2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152967
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Media 101: More than Social Networking
Abstract:
Social Media 101: More than Social Networking
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Brixey, Juliana J., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:James P. Turley PhD, RN, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify social networking tools and technologies suitable for use in nursing and biomedical informatics education. Social Media is gaining acceptance by educators to deliver course content, create health care simulations, develop informatics literacy skills, and encourage the development of lasting professional connections for graduate students. Although Web 2.0 implies a newer version of the internet, it is actually the way software developers and users interact and use internet-based tools and technologies. Web 2.0 technologies support ubiquitous computing. The user no longer relies on software installed on a computer but can access the application on any computer using a web browser. Social media is social in the fact that the tools and technologies link people together as active contributors who customize internet content and applications. The purpose of this study is to identify social networking tools and technologies suitable for use in nursing and biomedical informatics education. Methods:  A review of the internet was conducted using the search phrases "Web 2.0", "education", and "social media". Results: Some of the best known social media includes:  blogs, microblogging, videoblogs, wikis, podcasting, social networking, social book marking, RSS feeds, folksonomies, SMS (Small Message Service), and virtual worlds. Conclusion: There are many social media applications available for use in nursing and biomedical informatics education. Social media can be used to help develop competencies in computer and informatics literacy. Furthermore social media can be used to foster lasting professional collegial connections and networks for graduate students Social media. It is imperative that today's nurse educator be familiar with social media, the implications for use in education, and the need to critically evaluate any application before introducing into the classroom.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Media 101: More than Social Networkingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152967-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Social Media 101: More than Social Networking</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brixey, Juliana J., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Juliana.j.Brixey@uth.tmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">James P. Turley PhD, RN, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose:&nbsp;The purpose of this study is to identify social networking tools and technologies suitable for use in nursing and biomedical informatics education. Social Media is gaining acceptance by educators to deliver course content, create health care simulations, develop informatics literacy skills, and encourage the development of lasting professional connections for graduate students. Although Web 2.0 implies a newer version of the internet, it is actually the way software developers and users interact and use internet-based tools and technologies. Web 2.0 technologies support ubiquitous computing. The user no longer relies on software installed on a computer but can access the application on any computer using a web browser. Social media is social in the fact that the tools and technologies link people together as active contributors who customize internet content and applications. The purpose of this study is to identify social networking tools and technologies suitable for use in nursing and biomedical informatics education. Methods:&nbsp;&nbsp;A review of the internet was conducted using the search phrases &quot;Web 2.0&quot;, &quot;education&quot;, and &quot;social media&quot;. Results:&nbsp;Some of the best known social media includes:&nbsp; blogs,&nbsp;microblogging,&nbsp;videoblogs,&nbsp;wikis, podcasting, social networking,&nbsp;social book marking,&nbsp;RSS feeds,&nbsp;folksonomies,&nbsp;SMS (Small Message Service), and virtual worlds. Conclusion:&nbsp;There are many social media applications available for use in nursing and biomedical informatics education. Social media can be used to help develop competencies in computer and informatics literacy. Furthermore social media can be used to foster lasting professional collegial connections and networks for graduate students Social media. It is imperative that today's nurse educator be familiar with social media, the implications for use in education, and the need to critically evaluate any application before introducing into the classroom.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:57:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:57:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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