Ecological Factors Influencing Physical Activity of Youth of Parents with Premature Heart Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152852
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ecological Factors Influencing Physical Activity of Youth of Parents with Premature Heart Disease
Abstract:
Ecological Factors Influencing Physical Activity of Youth of Parents with Premature Heart Disease
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Gilmer, Mary, MBA, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Vanderbilt University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: To assess physical activity behaviors and to examine factors influencing physical activity in young adolescent offspring of individuals with premature coronary heart disease. Design: Secondary data analysis of a large, longitudinal study of cardiovascular health in children. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 113 adolescents (11-14 years) with at least one biological parent with premature coronary heart disease living in the home. Used data from 1994 data collection period. Variables: Independent - Age, gender, race, pubertal status, peer physical activity, fathers' physical activity, mothers' education, geographic location, geographic region. Dependent-youths' physical activity. Methods: Components of the Youth Health Survey were administered to youth in public school. Parental questionnaires assessing parental physical activity and health history were mailed to parents of youth and completed at home. Findings: Fathers' physical activity and geographic region main effects revealed that the most active youth had active fathers and were from the piedmont and mountainous regions of the state. Significant statistical interactions suggested that the effect of peer physical activity was modified by both pubertal status and geographic region. Youth were more physically active when they had active peers only when they were in the mid-pubertal level or in the coastal geographic region. Conclusions: Family interventions that promote physical activity in fathers with premature coronary heart disease may be beneficial to offspring as well as affected individuals. Interventions to promote physical activity are needed particularly with more mature youth and those in the coastal region of the state. Implications: Results of this study emphasize the importance of nurses intervening in early adolescence to influence health behaviors of young adolescents, particularly those whose parents have premature heart disease. Youth moving from the concrete stage of cognitive development into a more abstract realm can begin to understand the ramifications of a sedentary lifestyle on their health, which is at increased risk when their parents have premature coronary heart disease (CHD). Interventions during this time afford the nurse an opportunity to minimize health-compromising behaviors in this vulnerable population before they become firmly established. Behaviors as well as physiological alterations associated with adult CHD begin during early adolescence. Interventions, guided by understanding of the influences on physical activity of youth can provide opportunities for these youth to be more active.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEcological Factors Influencing Physical Activity of Youth of Parents with Premature Heart Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152852-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ecological Factors Influencing Physical Activity of Youth of Parents with Premature Heart Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gilmer, Mary, MBA, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Vanderbilt University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maryjo.gilmer@mcmail.vanderbil</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To assess physical activity behaviors and to examine factors influencing physical activity in young adolescent offspring of individuals with premature coronary heart disease. Design: Secondary data analysis of a large, longitudinal study of cardiovascular health in children. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 113 adolescents (11-14 years) with at least one biological parent with premature coronary heart disease living in the home. Used data from 1994 data collection period. Variables: Independent - Age, gender, race, pubertal status, peer physical activity, fathers' physical activity, mothers' education, geographic location, geographic region. Dependent-youths' physical activity. Methods: Components of the Youth Health Survey were administered to youth in public school. Parental questionnaires assessing parental physical activity and health history were mailed to parents of youth and completed at home. Findings: Fathers' physical activity and geographic region main effects revealed that the most active youth had active fathers and were from the piedmont and mountainous regions of the state. Significant statistical interactions suggested that the effect of peer physical activity was modified by both pubertal status and geographic region. Youth were more physically active when they had active peers only when they were in the mid-pubertal level or in the coastal geographic region. Conclusions: Family interventions that promote physical activity in fathers with premature coronary heart disease may be beneficial to offspring as well as affected individuals. Interventions to promote physical activity are needed particularly with more mature youth and those in the coastal region of the state. Implications: Results of this study emphasize the importance of nurses intervening in early adolescence to influence health behaviors of young adolescents, particularly those whose parents have premature heart disease. Youth moving from the concrete stage of cognitive development into a more abstract realm can begin to understand the ramifications of a sedentary lifestyle on their health, which is at increased risk when their parents have premature coronary heart disease (CHD). Interventions during this time afford the nurse an opportunity to minimize health-compromising behaviors in this vulnerable population before they become firmly established. Behaviors as well as physiological alterations associated with adult CHD begin during early adolescence. Interventions, guided by understanding of the influences on physical activity of youth can provide opportunities for these youth to be more active.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:52:26Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:52:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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