2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152881
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Achieving Student and Health Outcomes through Service-Learning
Abstract:
Achieving Student and Health Outcomes through Service-Learning
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Reising, Deanna, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: This presentation will describe a service-learning initiative for sophomore baccalaureate nursing students. The purpose of this service-learning program is twofold: 1) to provide the opportunity for sophomore level students to improve upon their blood pressure monitoring and counseling skills; and 2) to provide the university community with easy access to blood pressure screening and counseling services. Measured outcomes program address both purposes of the service-learning program. The Health and Wellness Education Center of the campus Health Center is the community partner for the screenings and provides services to students as a part of a student health fee, as well university employees for a small fee. Research Questions: 1. What are students' perceptions of their blood pressure monitoring skills as a result of participating in the service-learning program? 2. What course and program competencies do students believe they have achieved as a result of participating in the service-learning program? 3. What are students' perceptions of their civic responsibility as nurses as a result of participating in the service-learning program? 4. What are the faculty members' perceptions of the benefits and drawbacks while supervising students in the service-learning program? 5. What is the incidence of new hypertension cases as detected by the service-learning program? 6. How many health referrals have been made, by referral type, as a result of the service-learning program? Participants: Human subjects approval was obtained to evaluate both the student and community components of the program. Student participants include 53 sophomore level students in their first nursing courses. The course under which the service-learning program is housed is Developmental Issues in Health. Client participants include over 300 faculty, staff, students, and visitors to the campus. While the program targeted faculty and staff, no one was denied access to the service. Data were collected over a four month period in the Fall, 2001 semester. Design and Methods: The study design is descriptive. Data for questions 1, 2 and 3 were collected through reflective journals, online reflective discussion forums, and through anonymous course evaluations. Data for question 4 were collected through faculty reflective sessions. Data for questions 5 and 6 were collected through information collected during the screening process and entered into a database. Findings: Data analysis will be completed in December, 2001. Over 50 new cases of high blood pressure were detected. Findings from each research question will be presented along with overall general impressions of the program and its link to another service-learning program. Implications: Literature about service-learning in nursing has typically only addressed only student outcomes OR community outcomes. Further, studies often neglect the civic component of service-learning that is key in professional development. This service-learning program addressed student outcomes, civic outcomes, and community outcomes so nurse educators may determine under which circumstances service-learning is a viable educational strategy. Because nursing is a service profession, and the image of nursing is often embedded within the hospital setting, service-learning provides a unique opportunity to showcase the wellness education skills that make nursing a valuable and independent profession.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAchieving Student and Health Outcomes through Service-Learningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152881-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Achieving Student and Health Outcomes through Service-Learning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reising, Deanna, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dreising@indiana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This presentation will describe a service-learning initiative for sophomore baccalaureate nursing students. The purpose of this service-learning program is twofold: 1) to provide the opportunity for sophomore level students to improve upon their blood pressure monitoring and counseling skills; and 2) to provide the university community with easy access to blood pressure screening and counseling services. Measured outcomes program address both purposes of the service-learning program. The Health and Wellness Education Center of the campus Health Center is the community partner for the screenings and provides services to students as a part of a student health fee, as well university employees for a small fee. Research Questions: 1. What are students' perceptions of their blood pressure monitoring skills as a result of participating in the service-learning program? 2. What course and program competencies do students believe they have achieved as a result of participating in the service-learning program? 3. What are students' perceptions of their civic responsibility as nurses as a result of participating in the service-learning program? 4. What are the faculty members' perceptions of the benefits and drawbacks while supervising students in the service-learning program? 5. What is the incidence of new hypertension cases as detected by the service-learning program? 6. How many health referrals have been made, by referral type, as a result of the service-learning program? Participants: Human subjects approval was obtained to evaluate both the student and community components of the program. Student participants include 53 sophomore level students in their first nursing courses. The course under which the service-learning program is housed is Developmental Issues in Health. Client participants include over 300 faculty, staff, students, and visitors to the campus. While the program targeted faculty and staff, no one was denied access to the service. Data were collected over a four month period in the Fall, 2001 semester. Design and Methods: The study design is descriptive. Data for questions 1, 2 and 3 were collected through reflective journals, online reflective discussion forums, and through anonymous course evaluations. Data for question 4 were collected through faculty reflective sessions. Data for questions 5 and 6 were collected through information collected during the screening process and entered into a database. Findings: Data analysis will be completed in December, 2001. Over 50 new cases of high blood pressure were detected. Findings from each research question will be presented along with overall general impressions of the program and its link to another service-learning program. Implications: Literature about service-learning in nursing has typically only addressed only student outcomes OR community outcomes. Further, studies often neglect the civic component of service-learning that is key in professional development. This service-learning program addressed student outcomes, civic outcomes, and community outcomes so nurse educators may determine under which circumstances service-learning is a viable educational strategy. Because nursing is a service profession, and the image of nursing is often embedded within the hospital setting, service-learning provides a unique opportunity to showcase the wellness education skills that make nursing a valuable and independent profession.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:35Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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