Sleep Disorders are Associated with HbA1c and Glycemia in Undetected Diabetic Mexican Police Officers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153016
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep Disorders are Associated with HbA1c and Glycemia in Undetected Diabetic Mexican Police Officers
Abstract:
Sleep Disorders are Associated with HbA1c and Glycemia in Undetected Diabetic Mexican Police Officers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Marquez-Gamino, Sergio, MD, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Universidad de Guanajuato Campus Leon
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Cipriana Caudillo-Cisneros RN, MS, Directora
Lourdes Espinosa-Hernandez PSIC, Assistance Research Scientist
Karla S. Vera-Delgado RN, MSc, Associate Professor
Carol M. Baldwin PhD, RN, AHN-BC, FAAN, Associate Professor
[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose: Sleep is essential for healthy physiological functioning and life. Sleep disorders (SD), including most problems in sleep behavior, have been implicated in the development of chronic diseases. In order to achieve its implicit security goals, police officers are entailed to continuous shift works. Our aim was to search association of SD and risk factors for type 2 diabetes in Mexican police officers.
Methods: A group of 55 police officers underwent anthropometric assessment, blood glucose and glycosilated hemoglobin (HbA1c) determinations. SD were evaluated using the Sleep Heart Health Study Sleep Habits Questionary (SHQ), and Spanish-language validated for use with Mexican Americans an Mexicans. Descriptive statistics and X square were performed to examine association between SD and risk factors of type 2 diabetes, 95% CI.
Results: Mean age of the sample was 32 +/- 8 years. 30.9% of participants reported SD; 70.9% snoring; 9.1% reported witnessed apnea during sleep; 21.8% reported urgency to move the legs sometime during the last year, and 18.2% unpleasant or uncomfortable sensations in the legs. Although no one reported having diabetes, 32 (58%) of participants had HbA1c values greater than 6%. Mean Hb1Ac was 8.52% (4.3-13.9%). 12 h fasting glycaemia mean value was 100 +/- 28 mg/dl. The X square analysis showed associations between DS, glucose and HbA1c (p=0.0001).
Conclusion: 
SD showed significant associations with glucose and HbA1c. Although not diagnosed diabetics, 58% of the police officers had elevated HbA1c. These findings reinforce the importance of establishing prevention and control measures to be performed by the nursing team in this occupational group. In addition to the multiple risk factors inherent in public security work, police and their shift work may be associated with high risk for metabolic disease.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep Disorders are Associated with HbA1c and Glycemia in Undetected Diabetic Mexican Police Officersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153016-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sleep Disorders are Associated with HbA1c and Glycemia in Undetected Diabetic Mexican Police Officers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Marquez-Gamino, Sergio, MD, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Universidad de Guanajuato Campus Leon</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smgamino@gmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cipriana Caudillo-Cisneros RN, MS, Directora<br/>Lourdes Espinosa-Hernandez PSIC, Assistance Research Scientist<br/>Karla S. Vera-Delgado RN, MSc, Associate Professor<br/>Carol M. Baldwin PhD, RN, AHN-BC, FAAN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose: Sleep is essential for healthy physiological functioning and life. Sleep disorders (SD), including most problems in sleep behavior, have been implicated in the development of chronic diseases. In order to achieve its implicit security goals, police officers are entailed to continuous shift works. Our aim was to search association of SD and risk factors for type 2 diabetes in Mexican police officers.<br/>Methods: A group of 55 police officers underwent anthropometric assessment, blood glucose and glycosilated hemoglobin (HbA1c) determinations. SD were evaluated using the Sleep Heart Health Study Sleep Habits Questionary (SHQ), and Spanish-language validated for use with Mexican Americans an Mexicans. Descriptive statistics and X square were performed to examine association between SD and risk factors of type 2 diabetes, 95% CI. <br/>Results: Mean age of the sample was 32 +/- 8 years. 30.9% of participants reported SD; 70.9% snoring; 9.1% reported witnessed apnea during sleep; 21.8%&nbsp;reported urgency to move the legs sometime during the last year, and 18.2% unpleasant or uncomfortable sensations in the legs. Although no one reported having diabetes, 32 (58%) of participants had HbA1c values greater than 6%. Mean Hb1Ac was 8.52% (4.3-13.9%). 12 h fasting glycaemia mean value was 100 +/- 28 mg/dl. The X square analysis showed associations between DS, glucose and HbA1c (p=0.0001).<br/>Conclusion:&nbsp;<br/>SD showed significant associations with glucose and HbA1c. Although not diagnosed diabetics, 58% of the police officers had elevated HbA1c. These findings reinforce the importance of establishing prevention and control measures to be performed by the nursing team in this occupational group. In addition to the multiple risk factors inherent&nbsp;in public security work, police&nbsp;and&nbsp;their shift work&nbsp;may be associated with&nbsp;high risk for metabolic disease.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:59:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:59:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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