The history of the council on graduate education for administration in nursing (1970-1990) and the evolution of nursing administration graduate curricula in the United States

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152845
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The history of the council on graduate education for administration in nursing (1970-1990) and the evolution of nursing administration graduate curricula in the United States
Abstract:
The history of the council on graduate education for administration in nursing (1970-1990) and the evolution of nursing administration graduate curricula in the United States
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1993
Conference Date:June 21 - 22, 1993
Author:Carroll, Theresa, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
Title:Professor and Associate Dean
The absence of knowledge of administration "spells confused and dispersed responsibilities, wasted resources, sick morale, and a defect of proper patient care" (Finer, 1952). The exact curricula to prepare nurses to be effective administrators has been hotly debated (Kelley, 1976; Stevens, 1978; IOM, 1983; Clelland, 1984; Simms, 1989). The Council on Graduate Education for Administration in Nursing (CGEAN) was founded in 1970 to provide a forum for exploring the state of the art of nursing administration curricula in the United States. Specifically, graduate faculty were invited to familiarize themselves with the strong commonalties, rich differences, and rationale for curriculum decisions with the "intent here being informed insight and exchange of ideas…" (Weber, 1970).



The historical method of research was used to analyze the activities of CGEAN and determine the relationship between CGEAN activities and the evolution of nursing administration graduate curricula. Information pertaining to CGEAN was obtained principally from primary sources including meeting minutes, correspondence with charter members and past officers, personal papers of officers, and personal interviews. The available material was reviewed for authenticity, accuracy, and significance.



Outcomes of the analysis and synthesis of these data demonstrate that CGEAN remained steadfast in its assumption that educational preparation for nursing administration should occur primarily in schools of nursing and that the educational preparation of nurse administrators is directly related to the quality of health care provided to patients. Four strategies emerge as the methods by which CGEAN has supported this assumption and impacted nursing administration education. These include: 1) networking among members and networking by members with leaders in other nursing organizations; 2) programming at the annual meeting; 3) publications such as Guide to Graduate Programs in Nursing Administration in the U.S. (Schultz, 1990 rev. 1992) and CGEAN Member Biographies (Marriner-Tomey, 1989 and Workman, 1991) which have been a resource for identifying member expertise; 4) position papers that have educated members who were initiating new programs and provided standards for insuring quality in existing programs.



In 1990 the purposes of CGEAN were revisited and broadened to include recognition of the need to interface with health care administration, health policy planning international nursing administration. Based on its history of providing a forum where healthy intellectual friction yields outcomes that affect practice and its rich source of membership talent, CGEAN could provide a major vehicle for discussing curriculum and theory building issues thereby supporting the Rockefeller Foundation funded work of Henry et al. (1989), as well as recent goals of ICN and WHO, which are aimed at facilitating the responsible practice of nursing administration worldwide.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jun-1993
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe history of the council on graduate education for administration in nursing (1970-1990) and the evolution of nursing administration graduate curricula in the United Statesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152845-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The history of the council on graduate education for administration in nursing (1970-1990) and the evolution of nursing administration graduate curricula in the United States</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1993</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June 21 - 22, 1993</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carroll, Theresa, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">theresa.l.carroll@uth.tmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The absence of knowledge of administration &quot;spells confused and dispersed responsibilities, wasted resources, sick morale, and a defect of proper patient care&quot; (Finer, 1952). The exact curricula to prepare nurses to be effective administrators has been hotly debated (Kelley, 1976; Stevens, 1978; IOM, 1983; Clelland, 1984; Simms, 1989). The Council on Graduate Education for Administration in Nursing (CGEAN) was founded in 1970 to provide a forum for exploring the state of the art of nursing administration curricula in the United States. Specifically, graduate faculty were invited to familiarize themselves with the strong commonalties, rich differences, and rationale for curriculum decisions with the &quot;intent here being informed insight and exchange of ideas&hellip;&quot; (Weber, 1970).<br/><br/><br/><br/>The historical method of research was used to analyze the activities of CGEAN and determine the relationship between CGEAN activities and the evolution of nursing administration graduate curricula. Information pertaining to CGEAN was obtained principally from primary sources including meeting minutes, correspondence with charter members and past officers, personal papers of officers, and personal interviews. The available material was reviewed for authenticity, accuracy, and significance.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Outcomes of the analysis and synthesis of these data demonstrate that CGEAN remained steadfast in its assumption that educational preparation for nursing administration should occur primarily in schools of nursing and that the educational preparation of nurse administrators is directly related to the quality of health care provided to patients. Four strategies emerge as the methods by which CGEAN has supported this assumption and impacted nursing administration education. These include: 1) networking among members and networking by members with leaders in other nursing organizations; 2) programming at the annual meeting; 3) publications such as Guide to Graduate Programs in Nursing Administration in the U.S. (Schultz, 1990 rev. 1992) and CGEAN Member Biographies (Marriner-Tomey, 1989 and Workman, 1991) which have been a resource for identifying member expertise; 4) position papers that have educated members who were initiating new programs and provided standards for insuring quality in existing programs. <br/><br/><br/><br/>In 1990 the purposes of CGEAN were revisited and broadened to include recognition of the need to interface with health care administration, health policy planning international nursing administration. Based on its history of providing a forum where healthy intellectual friction yields outcomes that affect practice and its rich source of membership talent, CGEAN could provide a major vehicle for discussing curriculum and theory building issues thereby supporting the Rockefeller Foundation funded work of Henry et al. (1989), as well as recent goals of ICN and WHO, which are aimed at facilitating the responsible practice of nursing administration worldwide.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:52:09Z-
dc.date.issued1993-06-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:52:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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