Do Measures of Self-Regulatory Dispositions Relate to Nursing Students' Clinical Reasoning Competencies in a Simulated Clinical Setting?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153079
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do Measures of Self-Regulatory Dispositions Relate to Nursing Students' Clinical Reasoning Competencies in a Simulated Clinical Setting?
Abstract:
Do Measures of Self-Regulatory Dispositions Relate to Nursing Students' Clinical Reasoning Competencies in a Simulated Clinical Setting?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Cantwell, Robert H., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Newcastle
Title:Senior Lecturer
Co-Authors:Krystyna M. Cholowski, PhD, RN
[Research Presentation] Purpose: In this study, we examine the influence of existing metacognitive beliefs on the planning and strategy choices of pre-service nurses when faced with a simulated clinical task. Metacognitive belief - as a form of prior knowledge, acts as an internal reference point whenever self-regulating activity is required. It is reasonable to predict, then, that how pre-service nurses choose to engage with a complex and open-ended clinical task will reflect pre-existing conceptions of how to approach clinical tasks (analogous to an approach to learning (Biggs, 1993)) and how to actively self-regulate strategy choices in the completion of that task (Cantwell & Moore, 1996). Methods:  87 final year undergraduate nursing students completed a simulated clinical task relating to the conduct of a pre-operative clinical interview and assessment. Two self-report questionnaires relating to aspects of metacognitive beliefs were completed: Biggs' (1987) "Study Process Questionnaire", a measure of dispositional motivational and strategy choices in learning (surface, deep and achieving approaches), and Cantwell and Moore's (1996) "Strategic Flexibility Questionnaire", a measure of disposition towards active or passive self-regulation (adaptive, inflexible or irresolute regulation). The clinical interview was completed in three phases: a "Planning" phase in which students gave written responses to five aspects of the pre-interview planning; a "Note-taking" phase in which students generated case notes whilst viewing a simulated interview; and a "Clinical Reasoning" component in which students generated a "Mental Status Assessment" and four Nursing Diagnoses. Data from each phase were analysed against expert templates. Results:  Analyses indicated that a disposition towards active and coherent self-regulation, combined with a disposition towards meaning construction (deep processing) as opposed to symptom reproduction (surface processing), was associated with higher quality performance across all phases of the clinical task. Conclusion: The results of the study are discussed in relation to both attributes of developing expertise and instructional implications.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo Measures of Self-Regulatory Dispositions Relate to Nursing Students' Clinical Reasoning Competencies in a Simulated Clinical Setting?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153079-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Do Measures of Self-Regulatory Dispositions Relate to Nursing Students' Clinical Reasoning Competencies in a Simulated Clinical Setting?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cantwell, Robert H., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Newcastle</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">robert.cantwelL@newcastle.edu.au</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Krystyna M. Cholowski, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: In this study, we examine the influence of existing metacognitive beliefs on the planning and strategy choices of pre-service nurses when faced with a simulated clinical task. Metacognitive belief - as a form of prior knowledge, acts as an internal reference point whenever self-regulating activity is required. It is reasonable to predict, then, that how pre-service nurses choose to engage with a complex and open-ended clinical task will reflect pre-existing conceptions of how to approach clinical tasks (analogous to an approach to learning (Biggs, 1993)) and how to actively self-regulate strategy choices in the completion of that task (Cantwell &amp; Moore, 1996). Methods: &nbsp;87 final year undergraduate nursing students completed a simulated clinical task relating to the conduct of a pre-operative clinical interview and assessment. Two self-report questionnaires relating to aspects of metacognitive beliefs were completed: Biggs' (1987) &quot;Study Process Questionnaire&quot;, a measure of dispositional motivational and strategy choices in learning (surface, deep and achieving approaches), and Cantwell and Moore's (1996) &quot;Strategic Flexibility Questionnaire&quot;, a measure of disposition towards active or passive self-regulation (adaptive, inflexible or irresolute regulation). The clinical interview was completed in three phases: a &quot;Planning&quot; phase in which students gave written responses to five aspects of the pre-interview planning; a &quot;Note-taking&quot; phase in which students generated case notes whilst viewing a simulated interview; and a &quot;Clinical Reasoning&quot; component in which students generated a &quot;Mental Status Assessment&quot; and four Nursing Diagnoses. Data from each phase were analysed against expert templates. Results: &nbsp;Analyses indicated that a disposition towards active and coherent self-regulation, combined with a disposition towards meaning construction (deep processing) as opposed to symptom reproduction (surface processing), was associated with higher quality performance across all phases of the clinical task. Conclusion: The results of the study are discussed in relation to both attributes of developing expertise and instructional implications.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:01:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:01:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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