2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152874
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ethnic Variations in Resiliency Among Hemodialysis Patients and Caregivers
Abstract:
Ethnic Variations in Resiliency Among Hemodialysis Patients and Caregivers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:White, Nancy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Northern Colorado
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine differences in family resiliency between hemodialysis patients and caregivers across three ethnically diverse groups: Anglo-Americans, Mexican-Americans and Koreans from the Province of Iksan. Design: This study was guided by a descriptive, comparative design. Population, Sample, Setting, and Years: The study was based on a convenience sample of ESRD patients from one of three-dialysis center (two US and one in Korea). A total of 68 patient surveys (35 Anglo-Americans, 20 Mexican-Americans, and 13 Koreans) and 58 caregiver surveys (31 Anglo-Americans, 11 Mexican-Americans, and 16 Koreans) were returned. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The study is based upon the Family Resiliency Model (McCubbin et al, 1997), which explains the positive behavioral patterns, and functional competence that individuals and families demonstrate under stressful or adverse conditions. Stressors associated with ESRD and hemodialysis were measured using a modified Demands of Illness Inventory (Woods et al, 1987). Components of the Family Resiliency Model were measured using Relative and Friend Support, Social Support, Family Coping-Coherence, Family Hardiness, and Family Member Well-Being (McCubbin, 1997). Methods: Patients completed a language appropriate survey and were asked to take a survey home to their primary caregiver. Findings: Results of the MANOVA for the patient data indicated significant ethnic differences on seven of the Demands of Illness subscales, Social Support, Family Coping-Coherence, Family Hardiness and Family Well-Being. Results of the caregiver analysis indicated significant differences by ethnic group on all variables except Problems with the Providers (Subscale 8 of the Demands of Illness). Student Newman-Keuls post hoc comparisons were examined. In the patient group, the Anglo-Americans demonstrated more Social Support and less impact by the Demands of the Medical Treatment than the Koreans and Mexican-Americans. The Koreans consistently scored lower on Family Coping-Coherence, Family Hardiness, Family Well-Being and higher on most of the Demands of Illness subscales. For the caregiver groups, the Koreans were generally less resilient than the US groups, but were more similar to the Mexican-Americans on Family Well-Being, Personal Meaning of the Illness, and impact of the disease on income, time and energy. Conclusions: Cultural interpretations are offered to explain these differences. Implications: Qualitative research is currently underway to provide greater understanding of these cultural variations. Understanding the experience of families in this situation may provide a prototype for the experience within a broader context of chronic illness management.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEthnic Variations in Resiliency Among Hemodialysis Patients and Caregiversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152874-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ethnic Variations in Resiliency Among Hemodialysis Patients and Caregivers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">White, Nancy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Northern Colorado</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nwhite@unco.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine differences in family resiliency between hemodialysis patients and caregivers across three ethnically diverse groups: Anglo-Americans, Mexican-Americans and Koreans from the Province of Iksan. Design: This study was guided by a descriptive, comparative design. Population, Sample, Setting, and Years: The study was based on a convenience sample of ESRD patients from one of three-dialysis center (two US and one in Korea). A total of 68 patient surveys (35 Anglo-Americans, 20 Mexican-Americans, and 13 Koreans) and 58 caregiver surveys (31 Anglo-Americans, 11 Mexican-Americans, and 16 Koreans) were returned. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The study is based upon the Family Resiliency Model (McCubbin et al, 1997), which explains the positive behavioral patterns, and functional competence that individuals and families demonstrate under stressful or adverse conditions. Stressors associated with ESRD and hemodialysis were measured using a modified Demands of Illness Inventory (Woods et al, 1987). Components of the Family Resiliency Model were measured using Relative and Friend Support, Social Support, Family Coping-Coherence, Family Hardiness, and Family Member Well-Being (McCubbin, 1997). Methods: Patients completed a language appropriate survey and were asked to take a survey home to their primary caregiver. Findings: Results of the MANOVA for the patient data indicated significant ethnic differences on seven of the Demands of Illness subscales, Social Support, Family Coping-Coherence, Family Hardiness and Family Well-Being. Results of the caregiver analysis indicated significant differences by ethnic group on all variables except Problems with the Providers (Subscale 8 of the Demands of Illness). Student Newman-Keuls post hoc comparisons were examined. In the patient group, the Anglo-Americans demonstrated more Social Support and less impact by the Demands of the Medical Treatment than the Koreans and Mexican-Americans. The Koreans consistently scored lower on Family Coping-Coherence, Family Hardiness, Family Well-Being and higher on most of the Demands of Illness subscales. For the caregiver groups, the Koreans were generally less resilient than the US groups, but were more similar to the Mexican-Americans on Family Well-Being, Personal Meaning of the Illness, and impact of the disease on income, time and energy. Conclusions: Cultural interpretations are offered to explain these differences. Implications: Qualitative research is currently underway to provide greater understanding of these cultural variations. Understanding the experience of families in this situation may provide a prototype for the experience within a broader context of chronic illness management.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:19Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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