Skin-to-Skin Contact Effect on Cry Time in Preterm and Full-Term Neonates: A Report of Two Studies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152920
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Skin-to-Skin Contact Effect on Cry Time in Preterm and Full-Term Neonates: A Report of Two Studies
Abstract:
Skin-to-Skin Contact Effect on Cry Time in Preterm and Full-Term Neonates: A Report of Two Studies
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kostandy, Raouth R., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: Crying is a common response to pain in pre-term and full-term neonates. Skin-to-skin contact, in which a mother holds her diaper clad neonate skin-to-skin on her chest, is an intervention which effectively minimizes a neonate's cry response to pain. Methods: The first study was a randomized controlled trial which included 36 healthy full-term neonates aged birth to 2 days old, conducted to investigate the effects of skin-to-skin contact on cry time during and after hepatitis B vaccine intramuscular injection. Neonates were randomly assigned to two groups: Intervention, skin-to-skin contact (n = 17) and Control, standard care (n = 19). Cry time was continuously tape recorded before, during and after the injection. Results: During injection, intervention neonates had a mean cry time of 23 seconds compared to 32 seconds for controls. During recovery, intervention neonates had a mean cry time of 16 seconds compared to 72 seconds for controls. Methods: The second study which included 10 pre-term neonates aged 2 to 9 days old was a prospective randomized cross-over study to investigate the effects of skin-to-skin contact on cry time during and after heel-sticks. Infants were randomly assigned to two sequences A and B. Sequence A, day 1 the neonate was given the heel stick while being held skin-to-skin and day 2 the same neonate had heel-stick while in incubator on standard care, sequence B reversed sequence A. Neonates were videotaped before, during, and after heel-sticks. Cry times were scored from videotapes. Results: When in Skin-to-skin was compared with incubator, cry time was less during (p = .001) and after (p = .01) heel-sticks. Conclusion: Skin- to-skin contact is effective intervention on reducing cry response to painful procedures in pre-term and full-term neonates. Across nations, recommendations and guidelines are needed to provide safe application of this intervention for neonatal pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSkin-to-Skin Contact Effect on Cry Time in Preterm and Full-Term Neonates: A Report of Two Studiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152920-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Skin-to-Skin Contact Effect on Cry Time in Preterm and Full-Term Neonates: A Report of Two Studies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kostandy, Raouth R., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rk33@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: Crying is a common response to pain in pre-term and full-term neonates. Skin-to-skin contact, in which a mother holds her diaper clad neonate skin-to-skin on her chest, is an intervention which effectively minimizes a neonate's cry response to pain. Methods: The first study was a randomized controlled trial which included 36 healthy full-term neonates aged birth to 2 days old, conducted to investigate the effects of skin-to-skin contact on cry time during and after hepatitis B vaccine intramuscular injection. Neonates were randomly assigned to two groups: Intervention, skin-to-skin contact (n = 17) and Control, standard care (n = 19). Cry time was continuously tape recorded before, during and after the injection. Results: During injection, intervention neonates had a mean cry time of 23 seconds compared to 32 seconds for controls. During recovery, intervention neonates had a mean cry time of 16 seconds compared to 72 seconds for controls. Methods: The second study which included 10 pre-term neonates aged 2 to 9 days old was a prospective randomized cross-over study to investigate the effects of skin-to-skin contact on cry time during and after heel-sticks. Infants were randomly assigned to two sequences A and B. Sequence A, day 1 the neonate was given the heel stick while being held skin-to-skin and day 2 the same neonate had heel-stick while in incubator on standard care, sequence B reversed sequence A. Neonates were videotaped before, during, and after heel-sticks. Cry times were scored from videotapes. Results: When in Skin-to-skin was compared with incubator, cry time was less during (p = .001) and after (p = .01) heel-sticks. Conclusion: Skin- to-skin contact is effective intervention on reducing cry response to painful procedures in pre-term and full-term neonates. Across nations, recommendations and guidelines are needed to provide safe application of this intervention for neonatal pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:55:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:55:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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