2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152929
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Decision-Making of Nurses Regarding Elder Abuse
Abstract:
Clinical Decision-Making of Nurses Regarding Elder Abuse
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Meeks Sjostrom, Diana J., PhD, RN, MSN, FNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Bauder College
Title:Director of Nursing
21st INRC [Evidence-Based Practice Presentation] A descriptive correlational design based on an adapted model of Donabedian's Structure, Process, Outcome model and Benner's Novice to Expert theory was used to examine the clinical decision-making of nurses regarding elder abuse. The relationship of the nurses applied knowledge (assessment cues) of elder abuse; demographic questions (e.g. years of experience as a Registered Nurse (RN) and their clinical level of practice status), the use of intuition in nursing practice; and clinical decision outcomes (interventions) for patients in cases of suspected elder abuse was examined. A convenience sample of RNs who worked in the emergency department (ED) in three acute care hospitals, in southeastern United States were asked to complete questionnaires on education about elder abuse, their intuition use, demographic information, applied knowledge of elder abuse, and clinical decision outcomes for suspected elder abuse. The t-test revealed there was no difference (applied knowledge (assessment cues) of elder abuse, intuition use in nursing, years working as a RN, clinical level of practice status, and clinical decision outcomes (interventions)) between RNs who received elder abuse education at orientation and those who did not receive the education. The study results suggest that years of working as a nurse supported elder abuse recognition and intervention. The clinical level of practice status of nurses was found not to be a sensitive indicator. Elder abuse education during orientation varied between the hospital settings. The results indicate the educational need for nurses regarding suspected elder abuse. By educating student nurses on this information during their nursing programs, their clinical decision-making regarding elder abuse can be improved.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Decision-Making of Nurses Regarding Elder Abuseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152929-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Clinical Decision-Making of Nurses Regarding Elder Abuse</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Meeks Sjostrom, Diana J., PhD, RN, MSN, FNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bauder College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sjomee@att.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Evidence-Based Practice Presentation] A descriptive correlational design based on an adapted model of Donabedian's Structure, Process, Outcome model and Benner's Novice to Expert theory was used to examine the clinical decision-making of nurses regarding elder abuse. The relationship of the nurses applied knowledge (assessment cues) of elder abuse; demographic questions (e.g. years of experience as a Registered Nurse (RN) and their clinical level of practice status), the use of intuition in nursing practice; and clinical decision outcomes (interventions) for patients in cases of suspected elder abuse was examined. A convenience sample of RNs who worked in the emergency department (ED) in three acute care hospitals, in southeastern United States were asked to complete questionnaires on education about elder abuse, their intuition use, demographic information, applied knowledge of elder abuse, and clinical decision outcomes for suspected elder abuse. The t-test revealed there was no difference (applied knowledge (assessment cues) of elder abuse, intuition use in nursing, years working as a RN, clinical level of practice status, and clinical decision outcomes (interventions)) between RNs who received elder abuse education at orientation and those who did not receive the education. The study results suggest that years of working as a nurse supported elder abuse recognition and intervention. The clinical level of practice status of nurses was found not to be a sensitive indicator. Elder abuse education during orientation varied between the hospital settings. The results indicate the educational need for nurses regarding suspected elder abuse. By educating student nurses on this information during their nursing programs, their clinical decision-making regarding elder abuse can be improved.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:55:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:55:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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