Getting Back into the Swing of Things: A Rogerian Portrait of Living with Traumatic Brain Injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152850
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Getting Back into the Swing of Things: A Rogerian Portrait of Living with Traumatic Brain Injury
Abstract:
Getting Back into the Swing of Things: A Rogerian Portrait of Living with Traumatic Brain Injury
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Dye, Maryellen
P.I. Institution Name:St. Luke's Regional Trauma Center
Title:Instructor
Introduction: Each year in the United States alone, over 500,000 individuals sustain traumatic brain injuries (TBI). For the 40,000 permanently disabled persons who sustain a severe TBI each year, achieving harmony within the environment is a complex journey. The process of living with TBI is labyrinthine; wherein some individuals are able to integrate the novel field patterns and exist harmoniously with their environment, while others remain disjoined; unable to achieve this same degree of pattern synchronicity. It is the experiences of the individuals who have regained a sense of harmony within their environment that may hold value for those who have not and still continue to struggle. This investigation of the pattern manifestations of the human field in mutual process with the environmental field after the punctuational change of TBI was guided by the theoretical framework of Rogerian science. Objectives: There were two primary objectives in this hermeneutic phenomenologic study conducted within Rogerian science: a) to describe the pattern manifestations of the human-environmental field that reflect the punctuational change of TBI. b) to gain an experiential understanding into the healing journey of individuals who achieve mutual process synchronicity. Design: The design of this qualitative constructivist inquiry investigation used the open process of hermeneutic phenomenology incorporating Rogerian Science. Population, Sample, Settings, Years: A purposive, saturation sampling method through word of mouth referrals, was used to recruit the final eight participants, all of whom were from the eastern seaboard of the United States. A severe brain injury was defined as injury to the brain which was associated with a Glasgow Coma Score of 8 of less, for any period of time immediately after the punctuational change of traumatic injury. Because articulation of the participants' eventual ability to recognize and utilize their pattern information is so important to this research question, only those participants who were considered "recovered" by themselves, their families, and their peers, and who had achieved a high degree of integration with their environment, were recruited for this study. Concepts: The concepts implicit in this investigation were traumatic brain injury, pattern manifestation, integrality, and mutual process. Methods: Using the methods of constructivist inquiry, audiotape transcribed interviews were analyzed in a concurrent manner using a hermeneutic dialectic, and a pattern portrait was ultimately constructed. Findings: The final pattern portrait constructed included the following prominent pattern changes: importance and magnitude of physical changes, role of independence vs. interdependence, difficulties of returning to work and integrating into the community, and heightened awareness. Prominent pattern changes noted in this investigation that are uncharacteristic of traumatic brain injury recovery in the literature include recovery time extending to four to six years, and functional gains made long after two years. Significant differences were also noted in the employment patterns of this group of individuals. All individuals were productively engaged before injury, and required three to four years after injury to find synchronous work patterns after injury. Seventy-five percent of the participants who were married at the time of injury were able to sustain their marriages after their injuries. This compares favorably with the higher divorce rates in other brain injury research literature. The individuals who were single at the time of injury characteristically had difficulty establishing independent lifestyles away from home after injury. Synchronous community integration patterns alluded all participants for several years but finally manifested with each individual. Conclusions: The process of living after TBI is complex and diverse. Four pattern areas in particular; overall recovery, family involvement, employability and community integration, remained problematic for many years, even for these individuals. These individuals demonstrated that the changed patterns of living after TBI need to be reconceptualized to incorporate all of the protracted period of recovery they experience, rather than the traditional two years as the current literature suggests. They surpassed all predictive literature estimates for all of the parameters noted above. Their pathway to success needs to be replicated for others. Implications: The implications that can be drawn from this work fall into two categories. The first category consists of implications for nursing. If the nurse is able to develop the ability to "pattern see" and to accurately assess the stage to which an individual's recovery has evolved, the practice methodology of Cowling (2000) might then be utilized in order to best distinguish and decide which services can then be utilized for the individual. The second major category includes those implications that need to be addressed on a societal level through policy development.