Moral Distress in Critical Care Nurses: Causes, Prevalence, and Implications for Nurse Leaders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152905
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Moral Distress in Critical Care Nurses: Causes, Prevalence, and Implications for Nurse Leaders
Abstract:
Moral Distress in Critical Care Nurses: Causes, Prevalence, and Implications for Nurse Leaders
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Gilliatt, Penny L., MN, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Virginia Mason Medical Center
Title:Education Specialist
21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: Retention of nurses must be at the forefront of a nurse leader's strategic plan. An estimated 40% of nurses will be >50 years old by the year 2010. There is an estimated vacancy rate of 14.6% in critical care, and a projected shortfall of 340,000 nurses by the year 2020. Moral distress is one issue in the literature impacting nurse retention. One study reported 15% of nurses had resigned a position because of moral distress. Considering this data, this study purposed to identify causes and prevalence of moral distress in critical care nurses and identify any correlation between years of experience in critical care and moral distress scores. Methods: A quantitative, descriptive, non-experimental, on-line survey design. The Moral Distress Scale (MDS) was administered to nurses from a 31-bed combination medical-surgical critical care unit (CCU) in a 300-bed urban, adult, acute tertiary care teaching hospital. Results: The survey was completed by 31 nurses (44% response rate). The 7 items with greatest intensity of moral distress fell into 3 areas. Issues surrounding end-of-life care and end-of-life decision-making (futile care) were the causes of highest moral distress, followed by inability to alleviate pain and suffering and staffing issues/inexperienced staff. No correlation between years of experience in critical care and levels of moral distress was identified. Conclusion: Moral distress is a very real phenomenon which affects the physical, mental, psychological, and ethical health of nurses. It affects retention and job satisfaction, morale, productivity, collaboration, and eventually the delivery of patient care. Nurse leaders must take the lead in addressing the issue and impact of moral distress, supporting research into causes and effective interventions, and striving to create healthy work environments for our most valuable resource?the bedside nurse.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMoral Distress in Critical Care Nurses: Causes, Prevalence, and Implications for Nurse Leadersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152905-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Moral Distress in Critical Care Nurses: Causes, Prevalence, and Implications for Nurse Leaders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gilliatt, Penny L., MN, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Virginia Mason Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Education Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Penny.Gilliatt@vmmc.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: Retention of nurses must be at the forefront of a nurse leader's strategic plan. An estimated 40% of nurses will be &gt;50 years old by the year 2010. There is an estimated vacancy rate of 14.6% in critical care, and a projected shortfall of 340,000 nurses by the year 2020. Moral distress is one issue in the literature impacting nurse retention. One study reported 15% of nurses had resigned a position because of moral distress. Considering this data, this study purposed to identify causes and prevalence of moral distress in critical care nurses and identify any correlation between years of experience in critical care and moral distress scores. Methods: A quantitative, descriptive, non-experimental, on-line survey design. The Moral Distress Scale (MDS) was administered to nurses from a 31-bed combination medical-surgical critical care unit (CCU) in a 300-bed urban, adult, acute tertiary care teaching hospital. Results: The survey was completed by 31 nurses (44% response rate). The 7 items with greatest intensity of moral distress fell into 3 areas. Issues surrounding end-of-life care and end-of-life decision-making (futile care) were the causes of highest moral distress, followed by inability to alleviate pain and suffering and staffing issues/inexperienced staff. No correlation between years of experience in critical care and levels of moral distress was identified. Conclusion: Moral distress is a very real phenomenon which affects the physical, mental, psychological, and ethical health of nurses. It affects retention and job satisfaction, morale, productivity, collaboration, and eventually the delivery of patient care. Nurse leaders must take the lead in addressing the issue and impact of moral distress, supporting research into causes and effective interventions, and striving to create healthy work environments for our most valuable resource?the bedside nurse.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:54:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:54:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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