2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152888
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Central Obesity in Young Adults
Abstract:
Predictors of Central Obesity in Young Adults
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Harrell, Joanne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title:Professor
Objective: Central, or visceral obesity is recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the insulin resistance syndrome. However, very little is known about central obesity in youth or young adults. The purpose of this study was to determine predictors of central obesity in young adults. Design: A descriptive, longitudinal cohort design. Population, Sample, Setting: Subjects were 83 young adults (87.5% white, 58.3% female) followed for ten years. Data were collected initially in 1990 when the subjects averaged 8.7 + 0.7 years of age, from 1991 - 1997, and finally, in 2001, when the subjects were 19.2 + 0.7 years of age. Subjects were from rural and urban settings across North Carolina (NC). Variables Studied: The dependant variable was central obesity (waist circumference). Longitudinal predictor variables tested were gender, race (white or non-white), body mass index (BMI) or body fat (sum of skinfolds) and lipids (total cholesterol [TC], high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], triglycerides). Methods: From 1990 - 1997, data were collected by trained research teams as part of a randomized, controlled field trial in schools across NC. Data were collected after obtaining informed consent. Height was measured with a stadiometer and weight with a calibrated balance beam scale; BMI was calculated as kg/m2. Subscapular and triceps skin folds were measured using Lange calipers, and their sum (SSF) was used in analyses as a measure of body fat.. Capillary blood was obtained for lipid analyses except for 1997, when venous blood was used. Waist circumference was measured in 2001 according to the NHANES III protocol. Data were analyzed using separate multiple regressions for each time point. The dependent variable in each was waist circumference, and independent variables were race, gender, BMI (or sum of skin folds), and lipids. Because TC and LDL-C were highly correlated (r=.92), as were BMI and sum of skin folds (r=.82), separate regressions were run for each set of variables. Findings: Mean waist circumference at age 19 was 81.0 + 11.2 cm. Central obesity, defined as a waist circumference greater than 88 cm in women and 102 cm in men, was present in 23% of subjects; there were no significant differences by gender or race. Mean BMI ranged from 17.0 in girls and 18.1 in boys at age 8 to 21.8 in girls and 22.9 in boys at age 16. BMI was greater in boys than in girls and body fat (SSF) was greater in girls than boys at each assessment. Mean SSF in girls ranged from 24.0 at age 8 to 32.9 at age 16, while mean SSF in boys was 22.1 at age 8 and 24.7 at age 16. Using separate regression models, BMI and/or SSF were the most significant predictors of waist circumference at each year. In the model with BMI, R2 ranged from .408 to .634 between 1990 and 1997, except for 1994, when mean age was 12.2. BMI was the only significant predictor every year except in 1997, when gender was also significant (p=.043). In the model with SSF, both gender and SSF were significant predictors for most years, with R2 values ranging from .395 to .706 except for .216 (in 1994). Race and lipids were never significant predictors. Conclusions: As early as age 8, either BMI or sum of skin folds is a good predictor of central obesity in young adulthood (age 19 - 20). When subjects were 8 years of age, BMI predicted 44.7% of the variance in their waist circumference at 19 - 20 years of age, and sum of skin folds predicted 41.5%. The prediction appears to be most accurate prior to or after puberty, as the predictions were weakest when the mean age of the subjects was 12 - 13 years. Implications: BMI in childhood and adolescence appears to be a good predictor of central obesity in young adults. Height and weight are commonly measured in clinical practice, and BMI, although not always calculated, is readily available. Waist circumference is accepted as a measure of central obesity in adults; however, it is difficult to measure consistently and normative values are unavailable for children. Since the future health problems associated with central obesity, including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and CVD, are now widely recognized, BMI should be routinely determined and interventions for obesity begun in childhood.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Central Obesity in Young Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152888-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Central Obesity in Young Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harrell, Joanne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Joanne_harrell@unc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Central, or visceral obesity is recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the insulin resistance syndrome. However, very little is known about central obesity in youth or young adults. The purpose of this study was to determine predictors of central obesity in young adults. Design: A descriptive, longitudinal cohort design. Population, Sample, Setting: Subjects were 83 young adults (87.5% white, 58.3% female) followed for ten years. Data were collected initially in 1990 when the subjects averaged 8.7 + 0.7 years of age, from 1991 - 1997, and finally, in 2001, when the subjects were 19.2 + 0.7 years of age. Subjects were from rural and urban settings across North Carolina (NC). Variables Studied: The dependant variable was central obesity (waist circumference). Longitudinal predictor variables tested were gender, race (white or non-white), body mass index (BMI) or body fat (sum of skinfolds) and lipids (total cholesterol [TC], high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], triglycerides). Methods: From 1990 - 1997, data were collected by trained research teams as part of a randomized, controlled field trial in schools across NC. Data were collected after obtaining informed consent. Height was measured with a stadiometer and weight with a calibrated balance beam scale; BMI was calculated as kg/m2. Subscapular and triceps skin folds were measured using Lange calipers, and their sum (SSF) was used in analyses as a measure of body fat.. Capillary blood was obtained for lipid analyses except for 1997, when venous blood was used. Waist circumference was measured in 2001 according to the NHANES III protocol. Data were analyzed using separate multiple regressions for each time point. The dependent variable in each was waist circumference, and independent variables were race, gender, BMI (or sum of skin folds), and lipids. Because TC and LDL-C were highly correlated (r=.92), as were BMI and sum of skin folds (r=.82), separate regressions were run for each set of variables. Findings: Mean waist circumference at age 19 was 81.0 + 11.2 cm. Central obesity, defined as a waist circumference greater than 88 cm in women and 102 cm in men, was present in 23% of subjects; there were no significant differences by gender or race. Mean BMI ranged from 17.0 in girls and 18.1 in boys at age 8 to 21.8 in girls and 22.9 in boys at age 16. BMI was greater in boys than in girls and body fat (SSF) was greater in girls than boys at each assessment. Mean SSF in girls ranged from 24.0 at age 8 to 32.9 at age 16, while mean SSF in boys was 22.1 at age 8 and 24.7 at age 16. Using separate regression models, BMI and/or SSF were the most significant predictors of waist circumference at each year. In the model with BMI, R2 ranged from .408 to .634 between 1990 and 1997, except for 1994, when mean age was 12.2. BMI was the only significant predictor every year except in 1997, when gender was also significant (p=.043). In the model with SSF, both gender and SSF were significant predictors for most years, with R2 values ranging from .395 to .706 except for .216 (in 1994). Race and lipids were never significant predictors. Conclusions: As early as age 8, either BMI or sum of skin folds is a good predictor of central obesity in young adulthood (age 19 - 20). When subjects were 8 years of age, BMI predicted 44.7% of the variance in their waist circumference at 19 - 20 years of age, and sum of skin folds predicted 41.5%. The prediction appears to be most accurate prior to or after puberty, as the predictions were weakest when the mean age of the subjects was 12 - 13 years. Implications: BMI in childhood and adolescence appears to be a good predictor of central obesity in young adults. Height and weight are commonly measured in clinical practice, and BMI, although not always calculated, is readily available. Waist circumference is accepted as a measure of central obesity in adults; however, it is difficult to measure consistently and normative values are unavailable for children. Since the future health problems associated with central obesity, including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and CVD, are now widely recognized, BMI should be routinely determined and interventions for obesity begun in childhood.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:53:51Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:53:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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