Marital and Parenting Satisfaction, and Parenting Self-Efficacy During the First Year Postpartum

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152885
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Marital and Parenting Satisfaction, and Parenting Self-Efficacy During the First Year Postpartum
Abstract:
Marital and Parenting Satisfaction, and Parenting Self-Efficacy During the First Year Postpartum
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Elek, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Associate Professor
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this longitudinal study was to determine the changes in and relationships among first-time mothers' and fathers' reports of marital and parenting satisfaction, and parenting self-efficacy during the first year postpartum. DESIGN: A repeated measures design was used in this study. POPULATION: Thirty-two couples who were first-time parents were recruited from primary care offices in a Midwestern, USA city during the 9th month of the mothers' pregnancy. CONCEPTS: New mothers' and fathers' marital satisfaction, parenting satisfaction, and parenting self-efficacy were the concepts examined in this study. METHOD: Mothers and fathers were asked independently to complete the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS, Spanier, 1976), the What Being the Parent of a New Baby is Like-Revised Scale (WPBL-R, Pridham & Chang, 1989), and the Infant Care Self-Efficacy Scale (ICS, Froman & Owen, 1989) when their infants were 1, 4, and 12 months of age. Repeated measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were done using time and couple as within-subject variables to detect significant changes in these variables over time. Paired t-tests were done to determine differences at each time period between mothers' and fathers' reports of marital and parenting satisfaction, and parenting self-efficacy. Pearson Product Moment Correlations were done to examine relationships among marital and parenting satisfaction, and parenting self-efficacy. FINDINGS: Mothers' and fathers' marital satisfaction did not significantly change between 1 and 4 months, but significantly declined between 4 and 12 months postpartum. Both parents' parenting satisfaction significantly increased between 1 and 4 months, but did not significantly change between 4 and 12 months postpartum. Both parents' reports of parenting self-efficacy significantly increased between 1 and 4 months and again between 4 and 12 months postpartum. At all time periods, mothers reported significantly higher levels of parenting satisfaction and parenting self-efficacy than fathers. But mothers' reports of marital satisfaction did not significantly differ from fathers' at any time. Neither mothers' reports of parenting satisfaction nor their reports of parenting self-efficacy were significantly related to fathers' reports at any time. Mothers' reports of marital satisfaction were highly correlated with fathers' reports at each time period. A significant relationship was found between parenting satisfaction and parenting self-efficacy at 4 and 12 months postpartum for both mothers and fathers. For mothers, but not for fathers, there was a significant correlation between marital and parenting satisfaction at 4 and 12 months postpartum. CONCLUSIONS: New mothers' and new fathers' marital and parenting satisfaction, and their parenting self-efficacy change during the first year postpartum. Mothers' parenting self-efficacy is not related to fathers' parenting self-efficacy, and mothers' parenting satisfaction is not related to fathers' parenting satisfaction during the first year postpartum. Mothers and fathers do not seem to follow the same trajectory of change during the transition to parenthood, and parents' feelings of parenting self-efficacy and satisfaction seem to be independent of each other. This study reinforces the need for longitudinal studies of the transition and adaptation to the role of parenthood, and demonstrates the need to include new fathers in studies of transition.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMarital and Parenting Satisfaction, and Parenting Self-Efficacy During the First Year Postpartumen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152885-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Marital and Parenting Satisfaction, and Parenting Self-Efficacy During the First Year Postpartum</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Elek, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eleksm@ucmail.uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE: The objective of this longitudinal study was to determine the changes in and relationships among first-time mothers' and fathers' reports of marital and parenting satisfaction, and parenting self-efficacy during the first year postpartum. DESIGN: A repeated measures design was used in this study. POPULATION: Thirty-two couples who were first-time parents were recruited from primary care offices in a Midwestern, USA city during the 9th month of the mothers' pregnancy. CONCEPTS: New mothers' and fathers' marital satisfaction, parenting satisfaction, and parenting self-efficacy were the concepts examined in this study. METHOD: Mothers and fathers were asked independently to complete the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS, Spanier, 1976), the What Being the Parent of a New Baby is Like-Revised Scale (WPBL-R, Pridham &amp; Chang, 1989), and the Infant Care Self-Efficacy Scale (ICS, Froman &amp; Owen, 1989) when their infants were 1, 4, and 12 months of age. Repeated measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were done using time and couple as within-subject variables to detect significant changes in these variables over time. Paired t-tests were done to determine differences at each time period between mothers' and fathers' reports of marital and parenting satisfaction, and parenting self-efficacy. Pearson Product Moment Correlations were done to examine relationships among marital and parenting satisfaction, and parenting self-efficacy. FINDINGS: Mothers' and fathers' marital satisfaction did not significantly change between 1 and 4 months, but significantly declined between 4 and 12 months postpartum. Both parents' parenting satisfaction significantly increased between 1 and 4 months, but did not significantly change between 4 and 12 months postpartum. Both parents' reports of parenting self-efficacy significantly increased between 1 and 4 months and again between 4 and 12 months postpartum. At all time periods, mothers reported significantly higher levels of parenting satisfaction and parenting self-efficacy than fathers. But mothers' reports of marital satisfaction did not significantly differ from fathers' at any time. Neither mothers' reports of parenting satisfaction nor their reports of parenting self-efficacy were significantly related to fathers' reports at any time. Mothers' reports of marital satisfaction were highly correlated with fathers' reports at each time period. A significant relationship was found between parenting satisfaction and parenting self-efficacy at 4 and 12 months postpartum for both mothers and fathers. For mothers, but not for fathers, there was a significant correlation between marital and parenting satisfaction at 4 and 12 months postpartum. CONCLUSIONS: New mothers' and new fathers' marital and parenting satisfaction, and their parenting self-efficacy change during the first year postpartum. Mothers' parenting self-efficacy is not related to fathers' parenting self-efficacy, and mothers' parenting satisfaction is not related to fathers' parenting satisfaction during the first year postpartum. Mothers and fathers do not seem to follow the same trajectory of change during the transition to parenthood, and parents' feelings of parenting self-efficacy and satisfaction seem to be independent of each other. This study reinforces the need for longitudinal studies of the transition and adaptation to the role of parenthood, and demonstrates the need to include new fathers in studies of transition.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:44Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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