The Effects of Journaling on the Critical Thinking Skills of Second Year Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152875
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Journaling on the Critical Thinking Skills of Second Year Nursing Students
Abstract:
The Effects of Journaling on the Critical Thinking Skills of Second Year Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Zurmehly, Joyce, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Ohio University - Chillicothe
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of journaling on the critical thinking skills of second year nursing students. Design: This study was conducted utilizing a quasi-experimental approach. The untreated control group design with a pretest and posttest was utilized. This design is appropriate when examining cause-and-effect relationships between independent and dependent variables. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The sample group for this study was senior level students enrolled in an Associate Degree nursing program from a branch of a major Midwest university. A nonprobability convenience sample was utilized in this study. All senior level students in the associate degree-nursing program were approached and invited to participate. The planed sample consisted of 40 second quarter senior nursing students enrolled in pediatrics and obstetric courses. The utilization of senior nursing students allowed for more homogeneity. Students were tested upon entrance into and as seniors in their last quarter of the nursing program. Concept, Intervention: The concept investigated in this study was critical thinking. The importance of critical thinking in nursing has escalated in response to the changing health care environment. Consequently schools of nursing are responsible to produce a student who can meet these demands. As health care becomes more complex and the issue of critical thinking in nursing and nursing education has become essential to cultivate the ability to solve problems encountered in patient care. Curricula should include learning experiences that help to develop intellectual skills involved in critical thinking such as creativity, intuition, inductive and deductive reasoning and the ability to analyze. Therefore, it is important that strategies such as journaling are developed and evaluated to enhance students' critical thinking skills. Clinical journaling refers to the process of writing to develop personal cognitive abilities. In this study journaling as enhanced by mind mapping was the instrument that was utilized by the nursing students following each clinical day. Methods: The research instrument used to assess critical thinking was the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST), which was developed after the Delphi research report that listed 19 phases that conceptualized the ideal critical thinker. Participants were orientated to the clinical journal and given guidelines to follow. The clinical journal focused on reporting of critical thinking strategies, evaluation of critical thinking processes used, and projection of ways to improve critical thinking. The emphasis was on the connection between content and critical thinking. Findings: Sample scores on the pretest ranged from 7 to 24 with a mean of 15.25. Scores on the post-test ranged from 5 to 22 with a mean of 14.85. No significant differences were found. The research hypothesis proposed that there would be a significant difference in the scores on the CCTST between groups after the intervention of journaling was implemented. After statistical analysis no significant differences were found between the groups. Group A and B students were also compared on each subscale of the CCTST, no significance differences were found on any of these subscales. Conclusion: In conclusion, preparation of a nurse with critical thinking skills requires a collaborative effort of the nursing educator and nursing student. This type of study enables the researcher to have a better understanding of the phenomenon and may suggest methods such as clinical journaling and mind mapping for the enhancement of critical thinking skills. Implications: Currently, the movement from narrow educational views to the acceptance of multiple theoretical perspectives is emerging in many schools of nursing. Improvement of the curriculum is a central theme throughout much of the literature and is implied on most evaluation reports. This curriculum redesign requires a shift in education strategies if nursing is to provide competent primary health care practitioners. The findings of this study suggest the need for further analysis of the methodologies used to foster critical thinking in the clinical experience of nursing students. It is an advantage for nursing students to have clinical experiences that they can reflect upon and discuss with other students and the instructor. Through written assignments, students can begin to document outcomes related to critical thinking.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Journaling on the Critical Thinking Skills of Second Year Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152875-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Journaling on the Critical Thinking Skills of Second Year Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zurmehly, Joyce, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ohio University - Chillicothe</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">zurmehly@ohiou.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of journaling on the critical thinking skills of second year nursing students. Design: This study was conducted utilizing a quasi-experimental approach. The untreated control group design with a pretest and posttest was utilized. This design is appropriate when examining cause-and-effect relationships between independent and dependent variables. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The sample group for this study was senior level students enrolled in an Associate Degree nursing program from a branch of a major Midwest university. A nonprobability convenience sample was utilized in this study. All senior level students in the associate degree-nursing program were approached and invited to participate. The planed sample consisted of 40 second quarter senior nursing students enrolled in pediatrics and obstetric courses. The utilization of senior nursing students allowed for more homogeneity. Students were tested upon entrance into and as seniors in their last quarter of the nursing program. Concept, Intervention: The concept investigated in this study was critical thinking. The importance of critical thinking in nursing has escalated in response to the changing health care environment. Consequently schools of nursing are responsible to produce a student who can meet these demands. As health care becomes more complex and the issue of critical thinking in nursing and nursing education has become essential to cultivate the ability to solve problems encountered in patient care. Curricula should include learning experiences that help to develop intellectual skills involved in critical thinking such as creativity, intuition, inductive and deductive reasoning and the ability to analyze. Therefore, it is important that strategies such as journaling are developed and evaluated to enhance students' critical thinking skills. Clinical journaling refers to the process of writing to develop personal cognitive abilities. In this study journaling as enhanced by mind mapping was the instrument that was utilized by the nursing students following each clinical day. Methods: The research instrument used to assess critical thinking was the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST), which was developed after the Delphi research report that listed 19 phases that conceptualized the ideal critical thinker. Participants were orientated to the clinical journal and given guidelines to follow. The clinical journal focused on reporting of critical thinking strategies, evaluation of critical thinking processes used, and projection of ways to improve critical thinking. The emphasis was on the connection between content and critical thinking. Findings: Sample scores on the pretest ranged from 7 to 24 with a mean of 15.25. Scores on the post-test ranged from 5 to 22 with a mean of 14.85. No significant differences were found. The research hypothesis proposed that there would be a significant difference in the scores on the CCTST between groups after the intervention of journaling was implemented. After statistical analysis no significant differences were found between the groups. Group A and B students were also compared on each subscale of the CCTST, no significance differences were found on any of these subscales. Conclusion: In conclusion, preparation of a nurse with critical thinking skills requires a collaborative effort of the nursing educator and nursing student. This type of study enables the researcher to have a better understanding of the phenomenon and may suggest methods such as clinical journaling and mind mapping for the enhancement of critical thinking skills. Implications: Currently, the movement from narrow educational views to the acceptance of multiple theoretical perspectives is emerging in many schools of nursing. Improvement of the curriculum is a central theme throughout much of the literature and is implied on most evaluation reports. This curriculum redesign requires a shift in education strategies if nursing is to provide competent primary health care practitioners. The findings of this study suggest the need for further analysis of the methodologies used to foster critical thinking in the clinical experience of nursing students. It is an advantage for nursing students to have clinical experiences that they can reflect upon and discuss with other students and the instructor. Through written assignments, students can begin to document outcomes related to critical thinking.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:21Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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