Coping Behaviors of Sexually Abused Boys in Relation to Levels of Depression and Hopelessness: The Use of Vulnerable Subjects in Research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152878
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coping Behaviors of Sexually Abused Boys in Relation to Levels of Depression and Hopelessness: The Use of Vulnerable Subjects in Research
Abstract:
Coping Behaviors of Sexually Abused Boys in Relation to Levels of Depression and Hopelessness: The Use of Vulnerable Subjects in Research
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Rick, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:Louisiana State University Health Science Center
Title:Assistant Professor
Objectives: This study explores the coping behaviors of sexually abused latency age boys in relation to levels of depression and hopelessness. Identifying coping behaviors and factors which affect how latency age boys deal with sexual abuse will allow for more sensitive and effective nursing care, thus improving outcomes for this pediatric population. Problems associated with the use of children as research subjects are emphasized to elucidate the special needs of this vulnerable population. Design: A descriptive correlational design was used to determine the coping behaviors of sexually abused boys in relation to levels of depression and hopelessness. The influence of other variables was examined, using a regression model. Population, Sample, Setting Years: Data were collected from a convenience sample of twenty-five boys who had experienced some form of sexual abuse. They were referred from both inpatient and outpatient settings over a 15 month period. Recruitment of subjects was problematic and reasons for this difficulty are identified. Special considerations for this population as research subjects are stressed. Variables Studied: In addition to examining the relationship between the coping behavior of sexually abused boys and levels of depression and hopelessness, the influences of other variables was also evaluated. These variables include age of onset of abuse, type of abuse, duration of abuse, victim's current age, abuser's relationship to abused, abused perpetration and family dysfunction. Methods: This descriptive correlational study examined the relationship between the coping behaviors of sexually abused boys and levels of depression and hopelessness. The influence of possible related variables was also examined, using a regression model. Data were collected as the researcher completed a demographic form and the Coping Inventory (ABI) (Zeitlin, 1985). The participants completed the Hopelessness Scale for Children (HSC) (Kazdin, French, Unis, Esveldt-Dawson & Sherick, 1983) and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) (Kovacs, 1982). Six hypotheses which describe the relationships among the variables were tested using appropriate statistical methods. The sixth hypothesis was tested using multiple regression and correlation analysis. A model was generated. Findings: A test profile emerged; the mean Adaptive Behavior Index was 2.91; the mean CDI Score was 15.16, with a mean HSC of 5.24. Non significance was demonstrated in all but the sixth hypothesis. Controlling for the effects of the exogenous variables of age of onset of abuse and duration, the variables coping and depression were found to be significant in predicting hopelessness. Conclusions: Although the need for research in this area is well documented and in spite of assurances that confidentiality would be maintained and no discussion of the abuse would occur, recruitment of subjects from this population was difficult. However, a participant profile emerged, which was congruent with that documented in past research. Mean age was 9.64 years. Mean age of onset was 5.05 years and mean duration of abuse was 1.92 years. Most victims came from homes missing one or more biological parents with a history of conflict. Most had suffered primary parental abuse, as 80% were abused by someone directly related to them. Older boys had a longer of history of abuse and less adaptive behavioral responses. Implications: Nursing research for this population of children requires special consideration in the area of IRB process, recruitment and consent. Realizing this and that little research has been done on this population of sexually abused boys, nursing needs to continue to explore this complex societal problem. We need to promote thorough assessments and interventions for "at risk children." Additionally, recognizing that depression is a sequella of childhood sexual abuse, we need to focus on positive coping techniques. Provision of a safe milieu is essential. In the outpatient setting, the nurse must continue to evaluate the child's progress, in light of an identified treatment plan. This may include assessment and education regarding specific interventions, as well as evaluation of any prescribed pharmacologic treatments. In these roles, nursing offers a unique and essential perspective in the coordination, implementation and evaluation of treatment issues related to this particular population of children.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoping Behaviors of Sexually Abused Boys in Relation to Levels of Depression and Hopelessness: The Use of Vulnerable Subjects in Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152878-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Coping Behaviors of Sexually Abused Boys in Relation to Levels of Depression and Hopelessness: The Use of Vulnerable Subjects in Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rick, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Louisiana State University Health Science Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">srick@lsuhsc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: This study explores the coping behaviors of sexually abused latency age boys in relation to levels of depression and hopelessness. Identifying coping behaviors and factors which affect how latency age boys deal with sexual abuse will allow for more sensitive and effective nursing care, thus improving outcomes for this pediatric population. Problems associated with the use of children as research subjects are emphasized to elucidate the special needs of this vulnerable population. Design: A descriptive correlational design was used to determine the coping behaviors of sexually abused boys in relation to levels of depression and hopelessness. The influence of other variables was examined, using a regression model. Population, Sample, Setting Years: Data were collected from a convenience sample of twenty-five boys who had experienced some form of sexual abuse. They were referred from both inpatient and outpatient settings over a 15 month period. Recruitment of subjects was problematic and reasons for this difficulty are identified. Special considerations for this population as research subjects are stressed. Variables Studied: In addition to examining the relationship between the coping behavior of sexually abused boys and levels of depression and hopelessness, the influences of other variables was also evaluated. These variables include age of onset of abuse, type of abuse, duration of abuse, victim's current age, abuser's relationship to abused, abused perpetration and family dysfunction. Methods: This descriptive correlational study examined the relationship between the coping behaviors of sexually abused boys and levels of depression and hopelessness. The influence of possible related variables was also examined, using a regression model. Data were collected as the researcher completed a demographic form and the Coping Inventory (ABI) (Zeitlin, 1985). The participants completed the Hopelessness Scale for Children (HSC) (Kazdin, French, Unis, Esveldt-Dawson &amp; Sherick, 1983) and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) (Kovacs, 1982). Six hypotheses which describe the relationships among the variables were tested using appropriate statistical methods. The sixth hypothesis was tested using multiple regression and correlation analysis. A model was generated. Findings: A test profile emerged; the mean Adaptive Behavior Index was 2.91; the mean CDI Score was 15.16, with a mean HSC of 5.24. Non significance was demonstrated in all but the sixth hypothesis. Controlling for the effects of the exogenous variables of age of onset of abuse and duration, the variables coping and depression were found to be significant in predicting hopelessness. Conclusions: Although the need for research in this area is well documented and in spite of assurances that confidentiality would be maintained and no discussion of the abuse would occur, recruitment of subjects from this population was difficult. However, a participant profile emerged, which was congruent with that documented in past research. Mean age was 9.64 years. Mean age of onset was 5.05 years and mean duration of abuse was 1.92 years. Most victims came from homes missing one or more biological parents with a history of conflict. Most had suffered primary parental abuse, as 80% were abused by someone directly related to them. Older boys had a longer of history of abuse and less adaptive behavioral responses. Implications: Nursing research for this population of children requires special consideration in the area of IRB process, recruitment and consent. Realizing this and that little research has been done on this population of sexually abused boys, nursing needs to continue to explore this complex societal problem. We need to promote thorough assessments and interventions for &quot;at risk children.&quot; Additionally, recognizing that depression is a sequella of childhood sexual abuse, we need to focus on positive coping techniques. Provision of a safe milieu is essential. In the outpatient setting, the nurse must continue to evaluate the child's progress, in light of an identified treatment plan. This may include assessment and education regarding specific interventions, as well as evaluation of any prescribed pharmacologic treatments. In these roles, nursing offers a unique and essential perspective in the coordination, implementation and evaluation of treatment issues related to this particular population of children.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:28Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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