2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152871
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coping: Reconceptualization and Measurement
Abstract:
Coping: Reconceptualization and Measurement
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Roy, Callista
P.I. Institution Name:Boston College
Objective: The purposes of this presentation are: 1) to clarify the concept of coping for clinical usefulness and scholarship within a nursing perspective; 2) to describe the development of an instrument to measure the derived variable; and 3) to describe the psychometric properties of the instrument. Design: Three-phase multimethod instrument development. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Phase 1-Adult patients (n=86); Phase 3-Adults (n=650). Concept: Coping has received much attention as a variable for nursing knowledge development, but most instrument development stems from the work of psychologists such as Lazarus and colleagues (Wegman, 1988; Lazarus, 1998). An alternative conceptual approach, based on a distinct nursing perspective was used to develop an instrument on cognitive adaptation processing. A central construct of the Roy Adaptation Model of nursing is the cognator, the subsystem of the person for developing cognitive and emotional strategies to cope with the changing environment (Roy & Andrews, 1999). Methods: Phase 1 was qualitative and identified how the cognator coping processes acted to promote adaptation and how they related to the four adaptive modes (n=86 adult patients). A total of 41 different coping strategies were identified from interviews and case recordings. In Phase 2, deductive work supported by clinical observations in neuroscience nursing provided a typology of 24 information-processing strategies. Based on theoretical work (Roy & Roberts, 1981) and further empirical work (Roy, 1989), the two sets of identified cognitive-emotional strategies for coping were synthesized. A survey instrument of 72 items was derived to measure specific cognitive coping strategies and to explore patterns of strategies. Phase 3 involved testing and refining the instrument with three samples (n=650). Findings: The finalized 37 item, Likert-type scale, the Cognitive Adaptation Processing Scale (CAPS) has two factors, identifying two major patterns of coping: 1) Clear and Flexible (CF) and 2) Diffuse and Fixed (DF). In pre-testing, subjects noted that the questionnaire was interesting, clear, and readable. The construct validity is based on its derivation from the Roy Model work. In pilot work, the CAPS shows a normal distribution and a tendency to correlate in predicted ways with other variables. In one study (Zahn, 1994), the CAPS scores explained 42% of the variance in self-consistency in a sample of elderly with hearing impairment (n=128). Using data from this study, consistency for the total scale indicated a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of .85 (p<.01). Based on a principal component (PC) extraction with a varimax rotation (n=458) of the 37 items, the two factors obtained had Eigen values of 7.6 and 3.9 and factor loadings ranging from .33 to .73. The criteria for the factor solutions are well within the conventions of statistical analysis (Kachigan, 1986). The two factors (CF Alpha=.89 p<.01 an DF Alpha=.80 p<.01) explained 31.1% of the variance. Conclusion: The CAPS is a valid, reliable instrument to measure coping for nursing purposes. The usefulness of the conceptualization was supported in a recent critical analysis and synthesis of 163 published research projects (BBARNS, 2000). Implications: The Roy Adaptation Model of nursing provides a theoretical approach to cognitive and emotional coping that is useful for nursing practice and provides a basis for clinical scholarship.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoping: Reconceptualization and Measurementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152871-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Coping: Reconceptualization and Measurement</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roy, Callista</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boston College</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">callista.roy.1@bc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purposes of this presentation are: 1) to clarify the concept of coping for clinical usefulness and scholarship within a nursing perspective; 2) to describe the development of an instrument to measure the derived variable; and 3) to describe the psychometric properties of the instrument. Design: Three-phase multimethod instrument development. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Phase 1-Adult patients (n=86); Phase 3-Adults (n=650). Concept: Coping has received much attention as a variable for nursing knowledge development, but most instrument development stems from the work of psychologists such as Lazarus and colleagues (Wegman, 1988; Lazarus, 1998). An alternative conceptual approach, based on a distinct nursing perspective was used to develop an instrument on cognitive adaptation processing. A central construct of the Roy Adaptation Model of nursing is the cognator, the subsystem of the person for developing cognitive and emotional strategies to cope with the changing environment (Roy &amp; Andrews, 1999). Methods: Phase 1 was qualitative and identified how the cognator coping processes acted to promote adaptation and how they related to the four adaptive modes (n=86 adult patients). A total of 41 different coping strategies were identified from interviews and case recordings. In Phase 2, deductive work supported by clinical observations in neuroscience nursing provided a typology of 24 information-processing strategies. Based on theoretical work (Roy &amp; Roberts, 1981) and further empirical work (Roy, 1989), the two sets of identified cognitive-emotional strategies for coping were synthesized. A survey instrument of 72 items was derived to measure specific cognitive coping strategies and to explore patterns of strategies. Phase 3 involved testing and refining the instrument with three samples (n=650). Findings: The finalized 37 item, Likert-type scale, the Cognitive Adaptation Processing Scale (CAPS) has two factors, identifying two major patterns of coping: 1) Clear and Flexible (CF) and 2) Diffuse and Fixed (DF). In pre-testing, subjects noted that the questionnaire was interesting, clear, and readable. The construct validity is based on its derivation from the Roy Model work. In pilot work, the CAPS shows a normal distribution and a tendency to correlate in predicted ways with other variables. In one study (Zahn, 1994), the CAPS scores explained 42% of the variance in self-consistency in a sample of elderly with hearing impairment (n=128). Using data from this study, consistency for the total scale indicated a Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha coefficient of .85 (p&lt;.01). Based on a principal component (PC) extraction with a varimax rotation (n=458) of the 37 items, the two factors obtained had Eigen values of 7.6 and 3.9 and factor loadings ranging from .33 to .73. The criteria for the factor solutions are well within the conventions of statistical analysis (Kachigan, 1986). The two factors (CF Alpha=.89 p&lt;.01 an DF Alpha=.80 p&lt;.01) explained 31.1% of the variance. Conclusion: The CAPS is a valid, reliable instrument to measure coping for nursing purposes. The usefulness of the conceptualization was supported in a recent critical analysis and synthesis of 163 published research projects (BBARNS, 2000). Implications: The Roy Adaptation Model of nursing provides a theoretical approach to cognitive and emotional coping that is useful for nursing practice and provides a basis for clinical scholarship.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:12Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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