2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152917
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Resilience among Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors
Abstract:
Resilience among Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Knowles, Amy L., PhD, RN, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:King College
Title:Assistant Professor
21st INRC [Evidence-Based Practice Presentation] Purpose: Never has the world experienced such extreme desecration as with the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in August 1945. This magnitude of destruction serves as the foundation for this disaster research. Although significant quantitative research has been completed about medical effects following radiation, the literature lacks qualitative exploration from a holistic health perspective. The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of atomic bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Methods: From ethnographic data and interviews with eight survivors who currently reside in the United States, a thematic structure was developed that depicts the essential elements of the atomic bomb experience. The narratives were explicated using Leininger's Culture Care Diversity and Universality Theory. Results: The thematic structure includes the literal destruction of the bombing, which resulted in complete desecration of the environment (including the physical health, psychological health and response effort). Individual's perspectives of the atomic bomb experience were circumscribed within the Japanese cultural context. Two ways of being in the world followed the bombing: surviving and thriving, with resilience serving as a lever, allowing for fluid movement over time across the continuum. Individuals experiencing surviving exhibited anxiety about their personal and family members' health, expressed mistrust, and felt a stigma associated with being a survivor. For those who were thriving, peace activism, overcoming and forgiveness were typically displayed. Keen sensory perceptions were universal across all participants and extreme measures of care were frequently discussed. Conclusion: Findings from this study add to disaster nursing literature and support the need to include disaster nursing in all levels of nursing education, emphasize the necessity of long-term psychosocial support following disasters, and discuss key public health messages.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResilience among Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152917-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Resilience among Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Knowles, Amy L., PhD, RN, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">King College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">alknowles@king.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Evidence-Based Practice Presentation] Purpose: Never has the world experienced such extreme desecration as with the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in August 1945. This magnitude of destruction serves as the foundation for this disaster research. Although significant quantitative research has been completed about medical effects following radiation, the literature lacks qualitative exploration from a holistic health perspective. The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of atomic bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Methods: From ethnographic data and interviews with eight survivors who currently reside in the United States, a thematic structure was developed that depicts the essential elements of the atomic bomb experience. The narratives were explicated using Leininger's Culture Care Diversity and Universality Theory. Results: The thematic structure includes the literal destruction of the bombing, which resulted in complete desecration of the environment (including the physical health, psychological health and response effort). Individual's perspectives of the atomic bomb experience were circumscribed within the Japanese cultural context. Two ways of being in the world followed the bombing: surviving and thriving, with resilience serving as a lever, allowing for fluid movement over time across the continuum. Individuals experiencing surviving exhibited anxiety about their personal and family members' health, expressed mistrust, and felt a stigma associated with being a survivor. For those who were thriving, peace activism, overcoming and forgiveness were typically displayed. Keen sensory perceptions were universal across all participants and extreme measures of care were frequently discussed. Conclusion: Findings from this study add to disaster nursing literature and support the need to include disaster nursing in all levels of nursing education, emphasize the necessity of long-term psychosocial support following disasters, and discuss key public health messages.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:55:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:55:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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