Hardiness and Coping Among Nurse Managers: Implications for Practice and Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152884
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hardiness and Coping Among Nurse Managers: Implications for Practice and Education
Abstract:
Hardiness and Coping Among Nurse Managers: Implications for Practice and Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Judkins, Sharon
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas-Arlington
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: This study evaluated the association between stress, coping strategies and the degree of hardiness among mid-level nurse managers (MLNMs). Further, specific demographic data were evaluated to determine the extent of associations between hardiness and coping strategies among this sample. Design: This was a descriptive study involving an investigation of the relationships among hardiness, coping strategies, and stress among MLNMs. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A sample of MLNMs was taken from the population of nurses working in a full or part-time middle management position in hospitals from a large metropolitan area in North Texas in the summer of 1999. Concepts or Variables Studied Together: Variables for this study included stress, hardiness, and coping strategies. Methods: A sample of 200 MLNMs were surveyed via a mailed questionnaire consisting of demographic information, Perceived Stress Scale, Hardiness Scale, and Ways of Coping Questionnaire. Of these, 149 (75%) were returned. Four were deleted due to incomplete information for a final N=145 (72%). Findings: As hypothesized, stress was significantly higher among MLNMs whose coping strategies tended to include confrontation, self-controlling, accepting responsibility, and escape-avoidance. High hardiness was associated with lower stress levels and with coping strategies of seeking social support, planful problem solving, and positive reappraisal; low hardiness was associated use of escape-avoidance. Higher stress was also significant among those younger with fewer years in nursing, fewer years in management, and fewer direct reports. Conclusions: Nurse managers confronting high stress tend to use a combination of coping strategies depending on the stressful encounter. However, high hardy nurse managers experience lower stress and are more likely to use adaptive coping strategies than those less hardy. Older nurse managers who have more years in nursing and management are more likely to possess higher levels of workplace commitment. Further, nurse managers feeling a greater sense of control and autonomy need less contact with their supervisors. Younger nurse managers with less experience are more apt to feel higher levels of stress, use escape as a coping strategy, and need more contact with supervisors. Implications: Use of this information can assist both service and education. Nurse administrators may find that information relative to increasing hardiness and enhancing adaptive coping strategies among managers and staff could reduce stress and produce higher levels of commitment, problem-solving, increased performance, job satisfaction, and yield positive impacts on patient outcomes. Further, as part of student preparation for roles in management, teaching hardiness and adaptive coping strategies might prove beneficial by increasing resistance to stress and increasing use of problem-focused coping strategies. Diminishing negative effects of stress has the potential for producing a healthier workforce thus providing benefits to both managers and employers.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHardiness and Coping Among Nurse Managers: Implications for Practice and Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152884-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hardiness and Coping Among Nurse Managers: Implications for Practice and Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Judkins, Sharon</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas-Arlington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">judkins@uta.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study evaluated the association between stress, coping strategies and the degree of hardiness among mid-level nurse managers (MLNMs). Further, specific demographic data were evaluated to determine the extent of associations between hardiness and coping strategies among this sample. Design: This was a descriptive study involving an investigation of the relationships among hardiness, coping strategies, and stress among MLNMs. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A sample of MLNMs was taken from the population of nurses working in a full or part-time middle management position in hospitals from a large metropolitan area in North Texas in the summer of 1999. Concepts or Variables Studied Together: Variables for this study included stress, hardiness, and coping strategies. Methods: A sample of 200 MLNMs were surveyed via a mailed questionnaire consisting of demographic information, Perceived Stress Scale, Hardiness Scale, and Ways of Coping Questionnaire. Of these, 149 (75%) were returned. Four were deleted due to incomplete information for a final N=145 (72%). Findings: As hypothesized, stress was significantly higher among MLNMs whose coping strategies tended to include confrontation, self-controlling, accepting responsibility, and escape-avoidance. High hardiness was associated with lower stress levels and with coping strategies of seeking social support, planful problem solving, and positive reappraisal; low hardiness was associated use of escape-avoidance. Higher stress was also significant among those younger with fewer years in nursing, fewer years in management, and fewer direct reports. Conclusions: Nurse managers confronting high stress tend to use a combination of coping strategies depending on the stressful encounter. However, high hardy nurse managers experience lower stress and are more likely to use adaptive coping strategies than those less hardy. Older nurse managers who have more years in nursing and management are more likely to possess higher levels of workplace commitment. Further, nurse managers feeling a greater sense of control and autonomy need less contact with their supervisors. Younger nurse managers with less experience are more apt to feel higher levels of stress, use escape as a coping strategy, and need more contact with supervisors. Implications: Use of this information can assist both service and education. Nurse administrators may find that information relative to increasing hardiness and enhancing adaptive coping strategies among managers and staff could reduce stress and produce higher levels of commitment, problem-solving, increased performance, job satisfaction, and yield positive impacts on patient outcomes. Further, as part of student preparation for roles in management, teaching hardiness and adaptive coping strategies might prove beneficial by increasing resistance to stress and increasing use of problem-focused coping strategies. Diminishing negative effects of stress has the potential for producing a healthier workforce thus providing benefits to both managers and employers.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:42Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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