2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152851
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adaptation to Diabetes Mellitus
Abstract:
Adaptation to Diabetes Mellitus
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Pollock, Susan, PhDYRD
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
Title:Professor
Human responses to chronic illness vary markedly as do the adaptation outcomes. The purpose of this quantitative research were to: a. identify contributions to nursing science from research utilizing the Adaptation to Chronic Illness model with adult who have diabetes mellitus (DM) and to b. increase awareness of the implications for nursing practice from research findings on DM. The sample consisted of 204 adults, aged 12-55, who had been diagnosed with DM for at least one year. The majority of subjects were female (61%), married (74%), from the two highest social levels (73%), and had been diagnosed with DM for more than ten years. The mean age of the subjects was 41 years and 74% regularly engaged in health promotion activities. Data were collected through interviews and completion of five instruments: Stress Appraisal, Ways of Coping Checklist, Health-Related Hardiness, Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness, and Physiologic Adaptation to Diabetes at three different times, approximately six months apart. Findings included a) Presence of the hardiness characteristic was significantly related to appraisal of diabetes as threatening, the use of problem-focused coping and adaptation in both physiologic domains (r=.76, p=.05); b)the primary appraisal of threat explained 28.6% of the variance for subjects who used problems-focused coping whereas presence of hardiness accounted for 33.4% of the variance in predicting problem-focused coping (stepwise multiple regression): and c) six predictor variables correctly classified 76.7% of the subjects into their respective groups, adaptive or non-adaptive (discriminate analysis). The study provided support for the Adaptation to Chronic Illness model, the indirect effect of hardiness on adaptation and variables that predicted adaptation to DM in both the Physiologic and psychosocial domains. Implications for nursing practice include patients with DM need for developing problem-focused coping skills and self-management skills that focus on hardiness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdaptation to Diabetes Mellitusen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152851-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adaptation to Diabetes Mellitus</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pollock, Susan, PhDYRD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sonsep@ttuhsc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Human responses to chronic illness vary markedly as do the adaptation outcomes. The purpose of this quantitative research were to: a. identify contributions to nursing science from research utilizing the Adaptation to Chronic Illness model with adult who have diabetes mellitus (DM) and to b. increase awareness of the implications for nursing practice from research findings on DM. The sample consisted of 204 adults, aged 12-55, who had been diagnosed with DM for at least one year. The majority of subjects were female (61%), married (74%), from the two highest social levels (73%), and had been diagnosed with DM for more than ten years. The mean age of the subjects was 41 years and 74% regularly engaged in health promotion activities. Data were collected through interviews and completion of five instruments: Stress Appraisal, Ways of Coping Checklist, Health-Related Hardiness, Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness, and Physiologic Adaptation to Diabetes at three different times, approximately six months apart. Findings included a) Presence of the hardiness characteristic was significantly related to appraisal of diabetes as threatening, the use of problem-focused coping and adaptation in both physiologic domains (r=.76, p=.05); b)the primary appraisal of threat explained 28.6% of the variance for subjects who used problems-focused coping whereas presence of hardiness accounted for 33.4% of the variance in predicting problem-focused coping (stepwise multiple regression): and c) six predictor variables correctly classified 76.7% of the subjects into their respective groups, adaptive or non-adaptive (discriminate analysis). The study provided support for the Adaptation to Chronic Illness model, the indirect effect of hardiness on adaptation and variables that predicted adaptation to DM in both the Physiologic and psychosocial domains. Implications for nursing practice include patients with DM need for developing problem-focused coping skills and self-management skills that focus on hardiness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:52:23Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:52:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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