2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152883
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment and Retention of Nurses: A Challenge for Nurse Managers
Abstract:
Recruitment and Retention of Nurses: A Challenge for Nurse Managers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Cameron, Sheila
P.I. Institution Name:University of Windsor
Title:Dean and Professor
Objective: The objective of this research was to examine the experiences of hospital and community nurses in practice settings in this time of growing nursing shortage. This shortage is an issue faced by many employers involved in recruiting and retaining nurses around the world. It is only by understanding the experiences of nurses in their current work-place that nurse managers will be successful in their future recruitment and retention initiatives and provide a practice environment that supports nurses and attracts and retains them in their positions. Design: This descriptive correlational study was conducted using a random sample of nurses working in hospital and community settings. Nurses names were obtained from a provincial nursing registry in Ontario, Canada, and the nurses were recruited through a mailed questionnaire. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: All registered nurses practising in the province of Ontario are required to be registered by the College of Nurses and we requested from them 3000 nurse names representing 1500 hospital and 1500 community nurses who were current registrants working in Ontario. Further, we requested that 750 in each group be employed full-time and 750 part-time. This study was conducted in Fall and Winter 2000 and 2001, Variables studied: A range of scales with established reliability and validity were selected to measure the experiences of nurses in their work-setting. Measures of organizational factors included measures of Organizational Support, Decentralized Decision-making and Nurse-Physician Relationships. Personal supports, included Immediate Supervisor Support and Work-group Cohesiveness and Job Related factors include Autonomy/Control, Job Challenge, Work Demands, Fair Treatment, Work-Status Congruence, Satisfaction with Career, Salary and Working Conditions were also measured. Method: This quantitative study used a mailed questionnaire to survey a random sample of nurses, working full and part-time in hospital and community settings. Variables measured were selected to examine how Organizational, Personal, and Job-related factors were impacting on the nurses in their place of work. In addition, we explored how satisfied the nurses were with their Career, Salary and Working Conditions. Findings: Respondents included 1248 nurses, 54% Community Nurses (56% full-time) and 46% Hospital Nurses (60% Full-time). Overall, hospital nurses reported lower score on all scales except Satisfaction with Salary where community nurses scores were lowest. Both groups of nurses, however, did report lower than average scores on the measures of Organizational Support, Participation in Decision-making, Immediate Supervisor Support, Fair Treatment, and Salary. In addition hospital nurses reported lower scores on satisfaction with Work Demands, Work Schedules, and Working Conditions. Average to above average scores were reported by hospital and community nurses on Work-group Cohesiveness, Autonomy/control, Job Challenge and Career Satisfaction. Place of work, hospital or community, explained more differences between groups than did Full or Part-time work status. Conclusions: If nurse managers are to be able to successfully recruit and retain their nursing employees it will be essential that they attend to the concerns expressed by nurses and work towards creating working practice settings that will be attractive to new recruits and retain them in their employ. Implications: Nursing employers need to be sensitive to the research and literature as well as the voices of nurses, in both hospital and community practice settings, if they are to develop successful strategies for recruitment and retention of their staff. During shortages many alternative options often become available to nurses and it is essential that employers fully understand the needs and desires of their employees. Research such as this seeks to systematically examine the experiences of nurses with a view to enabling employers to make places of employment fit the desires of nurses they are working to recruit or retain.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment and Retention of Nurses: A Challenge for Nurse Managersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152883-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Recruitment and Retention of Nurses: A Challenge for Nurse Managers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cameron, Sheila</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Windsor</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean and Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">camero2@uwindsor.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of this research was to examine the experiences of hospital and community nurses in practice settings in this time of growing nursing shortage. This shortage is an issue faced by many employers involved in recruiting and retaining nurses around the world. It is only by understanding the experiences of nurses in their current work-place that nurse managers will be successful in their future recruitment and retention initiatives and provide a practice environment that supports nurses and attracts and retains them in their positions. Design: This descriptive correlational study was conducted using a random sample of nurses working in hospital and community settings. Nurses names were obtained from a provincial nursing registry in Ontario, Canada, and the nurses were recruited through a mailed questionnaire. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: All registered nurses practising in the province of Ontario are required to be registered by the College of Nurses and we requested from them 3000 nurse names representing 1500 hospital and 1500 community nurses who were current registrants working in Ontario. Further, we requested that 750 in each group be employed full-time and 750 part-time. This study was conducted in Fall and Winter 2000 and 2001, Variables studied: A range of scales with established reliability and validity were selected to measure the experiences of nurses in their work-setting. Measures of organizational factors included measures of Organizational Support, Decentralized Decision-making and Nurse-Physician Relationships. Personal supports, included Immediate Supervisor Support and Work-group Cohesiveness and Job Related factors include Autonomy/Control, Job Challenge, Work Demands, Fair Treatment, Work-Status Congruence, Satisfaction with Career, Salary and Working Conditions were also measured. Method: This quantitative study used a mailed questionnaire to survey a random sample of nurses, working full and part-time in hospital and community settings. Variables measured were selected to examine how Organizational, Personal, and Job-related factors were impacting on the nurses in their place of work. In addition, we explored how satisfied the nurses were with their Career, Salary and Working Conditions. Findings: Respondents included 1248 nurses, 54% Community Nurses (56% full-time) and 46% Hospital Nurses (60% Full-time). Overall, hospital nurses reported lower score on all scales except Satisfaction with Salary where community nurses scores were lowest. Both groups of nurses, however, did report lower than average scores on the measures of Organizational Support, Participation in Decision-making, Immediate Supervisor Support, Fair Treatment, and Salary. In addition hospital nurses reported lower scores on satisfaction with Work Demands, Work Schedules, and Working Conditions. Average to above average scores were reported by hospital and community nurses on Work-group Cohesiveness, Autonomy/control, Job Challenge and Career Satisfaction. Place of work, hospital or community, explained more differences between groups than did Full or Part-time work status. Conclusions: If nurse managers are to be able to successfully recruit and retain their nursing employees it will be essential that they attend to the concerns expressed by nurses and work towards creating working practice settings that will be attractive to new recruits and retain them in their employ. Implications: Nursing employers need to be sensitive to the research and literature as well as the voices of nurses, in both hospital and community practice settings, if they are to develop successful strategies for recruitment and retention of their staff. During shortages many alternative options often become available to nurses and it is essential that employers fully understand the needs and desires of their employees. Research such as this seeks to systematically examine the experiences of nurses with a view to enabling employers to make places of employment fit the desires of nurses they are working to recruit or retain.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:40Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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