Family Functioning: First Three Months of A Member’s Ovarian Cancer Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152857
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Functioning: First Three Months of A Member’s Ovarian Cancer Experience
Abstract:
Family Functioning: First Three Months of A Member’s Ovarian Cancer Experience
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Koldjeski, Dixie
P.I. Institution Name:East Carolina University
Objective: Identify the impact of ovarian cancer on socio-emotional responses, coping, and needs of families having a member with ovarian cancer. Coping with cancer for families is a global problem and needs multiple perspectives from which cross-cultural concepts for support and management can be developed. Design: Experiential research mixed-model longitudinal design used over the first year after diagnosis occurred. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Families which had a member diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Sample: 18 families. Setting: Southeastern United States. Years: 1997-2000. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The lived experience of families as provided by family members and the variables of socio-emotional responses, coping strategies, and needs. Methods: Semistructured interviews and questionnaire data were collected 1-2 weeks after the diagnosis, at six weeks, and three months to obtain information about the multiple realities families were facing. Triangulation strategies were used to analyze the qualitative and quantitative data in order to achieve “wholeness of experiences”. They include thematic analysis, descriptive statistics, contextual validations, and identification of congruencies and incongruencies. Data were consensual responses on questionnaire data and interview data. Field notes were taken by interviewer; members checked for accuracy and made corrections. A narrative of the interview was written by the interviewer immediately after each visit. Findings: Optimism was strong in both thematic and questionnaire data and was based on belief that ovarian cancer was curable through medical science combined with faith in God. Anger about the impersonal treatment patients and families received in the health care system and professionals was expressed quite vehemently in interviews, but not rated as high on the concept scale. This suggests that members may have been reluctant to show anger on the rating scale but felt more comfortable doing so in interviews. Major coping strategies used by families were having faith in God, confronting problems directly, seeking support from family and friends, and having a strong family which could manage situations. Family needs focused on participating in treatment processes, wanting professionals to provide ongoing information about treatment effectiveness and symptom management, and expecting health professionals to provide support, respect, and understanding in a caring way about the sick member’s needs. The perception by families of a lack of or incomplete information generated information-seeking activities from the Internet, cancer centers, media, and other patients. Conclusions: The ovarian cancer experience is a family affair. Families want to be full participants in the treatment process and expect professionals to make this possible by providing ongoing information about treatment effectiveness. They need competent and caring health professionals to help them understand what is happening, assist them with symptom management, and provide respect and consideration in scheduling appointments, outpatient treatments, and information. Implications: This project provides evidence-based research on which to make clinical decisions and actions more specific in providing care to families with a member having ovarian cancer. A family approach to care and management of women with this diagnosis is essential, as this is the setting in which most health care is provided around the world. Health professionals need to work collaboratively with family members and use counseling strategies that strengthen family support and relationship development. Professional nurses need to be caring and competent to provide knowledge and symptom management strategies as well as helping the family as a unit to maintain and use its strengths to maintain the health of all members. This research provides a basis for cross-cultural comparisons about family management of a serious illness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Functioning: First Three Months of A Member’s Ovarian Cancer Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152857-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Functioning: First Three Months of A Member&rsquo;s Ovarian Cancer Experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Koldjeski, Dixie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">East Carolina University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">koldjeskid@mail.ecu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Identify the impact of ovarian cancer on socio-emotional responses, coping, and needs of families having a member with ovarian cancer. Coping with cancer for families is a global problem and needs multiple perspectives from which cross-cultural concepts for support and management can be developed. Design: Experiential research mixed-model longitudinal design used over the first year after diagnosis occurred. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Families which had a member diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Sample: 18 families. Setting: Southeastern United States. Years: 1997-2000. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The lived experience of families as provided by family members and the variables of socio-emotional responses, coping strategies, and needs. Methods: Semistructured interviews and questionnaire data were collected 1-2 weeks after the diagnosis, at six weeks, and three months to obtain information about the multiple realities families were facing. Triangulation strategies were used to analyze the qualitative and quantitative data in order to achieve &ldquo;wholeness of experiences&rdquo;. They include thematic analysis, descriptive statistics, contextual validations, and identification of congruencies and incongruencies. Data were consensual responses on questionnaire data and interview data. Field notes were taken by interviewer; members checked for accuracy and made corrections. A narrative of the interview was written by the interviewer immediately after each visit. Findings: Optimism was strong in both thematic and questionnaire data and was based on belief that ovarian cancer was curable through medical science combined with faith in God. Anger about the impersonal treatment patients and families received in the health care system and professionals was expressed quite vehemently in interviews, but not rated as high on the concept scale. This suggests that members may have been reluctant to show anger on the rating scale but felt more comfortable doing so in interviews. Major coping strategies used by families were having faith in God, confronting problems directly, seeking support from family and friends, and having a strong family which could manage situations. Family needs focused on participating in treatment processes, wanting professionals to provide ongoing information about treatment effectiveness and symptom management, and expecting health professionals to provide support, respect, and understanding in a caring way about the sick member&rsquo;s needs. The perception by families of a lack of or incomplete information generated information-seeking activities from the Internet, cancer centers, media, and other patients. Conclusions: The ovarian cancer experience is a family affair. Families want to be full participants in the treatment process and expect professionals to make this possible by providing ongoing information about treatment effectiveness. They need competent and caring health professionals to help them understand what is happening, assist them with symptom management, and provide respect and consideration in scheduling appointments, outpatient treatments, and information. Implications: This project provides evidence-based research on which to make clinical decisions and actions more specific in providing care to families with a member having ovarian cancer. A family approach to care and management of women with this diagnosis is essential, as this is the setting in which most health care is provided around the world. Health professionals need to work collaboratively with family members and use counseling strategies that strengthen family support and relationship development. Professional nurses need to be caring and competent to provide knowledge and symptom management strategies as well as helping the family as a unit to maintain and use its strengths to maintain the health of all members. This research provides a basis for cross-cultural comparisons about family management of a serious illness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:52:37Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:52:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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