2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152876
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Spiritual Dimension Inventory: Development and Testing
Abstract:
The Spiritual Dimension Inventory: Development and Testing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Rieck, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Arizona University
Title:Assistant Professor
OBJECTIVE The Spiritual Dimension Inventory (SDI) is a questionnaire that measures the patient's perception of the Spiritual Dimension of the Nurse-Patient Relationship (SDNPR). The SDNPR evolved from the experiences of practicing nurses in which they felt connected with patients in a vital and significant way. They believed, and were often told by their patients, that the nurse-patient relationship made a difference in their lives. Measuring the SDNPR may contribute to the understanding of the nurse-patient relationship and its influence on important patient outcomes. CONCEPT The SDNPR is a synthesis of the theories of spirituality (Reed, 1992) and the nurse-patient relationship (Peplau, 1991). The SDNPR has five components: connection, understanding, acceptance, commitment, and trust. Connection is the patient's perception of an emotional and spiritual bond with the nurse. Understanding is being known as a whole person, not merely as a physical body. Acceptance is unconditional positive regard. The patient senses being valued as a person. Commitment is the nurse's vow to honor a calling, whether from one's conscience, humanity, or God. Trust is the patient's ability to rely on the integrity of the nurse to perform as expected, beginning when the patient relies on the nurse to meet basic needs and developing into an interpersonal psychosocial trust. DESIGN The research design was a correlational, predictive, model-testing design. METHODS The SDI is a 25 item self-report questionnaire. Items were derived from the research literature that explored patient perceptions of essential characteristics of the nurse-patient relationship. The SDI responses are on a five-point Likert-type scale. The SDI originally had five subscales, corresponding to the five dimensions of the SDNPR (connection, understanding, acceptance, commitment, and trust). The SDI was examined for reliability and validity. Reliability was assessed by calculating Cronbach alpha reliability coefficients for the subscales and the total scale. Construct validity was tested by confirmatory factor analysis. Predictive validity was evaluated by regressing the SDI on Self-Confidence During Stress, a subscale of the Inventory of Positive Psychological Attitudes, a measure of well-being. POPULATION, SAMPLE, SETTING, YEARS Ninety-eight adult hospitalized, post-operative patients completed the SDI during the Winter and Spring of 2000. The study participants were recruited from two major medical centers in a large city in the Southwest. The study complied with all requirements of the institution's review board to protect of the rights of the research subjects. FINDINGS Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficients were as follows: connection .87, understanding .70, acceptance .90, commitment .84, trust .90, and total scale .96. Since the subscales understanding and acceptance are theoretically congruent they were combined into one subscale, empathy. The alpha coefficient for the empathy subscale was .88. Construct validity was tested by confirmatory factor analysis. Model fit of the measurement models with data from the study sample was done by chi square estimation and fit index calculation. The prevailing model had a chi square of .213, p < .05 and a Bentler-Bennet Fit Index of .996. Predictive validity was examined by regressing the SDI subscales on Self-Confidence During Stress (SCDS). The SDI subscales connection, commitment, and trust accounted for 53% of the variance of SCDS (connection $=.30, commitment $=-.53, trust $=.40, p < .05). The findings support the reliability and validity of the SDI. IMPLICATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS The findings support the use of the Spiritual Dimension Inventory to measure the Spiritual Dimension of the Nurse-Patient Relationship and its use in predicting outcomes such as well-being. The findings have implications for practice, education, and policy development as the nurse-patient relationship accounted for 53% of the variance in patient well-being (SCDS). Implications for research are to repeat the study with larger, more diverse samples, allowing generalization to broader populations.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Spiritual Dimension Inventory: Development and Testingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152876-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Spiritual Dimension Inventory: Development and Testing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rieck, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Arizona University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Susan.Rieck@nau.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE The Spiritual Dimension Inventory (SDI) is a questionnaire that measures the patient's perception of the Spiritual Dimension of the Nurse-Patient Relationship (SDNPR). The SDNPR evolved from the experiences of practicing nurses in which they felt connected with patients in a vital and significant way. They believed, and were often told by their patients, that the nurse-patient relationship made a difference in their lives. Measuring the SDNPR may contribute to the understanding of the nurse-patient relationship and its influence on important patient outcomes. CONCEPT The SDNPR is a synthesis of the theories of spirituality (Reed, 1992) and the nurse-patient relationship (Peplau, 1991). The SDNPR has five components: connection, understanding, acceptance, commitment, and trust. Connection is the patient's perception of an emotional and spiritual bond with the nurse. Understanding is being known as a whole person, not merely as a physical body. Acceptance is unconditional positive regard. The patient senses being valued as a person. Commitment is the nurse's vow to honor a calling, whether from one's conscience, humanity, or God. Trust is the patient's ability to rely on the integrity of the nurse to perform as expected, beginning when the patient relies on the nurse to meet basic needs and developing into an interpersonal psychosocial trust. DESIGN The research design was a correlational, predictive, model-testing design. METHODS The SDI is a 25 item self-report questionnaire. Items were derived from the research literature that explored patient perceptions of essential characteristics of the nurse-patient relationship. The SDI responses are on a five-point Likert-type scale. The SDI originally had five subscales, corresponding to the five dimensions of the SDNPR (connection, understanding, acceptance, commitment, and trust). The SDI was examined for reliability and validity. Reliability was assessed by calculating Cronbach alpha reliability coefficients for the subscales and the total scale. Construct validity was tested by confirmatory factor analysis. Predictive validity was evaluated by regressing the SDI on Self-Confidence During Stress, a subscale of the Inventory of Positive Psychological Attitudes, a measure of well-being. POPULATION, SAMPLE, SETTING, YEARS Ninety-eight adult hospitalized, post-operative patients completed the SDI during the Winter and Spring of 2000. The study participants were recruited from two major medical centers in a large city in the Southwest. The study complied with all requirements of the institution's review board to protect of the rights of the research subjects. FINDINGS Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficients were as follows: connection .87, understanding .70, acceptance .90, commitment .84, trust .90, and total scale .96. Since the subscales understanding and acceptance are theoretically congruent they were combined into one subscale, empathy. The alpha coefficient for the empathy subscale was .88. Construct validity was tested by confirmatory factor analysis. Model fit of the measurement models with data from the study sample was done by chi square estimation and fit index calculation. The prevailing model had a chi square of .213, p &lt; .05 and a Bentler-Bennet Fit Index of .996. Predictive validity was examined by regressing the SDI subscales on Self-Confidence During Stress (SCDS). The SDI subscales connection, commitment, and trust accounted for 53% of the variance of SCDS (connection $=.30, commitment $=-.53, trust $=.40, p &lt; .05). The findings support the reliability and validity of the SDI. IMPLICATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS The findings support the use of the Spiritual Dimension Inventory to measure the Spiritual Dimension of the Nurse-Patient Relationship and its use in predicting outcomes such as well-being. The findings have implications for practice, education, and policy development as the nurse-patient relationship accounted for 53% of the variance in patient well-being (SCDS). Implications for research are to repeat the study with larger, more diverse samples, allowing generalization to broader populations.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:23Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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