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGetting Back into the Swing of Things: A Rogerian Portrait of Living with Traumatic Brain Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152850-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Getting Back into the Swing of Things: A Rogerian Portrait of Living with Traumatic Brain Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dye, Maryellen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Luke's Regional Trauma Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dyem@slhn.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Each year in the United States alone, over 500,000 individuals sustain traumatic brain injuries (TBI). For the 40,000 permanently disabled persons who sustain a severe TBI each year, achieving harmony within the environment is a complex journey. The process of living with TBI is labyrinthine; wherein some individuals are able to integrate the novel field patterns and exist harmoniously with their environment, while others remain disjoined; unable to achieve this same degree of pattern synchronicity. It is the experiences of the individuals who have regained a sense of harmony within their environment that may hold value for those who have not and still continue to struggle. This investigation of the pattern manifestations of the human field in mutual process with the environmental field after the punctuational change of TBI was guided by the theoretical framework of Rogerian science. Objectives: There were two primary objectives in this hermeneutic phenomenologic study conducted within Rogerian science: a) to describe the pattern manifestations of the human-environmental field that reflect the punctuational change of TBI. b) to gain an experiential understanding into the healing journey of individuals who achieve mutual process synchronicity. Design: The design of this qualitative constructivist inquiry investigation used the open process of hermeneutic phenomenology incorporating Rogerian Science. Population, Sample, Settings, Years: A purposive, saturation sampling method through word of mouth referrals, was used to recruit the final eight participants, all of whom were from the eastern seaboard of the United States. A severe brain injury was defined as injury to the brain which was associated with a Glasgow Coma Score of 8 of less, for any period of time immediately after the punctuational change of traumatic injury. Because articulation of the participants' eventual ability to recognize and utilize their pattern information is so important to this research question, only those participants who were considered &quot;recovered&quot; by themselves, their families, and their peers, and who had achieved a high degree of integration with their environment, were recruited for this study. Concepts: The concepts implicit in this investigation were traumatic brain injury, pattern manifestation, integrality, and mutual process. Methods: Using the methods of constructivist inquiry, audiotape transcribed interviews were analyzed in a concurrent manner using a hermeneutic dialectic, and a pattern portrait was ultimately constructed. Findings: The final pattern portrait constructed included the following prominent pattern changes: importance and magnitude of physical changes, role of independence vs. interdependence, difficulties of returning to work and integrating into the community, and heightened awareness. Prominent pattern changes noted in this investigation that are uncharacteristic of traumatic brain injury recovery in the literature include recovery time extending to four to six years, and functional gains made long after two years. Significant differences were also noted in the employment patterns of this group of individuals. All individuals were productively engaged before injury, and required three to four years after injury to find synchronous work patterns after injury. Seventy-five percent of the participants who were married at the time of injury were able to sustain their marriages after their injuries. This compares favorably with the higher divorce rates in other brain injury research literature. The individuals who were single at the time of injury characteristically had difficulty establishing independent lifestyles away from home after injury. Synchronous community integration patterns alluded all participants for several years but finally manifested with each individual. Conclusions: The process of living after TBI is complex and diverse. Four pattern areas in particular; overall recovery, family involvement, employability and community integration, remained problematic for many years, even for these individuals. These individuals demonstrated that the changed patterns of living after TBI need to be reconceptualized to incorporate all of the protracted period of recovery they experience, rather than the traditional two years as the current literature suggests. They surpassed all predictive literature estimates for all of the parameters noted above. Their pathway to success needs to be replicated for others. Implications: The implications that can be drawn from this work fall into two categories. The first category consists of implications for nursing. If the nurse is able to develop the ability to &quot;pattern see&quot; and to accurately assess the stage to which an individual's recovery has evolved, the practice methodology of Cowling (2000) might then be utilized in order to best distinguish and decide which services can then be utilized for the individual. The second major category includes those implications that need to be addressed on a societal level through policy development.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:52:21Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:52:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.