Subjective Strain of Care Experienced by Nurses in Caring for Delirious Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152866
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Subjective Strain of Care Experienced by Nurses in Caring for Delirious Patients
Abstract:
Subjective Strain of Care Experienced by Nurses in Caring for Delirious Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Milisen, Koen
P.I. Institution Name:Center for Health Service & Nursing
Objective: Delirium in hospitalized patients has been recognized as a major risk factor for poor clinical outcome and increased healthcare costs. Caring for delirious patients can be hypothesized to be a great cause of stress for healthcare providers. The purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' perceptions of the strain of care in caring for delirious hospitalized patients. Design: In this study a cross-sectional, descriptive design was used. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample of 185 nurses working with delirious patients at the Catholic University Hospital of Leuven, Belgium were included in this study. These nurses were a mean of 43.7 years old (SD=7.5), the majority was female (77.7%), and had an average job experience in nursing of 13.01 years (SD=7.6). Of the 185 nurses who filled out the Strain of Care for Delirium Index (SCDI), 31.4%, 21.6%, 19.5%, 10.8%, 8.6% and 8.1% nurses worked on a surgical, emergency, geriatric, medical, psychiatric department and intensive care unit, respectively. Variables Studied Together: The SCDI is a 20-item instrument, developed and used to measure the strain of care nurses experience in caring for delirious patients. This instrument is known to have a four-factor structure related to 1) hypoactive delirious behavior, 2) hypoalert delirious behavior, 3) fluctuating course of the delirium and psychotic-neurotic behavior and 4) hyperactive/hyperalert delirious behavior. The independent variables related to the strain of care were nurses' demographic data, i.e.: gender, age, level of nursing education, employment status, shift worked, years of experience as a nurse, current job position, years of experience at the current nursing-unit and in-service training. Methods: Data were analyzed with the Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test and Ridit analysis (R). Ridit analysis is a statistical method to compare distributions of ordinal variables in different groups. Findings: All nurses perceived a higher strain of care dealing with the hyperactive/hyperalert delirious behavior compared to dealing with the hypoactive and hypoalert delirious behavior of patients (p<0.006). Further analysis revealed that female nurses experienced more strain of care in dealing with delirious behavior compared to their male colleagues (p<0.05), and this for all factors of the SCDI. Nurses working at a geriatric, medical or a surgical unit, nurses <30 years of age and nurses working during day-time shifts perceived more difficulty in dealing with the hypoactive and hypoalert behavior of the patients compared to nurses working on other units, their older colleagues and those working night-time shifts (p<0.009). Nurses working night shifts experienced more strain of care while taking care of the hyperactive/hyperalert behavior of the delirious patients compared to their colleagues working during the day (p<0.001). Nurses working at a geriatric, medical or surgical unit perceived more difficulty dealing with the fluctuating course and the psychotic-neurotic behavior of the patients compared to nurses from other units (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Based on these findings young female nurses and nurses working in geriatric, medical and surgical wards experience a high strain of care in dealing with delirious hospitalized patients. Especially the hyperactive/hyperalert behaviors of delirious patients are major stressors for nurses. Implications: This study confirms that delirious patients are a stressful population to care for. Educational programs, interventions improving the management of delirium and the impact of these programs on the strain of care, should be the aim of future investigations. Because nurses are the key figures in caring for delirious patients, it can be hypothesized that decreasing nurses' strain in caring for this patient population is an important element in guaranteeing that these patients receive adequate care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSubjective Strain of Care Experienced by Nurses in Caring for Delirious Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152866-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Subjective Strain of Care Experienced by Nurses in Caring for Delirious Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Milisen, Koen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Center for Health Service &amp; Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">koen.milisen@med.kuleuven.ac.b</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Delirium in hospitalized patients has been recognized as a major risk factor for poor clinical outcome and increased healthcare costs. Caring for delirious patients can be hypothesized to be a great cause of stress for healthcare providers. The purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' perceptions of the strain of care in caring for delirious hospitalized patients. Design: In this study a cross-sectional, descriptive design was used. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample of 185 nurses working with delirious patients at the Catholic University Hospital of Leuven, Belgium were included in this study. These nurses were a mean of 43.7 years old (SD=7.5), the majority was female (77.7%), and had an average job experience in nursing of 13.01 years (SD=7.6). Of the 185 nurses who filled out the Strain of Care for Delirium Index (SCDI), 31.4%, 21.6%, 19.5%, 10.8%, 8.6% and 8.1% nurses worked on a surgical, emergency, geriatric, medical, psychiatric department and intensive care unit, respectively. Variables Studied Together: The SCDI is a 20-item instrument, developed and used to measure the strain of care nurses experience in caring for delirious patients. This instrument is known to have a four-factor structure related to 1) hypoactive delirious behavior, 2) hypoalert delirious behavior, 3) fluctuating course of the delirium and psychotic-neurotic behavior and 4) hyperactive/hyperalert delirious behavior. The independent variables related to the strain of care were nurses' demographic data, i.e.: gender, age, level of nursing education, employment status, shift worked, years of experience as a nurse, current job position, years of experience at the current nursing-unit and in-service training. Methods: Data were analyzed with the Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test and Ridit analysis (R). Ridit analysis is a statistical method to compare distributions of ordinal variables in different groups. Findings: All nurses perceived a higher strain of care dealing with the hyperactive/hyperalert delirious behavior compared to dealing with the hypoactive and hypoalert delirious behavior of patients (p&lt;0.006). Further analysis revealed that female nurses experienced more strain of care in dealing with delirious behavior compared to their male colleagues (p&lt;0.05), and this for all factors of the SCDI. Nurses working at a geriatric, medical or a surgical unit, nurses &lt;30 years of age and nurses working during day-time shifts perceived more difficulty in dealing with the hypoactive and hypoalert behavior of the patients compared to nurses working on other units, their older colleagues and those working night-time shifts (p&lt;0.009). Nurses working night shifts experienced more strain of care while taking care of the hyperactive/hyperalert behavior of the delirious patients compared to their colleagues working during the day (p&lt;0.001). Nurses working at a geriatric, medical or surgical unit perceived more difficulty dealing with the fluctuating course and the psychotic-neurotic behavior of the patients compared to nurses from other units (p &lt; 0.001). Conclusions: Based on these findings young female nurses and nurses working in geriatric, medical and surgical wards experience a high strain of care in dealing with delirious hospitalized patients. Especially the hyperactive/hyperalert behaviors of delirious patients are major stressors for nurses. Implications: This study confirms that delirious patients are a stressful population to care for. Educational programs, interventions improving the management of delirium and the impact of these programs on the strain of care, should be the aim of future investigations. Because nurses are the key figures in caring for delirious patients, it can be hypothesized that decreasing nurses' strain in caring for this patient population is an important element in guaranteeing that these patients receive adequate care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:52:59Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:52:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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