Self-Efficacy and Social Support in Urban Jamaican Women's Negotiation of Safer Sex Behaviors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153098
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Efficacy and Social Support in Urban Jamaican Women's Negotiation of Safer Sex Behaviors
Abstract:
Self-Efficacy and Social Support in Urban Jamaican Women's Negotiation of Safer Sex Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Genus, Jennifer M., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Broward College
Title:Assistant Professor
[Research Presentation] Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between urban Jamaican women's general self-efficacy, social support, and negotiation of safer sex behaviors. Four hypotheses determined the relationships of general self-efficacy to social support, general self-efficacy to safer sex behaviors, social support to safer sex behaviors, and the contributions of general self-efficacy and social support to negotiation of safer sex behaviors. Methods: For this quantitative cross-sectional study, a convenience sample of 447 women was surveyed from two cities in Jamaica. The General Self-Efficacy Scale, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, the Safe Sex Behavior Questionnaire, and a researcher-designed demographic questionnaire were used to collect data over 2 weeks in community settings women frequent. Descriptive statistics were employed to describe the sample, and the hypotheses were tested with Pearson product-moment correlations and hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Results: A modest but positive relationship was found between urban Jamaican women's general self-efficacy and social support (r = .33, p < .01). A modest but positive correlation was found between urban Jamaican women's general self-efficacy and negotiation of safer sex behavior (r = .26, p < .01). A weak but positive relationship was found between urban Jamaican women's social support and negotiation of safer sex behavior (r = .09, p < .05). For the independent and combined contributions of general self-efficacy and social support to negotiation of safer sex behavior, general self-efficacy  provided a significant contribution (p = .000) but social support did not (p = .943). Conclusion: Study results contribute empirical evidence of the role of general self-efficacy, but not social support, toward the design of effective preventive interventions to help urban Jamaican women practice safer sex behaviors. Interventions aimed at increasing general self-efficacy may help reduce their risks and incidence of HIV/AIDS.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Efficacy and Social Support in Urban Jamaican Women's Negotiation of Safer Sex Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153098-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Efficacy and Social Support in Urban Jamaican Women's Negotiation of Safer Sex Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Genus, Jennifer M., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Broward College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jgenus@bellsouth.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between urban Jamaican women's general self-efficacy, social support, and negotiation of safer sex behaviors. Four hypotheses determined the relationships of general self-efficacy to social support, general self-efficacy to safer sex behaviors, social support to safer sex behaviors, and the contributions of general self-efficacy and social support to negotiation of safer sex behaviors. Methods: For this quantitative cross-sectional study, a convenience sample of 447 women was surveyed from two cities in Jamaica. The General Self-Efficacy Scale, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, the Safe Sex Behavior Questionnaire, and a researcher-designed demographic questionnaire were used to collect data over 2 weeks in community settings women frequent. Descriptive statistics were employed to describe the sample, and the hypotheses were tested with Pearson product-moment correlations and hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Results: A modest but positive relationship was found between urban Jamaican women's general self-efficacy and social support (r = .33, p &lt; .01). A modest but positive correlation was found between urban Jamaican women's general self-efficacy and negotiation of safer sex behavior (r = .26, p &lt; .01). A weak but positive relationship was found between urban Jamaican women's social support and negotiation of safer sex behavior (r = .09, p &lt; .05). For the independent and combined contributions of general self-efficacy and social support to negotiation of safer sex behavior, general self-efficacy&nbsp; provided a significant contribution (p = .000) but social support did not (p = .943). Conclusion: Study results contribute empirical evidence of the role of general self-efficacy, but not social support, toward the design of effective preventive interventions to help urban Jamaican women practice safer sex behaviors. Interventions aimed at increasing general self-efficacy may help reduce their risks and incidence of HIV/AIDS.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:02:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:02:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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