western influence in both perceptions and treatment of illness conditions. Of significant implication to nursing practice was the immediate readiness to use over the counter medication in combination with folk remedies. This raises a strong need for health education when both medications and herbs are combined.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:52:06Z-
dc.date.issued1993-06-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:52:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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