Effect of Infant Massage on Parenting Effectiveness in Substance-Abusing Mothers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152868
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Infant Massage on Parenting Effectiveness in Substance-Abusing Mothers
Abstract:
Effect of Infant Massage on Parenting Effectiveness in Substance-Abusing Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Porter, Luz
P.I. Institution Name:Florida International University
Objective: This study sought to determine whether the practice of infant massage would improve mothers’ parenting effectiveness. It was hypothesized that recovering substance abusing mothers (SAMs) who practice infant massage daily have less parental stress, more hope, and stronger maternal-infant attachment than those mothers who do not. Design: The study used the pre-test-post-test control group design with a convenience sample of 40 SAMs. Mothers were randomly assigned to Group 1 (parenting enhancement + infant massage (PEIM)) or group 2 (parenting enhancement only (PE)) in sets of 5 until each study group had 20 subjects. Both groups received the usual health care services provided in the clinic. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: All SAMs in Miami-Dade County, Florida comprised the target population. The sample was recruited from among recovering SAMs registered in drug rehabilitation programs offered in 2 community-based agencies in Miami. Recovering SAMs in both study sites were considered for potential inclusion in the study regardless of age, ethnicity, marital status, religion, education, and income level. However, said SAMs who could not follow direction or maintain attention were excluded. Each subject signed an informed consent prior to data collection. This pilot study was done in 1998-2000. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Infant massage (IM), the intervention, was added to parenting enhancement class. Group 1 SAMs learned to do IM by part over a three-week period and did the whole procedure by the forth week of the study period. Outcome variables were parental stress, hope, and maternal-infant attachment, respectively measured with Abidin’s Parental Stress Index (1996), Herth’s Hope Scale (1992), and Mueller’s Maternal-Infant Attachment Inventory-Revised (1994). Methods: Subject recruitment and selection started once IRB approval of the research protocol was obtained. Group 1 SAMs, along with their infants, participated in 4 weekly PEIM classes, 2 hours long, including two 15-minute breaks, and learned to do IM in a systematic fashion. They practiced IM for 10 minutes in the morning and in the evening throughout the study period. Group 2 SAMs participated in 4 weekly PE classes without IM, alternating with the PEIM group. Classes were held at a mutually agreed time and place. Data were collected 1 week before the first class and 1 week after the last class. Data analyses included descriptive and inferential statistics; confidence level was set at p = .05. Findings: Group 1 SAMs and Group 2 SAMs differed in hope and maternal-infant attachment (p>.05). The two groups did not differ in parental stress. Qualitative comments suggest the positive impact of IM on SAMs’ self-esteem and their interaction with the infant. Conclusion: Study findings strongly suggest that the effectiveness of IM in enhancing parenting skills of recovering SAMs. However, the findings must be interpreted with caution. Implications: Infant massage has the potential for making mothers aware that babies are sensitive human beings, deserving respect, tenderness, warmth, and a listening heart. Further testing of the hypotheses is in order; the study should be replicated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Infant Massage on Parenting Effectiveness in Substance-Abusing Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152868-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Infant Massage on Parenting Effectiveness in Substance-Abusing Mothers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Porter, Luz</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida International University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">porter1@fiu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study sought to determine whether the practice of infant massage would improve mothers&rsquo; parenting effectiveness. It was hypothesized that recovering substance abusing mothers (SAMs) who practice infant massage daily have less parental stress, more hope, and stronger maternal-infant attachment than those mothers who do not. Design: The study used the pre-test-post-test control group design with a convenience sample of 40 SAMs. Mothers were randomly assigned to Group 1 (parenting enhancement + infant massage (PEIM)) or group 2 (parenting enhancement only (PE)) in sets of 5 until each study group had 20 subjects. Both groups received the usual health care services provided in the clinic. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: All SAMs in Miami-Dade County, Florida comprised the target population. The sample was recruited from among recovering SAMs registered in drug rehabilitation programs offered in 2 community-based agencies in Miami. Recovering SAMs in both study sites were considered for potential inclusion in the study regardless of age, ethnicity, marital status, religion, education, and income level. However, said SAMs who could not follow direction or maintain attention were excluded. Each subject signed an informed consent prior to data collection. This pilot study was done in 1998-2000. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Infant massage (IM), the intervention, was added to parenting enhancement class. Group 1 SAMs learned to do IM by part over a three-week period and did the whole procedure by the forth week of the study period. Outcome variables were parental stress, hope, and maternal-infant attachment, respectively measured with Abidin&rsquo;s Parental Stress Index (1996), Herth&rsquo;s Hope Scale (1992), and Mueller&rsquo;s Maternal-Infant Attachment Inventory-Revised (1994). Methods: Subject recruitment and selection started once IRB approval of the research protocol was obtained. Group 1 SAMs, along with their infants, participated in 4 weekly PEIM classes, 2 hours long, including two 15-minute breaks, and learned to do IM in a systematic fashion. They practiced IM for 10 minutes in the morning and in the evening throughout the study period. Group 2 SAMs participated in 4 weekly PE classes without IM, alternating with the PEIM group. Classes were held at a mutually agreed time and place. Data were collected 1 week before the first class and 1 week after the last class. Data analyses included descriptive and inferential statistics; confidence level was set at p = .05. Findings: Group 1 SAMs and Group 2 SAMs differed in hope and maternal-infant attachment (p&gt;.05). The two groups did not differ in parental stress. Qualitative comments suggest the positive impact of IM on SAMs&rsquo; self-esteem and their interaction with the infant. Conclusion: Study findings strongly suggest that the effectiveness of IM in enhancing parenting skills of recovering SAMs. However, the findings must be interpreted with caution. Implications: Infant massage has the potential for making mothers aware that babies are sensitive human beings, deserving respect, tenderness, warmth, and a listening heart. Further testing of the hypotheses is in order; the study should be replicated.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:03Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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