Survivors Not Victims: Resource Use by Women with Domestic Violence Experiences

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152849
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Survivors Not Victims: Resource Use by Women with Domestic Violence Experiences
Abstract:
Survivors Not Victims: Resource Use by Women with Domestic Violence Experiences
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Davis, Ruth, DEd
P.I. Institution Name:Millersville University
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: Discovery of the meanings inherent in the coping strategies of abused women in abusive. Design: Phenomenology guided data collection and analysis to uncover the resources used by women with domestic violence experiences with intimate partners. As the goal of phenomenology is to understand human experiences, women’s voices were elicited to uncover the meaning of various resources cultivated from enduring past experiences of abuse. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Over the course of one year, network sampling was used to recruit seventeen participants with domestic violence experiences. Participants were volunteers, living in both urban and rural settings, over a four county area. Although the participants varied in socio-economic status, ethnicity, and educational attainment, many were engaged in professional occupations. In addition, the women ranged in age from twenty-seven to fifty-one years. Methods: Data was collected through in-depth audio taped interviews. Interview questions were open-ended and probed three main categories of data. These included background of the abusive experience, outside agencies used by the women, and inner resources that facilitated coping. Interviews were transcribed and then analyzed for common themes. Findings: The analyzed data included broad categories of external and internal resources. External resources included legal aid, law enforcement and health and social services. The women also described internal coping strategies that assisted them in dealing with abusive experiences. Data analysis revealed three major themes related to inner resources and include self-preservation, resilience, and trusting self-discovery. While self-preservation enabled women to terminate abusive relationships, it also enabled them to stay when threats to their safety and to their children were present. Resilience is the ability of women to recover and heal from abusive experiences. Last, the theme of trusting self-discovery describes introspection whereby women can move on to a new stage in their lives after an abusive experience. Conclusions: Although no generalizations can be drawn from the findings of a qualitative study such as the one presented here, it does reveal new information regarding how women deal with abusive relationships. While outside resources are a major factor in the mechanics of how women eventually leave an abusive situation, inner resources enable women to successfully scrutinize the experience. Implications: Of external resources used, most participants did not view health care providers as helpful in providing assistance when they were in crisis from abuse. Formal education and continuing education in nursing should include in-depth information on domestic violence issues. Substantiation of the inner resources of abused women is an excellent starting place for developing both broader, quantitative studies as well as for improving program initiatives for professional nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSurvivors Not Victims: Resource Use by Women with Domestic Violence Experiencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152849-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Survivors Not Victims: Resource Use by Women with Domestic Violence Experiences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davis, Ruth, DEd</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Millersville University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">drruth8@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Discovery of the meanings inherent in the coping strategies of abused women in abusive. Design: Phenomenology guided data collection and analysis to uncover the resources used by women with domestic violence experiences with intimate partners. As the goal of phenomenology is to understand human experiences, women&rsquo;s voices were elicited to uncover the meaning of various resources cultivated from enduring past experiences of abuse. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Over the course of one year, network sampling was used to recruit seventeen participants with domestic violence experiences. Participants were volunteers, living in both urban and rural settings, over a four county area. Although the participants varied in socio-economic status, ethnicity, and educational attainment, many were engaged in professional occupations. In addition, the women ranged in age from twenty-seven to fifty-one years. Methods: Data was collected through in-depth audio taped interviews. Interview questions were open-ended and probed three main categories of data. These included background of the abusive experience, outside agencies used by the women, and inner resources that facilitated coping. Interviews were transcribed and then analyzed for common themes. Findings: The analyzed data included broad categories of external and internal resources. External resources included legal aid, law enforcement and health and social services. The women also described internal coping strategies that assisted them in dealing with abusive experiences. Data analysis revealed three major themes related to inner resources and include self-preservation, resilience, and trusting self-discovery. While self-preservation enabled women to terminate abusive relationships, it also enabled them to stay when threats to their safety and to their children were present. Resilience is the ability of women to recover and heal from abusive experiences. Last, the theme of trusting self-discovery describes introspection whereby women can move on to a new stage in their lives after an abusive experience. Conclusions: Although no generalizations can be drawn from the findings of a qualitative study such as the one presented here, it does reveal new information regarding how women deal with abusive relationships. While outside resources are a major factor in the mechanics of how women eventually leave an abusive situation, inner resources enable women to successfully scrutinize the experience. Implications: Of external resources used, most participants did not view health care providers as helpful in providing assistance when they were in crisis from abuse. Formal education and continuing education in nursing should include in-depth information on domestic violence issues. Substantiation of the inner resources of abused women is an excellent starting place for developing both broader, quantitative studies as well as for improving program initiatives for professional nurses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:52:19Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:52:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.