2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152869
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sexual Health Practices of Homeless/Street Adolescents
Abstract:
Sexual Health Practices of Homeless/Street Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Rew, Lynn
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at Austin
Objective: To describe sexual health practices of homeless/street adolescents, examine relationships among variables in a conceptual model, and identify indirect and direct effects of these variables on the outcome of sexual health practices. Design: A descriptive, exploratory design was used. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: From population of homeless/street youth served by a street outreach program in central Texas in 1999-2000, a convenience sample of 414 youth aged 16-20 years (M = 18.5, S.D. = 1.2 years) was obtained. The majority (58.9%) were male, Caucasian (75.5%), and heterosexual (61.4%). Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Sociodemographics, sexual history, culture of homelessness, future time perspective [FTP] , intentions to use condoms [IUC] , self-efficacy to use condoms [SEUC], social support [SS], social connectedness [SC], AIDS knowledge [AK], perceived health status [PHS], and assertive communication [AC]. Outcome variables were risky sexual behavior [RSB] and safe sex behaviors (SSB). Methods: Participants recruited by director of street outreach program who administered a paper-pencil survey [valid instruments measuring sociodemographics, sexual history, culture of homelessness, FTP (a = .75 ), IUC (a = .67), SEUC (a = .76 ), SS (a = .81 ), SC (a = .71), AK (a = .96 ), PHS (a = .64), AC (a = .62 ), RSB (a =.64 ), and SSB (a =.62 ). Participants were paid $10 and given a snack. Findings: Nearly half (46.9%) reported a history of sexual abuse and 35.2% reported sexual orientation as homosexual or bisexual; 31.9% had been tested and 7% treated for AIDS and 7%; 30.1% had received all three immunizations for hepatitis B. Significant relationships were found between the outcome of SSB and age (r=-.10, p=.05), time away from home (r=-.10, p=.05), FTP (r=-.21, p=.01), SC (r=.14, p=.01), PHS (r=.17, p=.01), SEUC (r=.39, p<.01), IUC (r=.39, p<.01), AC (r=.32, p<.01), and RSB (r=.24, p=.01). Path analysis confirmed statistically significant (p<.001) correlations among safe sex behaviors, intentions to use condoms, self-efficacy to use condoms, social support, social connectedness, and risky sexual behaviors with the exception of social connectedness and intentions to use condoms (r=-.021, p=.68). A parsimonious model with good fit (CFI > .95) indicated that the only directional paths to SSB were from AC (beta=.20) and IUC (beta=.32); the only directional paths to RSB were from AC (beta=.24) and SS (beta=.34). AC was predicted from SS (beta=.43) and SC (beta=.11), between which the non-directional path (beta=.25) was statistically significant. No other directional or non-directional paths were significant with alpha = .05. Thus, any impact of social support, social connectedness or self-efficacy to use condoms on safe sex behaviors was mediated by assertive communication and intentions to use condoms. The impact of social support and intentions to use condoms on risky sexual behavior was mediated by assertive communication and self-efficacy to use condoms. The final model did not require correlation between SSB and RSB, thus the relationship between them can be accounted for by the other variables in the model. Conclusions: Safe sexual health practices of homeless/street adolescents are best understood by complex relationships among cognitive-perceptual factors and behaviors that reflect their communication with others as well as their intentions and self-efficacy to use condoms. Implications: Homeless/street youth may benefit from interventions that focus on cognitive-perceptual and interpersonal behavioral factors that influence safe sex behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSexual Health Practices of Homeless/Street Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152869-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sexual Health Practices of Homeless/Street Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rew, Lynn</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at Austin</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ellerew@mail.utexas.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To describe sexual health practices of homeless/street adolescents, examine relationships among variables in a conceptual model, and identify indirect and direct effects of these variables on the outcome of sexual health practices. Design: A descriptive, exploratory design was used. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: From population of homeless/street youth served by a street outreach program in central Texas in 1999-2000, a convenience sample of 414 youth aged 16-20 years (M = 18.5, S.D. = 1.2 years) was obtained. The majority (58.9%) were male, Caucasian (75.5%), and heterosexual (61.4%). Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Sociodemographics, sexual history, culture of homelessness, future time perspective [FTP] , intentions to use condoms [IUC] , self-efficacy to use condoms [SEUC], social support [SS], social connectedness [SC], AIDS knowledge [AK], perceived health status [PHS], and assertive communication [AC]. Outcome variables were risky sexual behavior [RSB] and safe sex behaviors (SSB). Methods: Participants recruited by director of street outreach program who administered a paper-pencil survey [valid instruments measuring sociodemographics, sexual history, culture of homelessness, FTP (a = .75 ), IUC (a = .67), SEUC (a = .76 ), SS (a = .81 ), SC (a = .71), AK (a = .96 ), PHS (a = .64), AC (a = .62 ), RSB (a =.64 ), and SSB (a =.62 ). Participants were paid $10 and given a snack. Findings: Nearly half (46.9%) reported a history of sexual abuse and 35.2% reported sexual orientation as homosexual or bisexual; 31.9% had been tested and 7% treated for AIDS and 7%; 30.1% had received all three immunizations for hepatitis B. Significant relationships were found between the outcome of SSB and age (r=-.10, p=.05), time away from home (r=-.10, p=.05), FTP (r=-.21, p=.01), SC (r=.14, p=.01), PHS (r=.17, p=.01), SEUC (r=.39, p&lt;.01), IUC (r=.39, p&lt;.01), AC (r=.32, p&lt;.01), and RSB (r=.24, p=.01). Path analysis confirmed statistically significant (p&lt;.001) correlations among safe sex behaviors, intentions to use condoms, self-efficacy to use condoms, social support, social connectedness, and risky sexual behaviors with the exception of social connectedness and intentions to use condoms (r=-.021, p=.68). A parsimonious model with good fit (CFI &gt; .95) indicated that the only directional paths to SSB were from AC (beta=.20) and IUC (beta=.32); the only directional paths to RSB were from AC (beta=.24) and SS (beta=.34). AC was predicted from SS (beta=.43) and SC (beta=.11), between which the non-directional path (beta=.25) was statistically significant. No other directional or non-directional paths were significant with alpha = .05. Thus, any impact of social support, social connectedness or self-efficacy to use condoms on safe sex behaviors was mediated by assertive communication and intentions to use condoms. The impact of social support and intentions to use condoms on risky sexual behavior was mediated by assertive communication and self-efficacy to use condoms. The final model did not require correlation between SSB and RSB, thus the relationship between them can be accounted for by the other variables in the model. Conclusions: Safe sexual health practices of homeless/street adolescents are best understood by complex relationships among cognitive-perceptual factors and behaviors that reflect their communication with others as well as their intentions and self-efficacy to use condoms. Implications: Homeless/street youth may benefit from interventions that focus on cognitive-perceptual and interpersonal behavioral factors that influence safe sex behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:08Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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