Appalachian Women's Knowledge and Practice of Breast Health Self Care Behaviors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152880
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Appalachian Women's Knowledge and Practice of Breast Health Self Care Behaviors
Abstract:
Appalachian Women's Knowledge and Practice of Breast Health Self Care Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Leslie, Nan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:West Virginia University
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: To determine women's breast cancer knowledge and fears, personal screening practices, and perceived breast care proficiency prior to initiating an intervention aimed at enhancing breast health self care activities and increasing adherence to overall breast cancer screening guidelines. Design: Phase I of a 3 year randomized longitudinal intervention study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research, which was aimed at enhancing breast health self care activities and increasing adherence to overall breast cancer screening guidelines. Phase I gathered data about breast cancer knowledge and the factors that promote or inhibit breast health self care, through face-to-face interview and questionnaire completion. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 185 Appalachian women with no personal history of breast cancer, who had been recruited over a 17 month period from a primarily rural, southern American state. Variables : Independent variables : Demographic variables (age, education, ethnicity, marital status), Relationship to another woman with breast cancer (first degree relatives, non-first degree relatives, friends, acquaintances). Dependent variables: Frequency of breast self-examination (BSE); knowledge, proficiency and motivation to practice breast cancer screening; breast cancer fatalism. Methods: The Toronto Breast Self Examination Inventory-M (Modified) and Perceived Proficiency Inventory were administered to all women prior to randomization to control or intervention groups. These instruments assessed breast cancer fatalism, perceived practice proficiency, practice motivation, and knowledge of breast health care; and frequency of BSE, mammography, and clinical breast examination. Findings: The participants tended to be Caucasian (92%) middle aged (average age 46 years), married (72%), and relatively well educated (65%- some college, or a college or post graduate degree). Few women had accurate knowledge about breast cancer, associated risk factors, or appropriate screening activities. A small number reported performing the full scope of screening activities. Women who had been educated by health care providers had greater knowledge about breast cancer and screening guidelines than did women who received information in any other way. Education influenced knowledge about breast cancer and screening activities while marital status influenced motivational factors to practice BSE. Age did not impact behavior in this group of women. Overall, fatalism was low but minorities tended to express greater breast cancer fatalism than did Caucasians. All women denied that: they were adverse to touching their breasts, BSE made them worry about breast cancer, their chances were less than other women for contracting breast cancer, or that they could abdicate BSE because they had an annual clinical examination. They attributed lack of BSE in others to discomfort with touching their breasts, worry about breast cancer, and lack of confidence and ability to detect breast changes. Conclusions: Despite widespread efforts to increase women's understanding and awareness about breast cancer risk factors, detection and treatment, health care providers are challenged to encourage women to take charge of their breast health care. These findings offer a knowledge base on which potential behavior changing interventions can be built. Implications: Educating women about breast cancer risk factors, screening guidelines and necessity for early detection and treatment must continue to be a high priority in health care agendas. Health care providers, especially nurses, must create opportunities to educate women patients and the public in general. This research indicates that interpersonal teaching/learning between health care providers and patients/clients is the most effective way to educate women about breast cancer and early detection practices.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAppalachian Women's Knowledge and Practice of Breast Health Self Care Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152880-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Appalachian Women's Knowledge and Practice of Breast Health Self Care Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Leslie, Nan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">West Virginia University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nleslie@hsc.wvu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To determine women's breast cancer knowledge and fears, personal screening practices, and perceived breast care proficiency prior to initiating an intervention aimed at enhancing breast health self care activities and increasing adherence to overall breast cancer screening guidelines. Design: Phase I of a 3 year randomized longitudinal intervention study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research, which was aimed at enhancing breast health self care activities and increasing adherence to overall breast cancer screening guidelines. Phase I gathered data about breast cancer knowledge and the factors that promote or inhibit breast health self care, through face-to-face interview and questionnaire completion. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 185 Appalachian women with no personal history of breast cancer, who had been recruited over a 17 month period from a primarily rural, southern American state. Variables : Independent variables : Demographic variables (age, education, ethnicity, marital status), Relationship to another woman with breast cancer (first degree relatives, non-first degree relatives, friends, acquaintances). Dependent variables: Frequency of breast self-examination (BSE); knowledge, proficiency and motivation to practice breast cancer screening; breast cancer fatalism. Methods: The Toronto Breast Self Examination Inventory-M (Modified) and Perceived Proficiency Inventory were administered to all women prior to randomization to control or intervention groups. These instruments assessed breast cancer fatalism, perceived practice proficiency, practice motivation, and knowledge of breast health care; and frequency of BSE, mammography, and clinical breast examination. Findings: The participants tended to be Caucasian (92%) middle aged (average age 46 years), married (72%), and relatively well educated (65%- some college, or a college or post graduate degree). Few women had accurate knowledge about breast cancer, associated risk factors, or appropriate screening activities. A small number reported performing the full scope of screening activities. Women who had been educated by health care providers had greater knowledge about breast cancer and screening guidelines than did women who received information in any other way. Education influenced knowledge about breast cancer and screening activities while marital status influenced motivational factors to practice BSE. Age did not impact behavior in this group of women. Overall, fatalism was low but minorities tended to express greater breast cancer fatalism than did Caucasians. All women denied that: they were adverse to touching their breasts, BSE made them worry about breast cancer, their chances were less than other women for contracting breast cancer, or that they could abdicate BSE because they had an annual clinical examination. They attributed lack of BSE in others to discomfort with touching their breasts, worry about breast cancer, and lack of confidence and ability to detect breast changes. Conclusions: Despite widespread efforts to increase women's understanding and awareness about breast cancer risk factors, detection and treatment, health care providers are challenged to encourage women to take charge of their breast health care. These findings offer a knowledge base on which potential behavior changing interventions can be built. Implications: Educating women about breast cancer risk factors, screening guidelines and necessity for early detection and treatment must continue to be a high priority in health care agendas. Health care providers, especially nurses, must create opportunities to educate women patients and the public in general. This research indicates that interpersonal teaching/learning between health care providers and patients/clients is the most effective way to educate women about breast cancer and early detection practices.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:33Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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