2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152877
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship between Teasing and Bullying and Suicide or Homicide
Abstract:
The Relationship between Teasing and Bullying and Suicide or Homicide
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Vessey, Judith, PhD, MBA, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Boston College
Title:Lelia Holden Carroll Endowed Professor of Nursing
Objective: The primary purpose of this study was to demonstrate that teasing and/or bullying may be direct antecedents to suicide or homicide in school-age youth. A secondary objective is to evaluate the feasibility of a new methodology through on-line database searching. Design: A retrospective descriptive study using on-line database information. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The 200 publications (national and international newspapers, news wire services, and transcripts of non-print media) indexed by Lexis-Nexis' Academic Universe were reviewed for a ten year period (1990-2000) using the key words: TEASING, BULLYING, or DISSING and HOMICIDE, SUICIDE, or ASSAULT with the secondary level key word: SCHOOL for relevant articles. Study inclusion criteria required the incident be a factual news report, the perpetrator of the violent act (the teasee) be 5-19 years of age, and that the teasing victim committed suicide or killed the instigator(s). Concepts studied: Teasing and/or bullying, and negative psychological sequelae (e.g., suicide and homicide). Methods: The appropriateness of all identified citations was evaluated. Reports of the same incident were compiled, tracked, and cross-referenced. Additional database searching for each identified incident was conducted to ensure that the most complete information available was retrieved. Each incident was coded for nationality, demographic data about the victims and perpetrators, types of teasing/bullying incidents, and type and method of violence. Published text for each case was entered verbatim into N-VIVO version 5 software for systematic analysis. The analytic process was guided by the research purpose (e.g., antecedent behaviors). Other themes that emerged from the data that further elaborated aspects of the students' experiences were coded. Interpretation of the data was done by the investigators; areas of disagreement were discussed and resolved through further transcript review. Findings: This study identified 54 incidents that were appropriate for further analysis. The majority of the subjects came form the British Isles (n=25) and Japan (n=21). Other countries included the USA (n=4), Canada (n=1), Korea (n=1), New Zealand (n=1), and the Philippines (n=1). Subjects' age ranged from 12-19, those between 12-16 were at highest risk (mode=13 years). Sixty-five percent were male. Subjects tended to have unique physical appearance characteristics or behavioral attributes. The type and method of violence varied by nationality/culture. The preponderance of subjects successfully committed suicide over their despair of being teased/bullied. Major themes identified through qualitative analysis are: 1) no escaping, 2) clueless, 3) not in our school, and 4) blame the victim. Conclusions: Nasty teasing, particularly when persistent and deteriorating into bullying, can escalate into violent suicidal/homicidal behavior. Students who were 'outliers' (e.g., too smart, disabled, fat, "wrong" religion, etc.) were targeted. Family structure appeared to have little impact on a student's vulnerability. Parents and school authorities have limited awareness of recipients who are experiencing teasing/bullying, the degree to which these behaviors are occurring, or the effect(s) that such behaviors have on youth. Culture is an important variable in the type of violence students engage in. Implications: Because teasing/bullying and severe psychological sequelae including suicide and homicide occur throughout the international community, a more thorough understanding of these relationships is needed. Nurses worldwide have an obligation to intervene and break this cycle of violence whenever possible. This methodology shows promise for exploring links between youth violence and teasing/bullying that cannot be readily achieved through standard reporting measures. Further prospective study using more comprehensive reporting services would help amplify these relationships.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship between Teasing and Bullying and Suicide or Homicideen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152877-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship between Teasing and Bullying and Suicide or Homicide</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vessey, Judith, PhD, MBA, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boston College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lelia Holden Carroll Endowed Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vessey@bc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The primary purpose of this study was to demonstrate that teasing and/or bullying may be direct antecedents to suicide or homicide in school-age youth. A secondary objective is to evaluate the feasibility of a new methodology through on-line database searching. Design: A retrospective descriptive study using on-line database information. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The 200 publications (national and international newspapers, news wire services, and transcripts of non-print media) indexed by Lexis-Nexis' Academic Universe were reviewed for a ten year period (1990-2000) using the key words: TEASING, BULLYING, or DISSING and HOMICIDE, SUICIDE, or ASSAULT with the secondary level key word: SCHOOL for relevant articles. Study inclusion criteria required the incident be a factual news report, the perpetrator of the violent act (the teasee) be 5-19 years of age, and that the teasing victim committed suicide or killed the instigator(s). Concepts studied: Teasing and/or bullying, and negative psychological sequelae (e.g., suicide and homicide). Methods: The appropriateness of all identified citations was evaluated. Reports of the same incident were compiled, tracked, and cross-referenced. Additional database searching for each identified incident was conducted to ensure that the most complete information available was retrieved. Each incident was coded for nationality, demographic data about the victims and perpetrators, types of teasing/bullying incidents, and type and method of violence. Published text for each case was entered verbatim into N-VIVO version 5 software for systematic analysis. The analytic process was guided by the research purpose (e.g., antecedent behaviors). Other themes that emerged from the data that further elaborated aspects of the students' experiences were coded. Interpretation of the data was done by the investigators; areas of disagreement were discussed and resolved through further transcript review. Findings: This study identified 54 incidents that were appropriate for further analysis. The majority of the subjects came form the British Isles (n=25) and Japan (n=21). Other countries included the USA (n=4), Canada (n=1), Korea (n=1), New Zealand (n=1), and the Philippines (n=1). Subjects' age ranged from 12-19, those between 12-16 were at highest risk (mode=13 years). Sixty-five percent were male. Subjects tended to have unique physical appearance characteristics or behavioral attributes. The type and method of violence varied by nationality/culture. The preponderance of subjects successfully committed suicide over their despair of being teased/bullied. Major themes identified through qualitative analysis are: 1) no escaping, 2) clueless, 3) not in our school, and 4) blame the victim. Conclusions: Nasty teasing, particularly when persistent and deteriorating into bullying, can escalate into violent suicidal/homicidal behavior. Students who were 'outliers' (e.g., too smart, disabled, fat, &quot;wrong&quot; religion, etc.) were targeted. Family structure appeared to have little impact on a student's vulnerability. Parents and school authorities have limited awareness of recipients who are experiencing teasing/bullying, the degree to which these behaviors are occurring, or the effect(s) that such behaviors have on youth. Culture is an important variable in the type of violence students engage in. Implications: Because teasing/bullying and severe psychological sequelae including suicide and homicide occur throughout the international community, a more thorough understanding of these relationships is needed. Nurses worldwide have an obligation to intervene and break this cycle of violence whenever possible. This methodology shows promise for exploring links between youth violence and teasing/bullying that cannot be readily achieved through standard reporting measures. Further prospective study using more comprehensive reporting services would help amplify these relationships.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:26Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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