Exploring Latent Cancer/Cardiac Risk Clusters in Alcohol, Smoking, and Obesity in Postmenopausal Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153103
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Latent Cancer/Cardiac Risk Clusters in Alcohol, Smoking, and Obesity in Postmenopausal Women
Abstract:
Exploring Latent Cancer/Cardiac Risk Clusters in Alcohol, Smoking, and Obesity in Postmenopausal Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Hardie, Thomas, EdD, RN, CS, NP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Delaware
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Carolee Ann Polek, PhD, RN; Erlinda C. Wheeler, DNS, RN
[Research Presentation] Purpose: Alcohol use, smoking tobacco, and obesity have all been established as risks for developing cancers and heart disease. Recent finding indicate that post menopausal women having "even moderate alcohol consumption, defined as one or two drinks per day" increase their risk of developing the most common form of breast cancer by 51%.  The purpose of this study is to describe current levels of known breast cancer and heart disease risks in a nationally representative sample and develop risk profiles derived by traditional clustering methods and latent class analysis (clusters). Understanding the prevalence and how these risks interact will inform targeted prevention and research.  Methods:  Data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey was analyzed to assess the prevalence of drinking, smoking and being overweight/obese in women between the ages of 50 and 69 ( N=3750).  K-mean clusters and Latent class analysis (LCA) using  levels of alcohol use, tobacco use and obesity were used to develop patient clusters. Results: Of drinking women, 11.4% are consuming alcohol at unhealthy levels, 18% are smoking and 65.6% are overweight/obese.  A three cluster (LCA) solution was the most appropriate fitting model which provides a more comprehensive picture of the co-morbidity in these risks. These clusters may provide demographic profiles for targeted interventions. Conclusion: Clustering either by traditional methods or LCA offers a method of comparing obese, abstinent smokers with the alcohol using, non-smoking  average weight women.  Findings from this project will allow the nurse to use demographic profiles associated with risk clusters in developing targeted prevention and screening research.  The advantages and disadvantages of using and selecting various clustering methods will be presented.  For example, this observational study provides population level risk data but is censored.  Some of the most severely impacted women may not be in the survey due to hospitalization or death.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Latent Cancer/Cardiac Risk Clusters in Alcohol, Smoking, and Obesity in Postmenopausal Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153103-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring Latent Cancer/Cardiac Risk Clusters in Alcohol, Smoking, and Obesity in Postmenopausal Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hardie, Thomas, EdD, RN, CS, NP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Delaware</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">thardie@udel.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carolee Ann Polek, PhD, RN; Erlinda C. Wheeler, DNS, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: Alcohol use, smoking tobacco, and obesity have all been established as risks for developing cancers and heart disease. Recent finding indicate that post menopausal women having &quot;even moderate alcohol consumption, defined as one or two drinks per day&quot; increase their risk of developing the most common form of breast cancer by 51%.&nbsp; The purpose of this study is to describe current levels of known breast cancer and heart disease risks in a nationally representative sample and develop risk profiles derived by traditional clustering methods and latent class analysis (clusters). Understanding the prevalence and how these risks interact will inform targeted prevention and research.&nbsp; Methods: &nbsp;Data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey was analyzed to assess the prevalence of&nbsp;drinking, smoking and being overweight/obese in women between the ages of 50 and 69 ( N=3750).&nbsp; K-mean clusters and Latent class analysis (LCA)&nbsp;using&nbsp; levels of alcohol use, tobacco use and obesity were used to develop patient clusters. Results: Of drinking women, 11.4% are consuming alcohol at unhealthy levels, 18% are smoking and 65.6% are overweight/obese.&nbsp; A three cluster (LCA) solution was the most appropriate fitting model which provides a more comprehensive picture of the co-morbidity in these risks. These clusters may&nbsp;provide demographic profiles for targeted interventions. Conclusion: Clustering either by traditional methods or LCA offers a method of comparing obese, abstinent smokers with the alcohol using, non-smoking&nbsp; average weight women.&nbsp; Findings from this project will allow the nurse to use demographic profiles associated with risk clusters in developing targeted prevention and screening research. &nbsp;The advantages and disadvantages of using and selecting various clustering methods will be presented.&nbsp; For example, this observational study provides population level risk data but is censored.&nbsp; Some of the most severely impacted women may not be in the survey due to hospitalization or death.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:02:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:02:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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