2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153051
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Contextualizing Stress in Preterm Birth: Implications for Research
Abstract:
Contextualizing Stress in Preterm Birth: Implications for Research
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Thomas, Joycelyn, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Research Nurse
Co-Authors:Doris Boutain, PhD, RN; Kathleen Paul; Jane Hitti, MD, MPH
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Background: Preterm birth (PTB) remains the leading cause of neonatal mortality in the United States. Although PTB is often associated with stress, studies are needed to understand how women view stress. The purpose of this study was to critically explore what women viewed as contributants to their PTB experience. Sample: White-American (n=75) and African-American (n=20) women residents of King County, WA were enrolled in the study. Most women had a prior pregnancy 1 year before enrollment. White-American women were slightly older (35 +/- 6) than African-American women (30 +/- 6). African American women had lower median household incomes (22,000) compared with White American women (95,000). Methods: One home based interview was conducted with each woman and lasted approximately one hour. Women also completed demographic and psychosocial stress questionnaires. Verbatim interview transcripts were analyzed using both content and critical discourse analysis. Results: The details of women's stress experiences revealed how socioeconomic status constructed accounts. Many women from high income backgrounds discussed stressors associated with changing homes, jobs or other lifestyles changes. Women from low income backgrounds detailed how they had multiple obligations relating to basic needs for self health, housing and care of kin. Implications: This study describes how women shaped accounts about PTB in light of economic, family and knowledge resource availability. Prior studies of maternal stress rarely analyzed women's accounts of stress within the context of socioeconomic privilege and vulnerability. Although these results appear logical, stress research rarely identifies how the socioeconomic status of high income women shape their views of stress during pregnancy. Attending to all stress accounts reveals the subtle ways stress research can implicitly privilege the most privileged if the details of stress accounts are not analyzed as a study focus. Funding: National Institute for Child and Human Health Development (NICHD) R01 HD41682-01.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleContextualizing Stress in Preterm Birth: Implications for Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153051-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Contextualizing Stress in Preterm Birth: Implications for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thomas, Joycelyn, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joycelyn@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Doris Boutain, PhD, RN; Kathleen Paul; Jane Hitti, MD, MPH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Background: Preterm birth (PTB) remains the leading cause of neonatal mortality in the United States. Although PTB is often associated with stress, studies are needed to understand how women view stress. The purpose of this study was to critically explore what women viewed as contributants to their PTB experience. Sample: White-American (n=75) and African-American (n=20) women residents of King County, WA were enrolled in the study. Most women had a prior pregnancy 1 year before enrollment. White-American women were slightly older (35 +/- 6) than African-American women (30 +/- 6). African American women had lower median household incomes (22,000) compared with White American women (95,000). Methods: One home based interview was conducted with each woman and lasted approximately one hour. Women also completed demographic and psychosocial stress questionnaires. Verbatim interview transcripts were analyzed using both content and critical discourse analysis. Results: The details of women's stress experiences revealed how socioeconomic status constructed accounts. Many women from high income backgrounds discussed stressors associated with changing homes, jobs or other lifestyles changes. Women from low income backgrounds detailed how they had multiple obligations relating to basic needs for self health, housing and care of kin. Implications: This study describes how women shaped accounts about PTB in light of economic, family and knowledge resource availability. Prior studies of maternal stress rarely analyzed women's accounts of stress within the context of socioeconomic privilege and vulnerability. Although these results appear logical, stress research rarely identifies how the socioeconomic status of high income women shape their views of stress during pregnancy. Attending to all stress accounts reveals the subtle ways stress research can implicitly privilege the most privileged if the details of stress accounts are not analyzed as a study focus. Funding: National Institute for Child and Human Health Development (NICHD) R01 HD41682-01.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:00:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:00:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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