2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152855
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Risk Behaviors in Smoking and Non-smoking Young Women: A Comparison
Abstract:
Health Risk Behaviors in Smoking and Non-smoking Young Women: A Comparison
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Kelley, Frances, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Georgetown University
Title:
Objective: The purpose of the research was to compare the health, health risk behaviors and stress levels of young women smokers and non-smokers. Design: Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Forty women aged 18-22 (mean age 20) were paid to participate in an interview and answer questionnaires. Half of the group was active smokers and half were non-smokers. All interviews were conducted by a male interviewer in the same age range. Interviews were conducted in casual settings. All of the women were currently enrolled in higher education. Methods: Interview topics included present and past smoking habits, family smoking patterns, obstacles to quitting and reasons for not smoking. Study tools included: health survey, stages of change tool, Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence, Decisional Balance Scale, and Self-Efficacy Scale for smokers. Non-smokers completed the health survey and all women completed the Derogatis Stress Profile. Findings: Qualitative data was examined with frequency distributions and by identifying themes. The majority of the smokers began smoking at age 14 or younger, smoked less than 10 cigarettes/day, and had family members who smoked. Eighty-six percent felt that smoking was hazardous to their health. Twenty women identified social situations involving alcohol as the time they would most likely smoke. The biggest obstacle to quitting was being around other smokers. These young women stated they did not smoke when ill and all were interested in quitting smoking sometime in the future. In the comparison of smokers and non-smokers, there were significant differences in exercise, drug use and siblings who smoked. The non-smokers exercised more, used less drugs, and had fewer siblings who smoked. There were no significant differences between the two groups in weight, alcohol use and parental smoking behaviors. Conclusions: These results suggest that young women may be willing to stop smoking. These young women are light smokers with low dependence levels and a strong desire to quit. The differences between women who smoke and those who do not smoke are few. Implications: Nurses who work with young women have the opportunity to intervene and encourage smoking cessation when these young women are ill. Drinking alcoholic beverages, social situations and peer smoking were identified as the largest obstacles to quitting. Interventions targeted to these situations should be implemented. Smoking cessation at this age has dramatic implications for future health benefits.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Risk Behaviors in Smoking and Non-smoking Young Women: A Comparisonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152855-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Risk Behaviors in Smoking and Non-smoking Young Women: A Comparison</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kelley, Frances, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgetown University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kelleyj@Georgetown.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of the research was to compare the health, health risk behaviors and stress levels of young women smokers and non-smokers. Design: Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Forty women aged 18-22 (mean age 20) were paid to participate in an interview and answer questionnaires. Half of the group was active smokers and half were non-smokers. All interviews were conducted by a male interviewer in the same age range. Interviews were conducted in casual settings. All of the women were currently enrolled in higher education. Methods: Interview topics included present and past smoking habits, family smoking patterns, obstacles to quitting and reasons for not smoking. Study tools included: health survey, stages of change tool, Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence, Decisional Balance Scale, and Self-Efficacy Scale for smokers. Non-smokers completed the health survey and all women completed the Derogatis Stress Profile. Findings: Qualitative data was examined with frequency distributions and by identifying themes. The majority of the smokers began smoking at age 14 or younger, smoked less than 10 cigarettes/day, and had family members who smoked. Eighty-six percent felt that smoking was hazardous to their health. Twenty women identified social situations involving alcohol as the time they would most likely smoke. The biggest obstacle to quitting was being around other smokers. These young women stated they did not smoke when ill and all were interested in quitting smoking sometime in the future. In the comparison of smokers and non-smokers, there were significant differences in exercise, drug use and siblings who smoked. The non-smokers exercised more, used less drugs, and had fewer siblings who smoked. There were no significant differences between the two groups in weight, alcohol use and parental smoking behaviors. Conclusions: These results suggest that young women may be willing to stop smoking. These young women are light smokers with low dependence levels and a strong desire to quit. The differences between women who smoke and those who do not smoke are few. Implications: Nurses who work with young women have the opportunity to intervene and encourage smoking cessation when these young women are ill. Drinking alcoholic beverages, social situations and peer smoking were identified as the largest obstacles to quitting. Interventions targeted to these situations should be implemented. Smoking cessation at this age has dramatic implications for future health benefits.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:52:33Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:52:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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