Relationships among Pain Intensity, Pain Interference, Pain Beliefs, and the Dosage of Analgesics Used by Patients Receiving PCA after Spinal Surgery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153140
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationships among Pain Intensity, Pain Interference, Pain Beliefs, and the Dosage of Analgesics Used by Patients Receiving PCA after Spinal Surgery
Abstract:
Relationships among Pain Intensity, Pain Interference, Pain Beliefs, and the Dosage of Analgesics Used by Patients Receiving PCA after Spinal Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Chang, Ling-Hua, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Taichung Armed Force General Hospital* , National Taipei College of Nursing**
Title:Director of nursing department
21st INRC [Evidence-Based Practice Presentation] Background: Patients often suffer from severe pain after spinal surgery. Most patients received patient-controlled analgesia after spinal surgery in recent years. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among pain intensity, pain interference, pain beliefs, and the dosage of analgesics used of patients receiving patient-controlled analgesia after spinal surgery. Methods: A cross-sectional correlational design and convenient sampling were applied in this study. One hundred and four subjects were chosen from one orthopedic ward in a region medical teaching hospital in middle of Taiwan. Subjects received structured questionnaire by using the American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire-Modified (APS-POQ- Modified), which including subscales of pain intensity, pain interference, and pain beliefs. Results: The results showed that (1) patients experienced lower "average pain intensity" and moderate "worst pain intensity" on the third postoperative day, (2) patients experienced lower to moderate pain interference on the third postoperative day, (3) the dosage of analgesics used during the 3 days postoperatively was 57.75 mg (SD = 19.09) converting to morphine dose equivalent, (4) the scores of pain beliefs were significant negatively related to the dosage of analgesics used but were positively related to pain intensity and pain interference, (5) the pain interference with general activity mediated between pain intensity and the dosage of analgesics used during the 3 days postoperatively, and the Goodman version of the Sobel test further demonstrated that approximately 92.94% variation was mediated. Conclusions: Therefore, education about pain management and reducing pain interference are considered to be important to improve the effectiveness of the management of postoperative pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationships among Pain Intensity, Pain Interference, Pain Beliefs, and the Dosage of Analgesics Used by Patients Receiving PCA after Spinal Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153140-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationships among Pain Intensity, Pain Interference, Pain Beliefs, and the Dosage of Analgesics Used by Patients Receiving PCA after Spinal Surgery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chang, Ling-Hua, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Taichung Armed Force General Hospital* , National Taipei College of Nursing**</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of nursing department</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">linghua531028@gmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Evidence-Based Practice Presentation] Background: Patients often suffer from severe pain after spinal surgery. Most patients received patient-controlled analgesia after spinal surgery in recent years. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among pain intensity, pain interference, pain beliefs, and the dosage of analgesics used of patients receiving patient-controlled analgesia after spinal surgery. Methods: A cross-sectional correlational design and convenient sampling were applied in this study. One hundred and four subjects were chosen from one orthopedic ward in a region medical teaching hospital in middle of Taiwan. Subjects received structured questionnaire by using the American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire-Modified (APS-POQ- Modified), which including subscales of pain intensity, pain interference, and pain beliefs. Results: The results showed that (1) patients experienced lower &quot;average pain intensity&quot; and moderate &quot;worst pain intensity&quot; on the third postoperative day, (2) patients experienced lower to moderate pain interference on the third postoperative day, (3) the dosage of analgesics used during the 3 days postoperatively was 57.75 mg (SD = 19.09) converting to morphine dose equivalent, (4) the scores of pain beliefs were significant negatively related to the dosage of analgesics used but were positively related to pain intensity and pain interference, (5) the pain interference with general activity mediated between pain intensity and the dosage of analgesics used during the 3 days postoperatively, and the Goodman version of the Sobel test further demonstrated that approximately 92.94% variation was mediated. Conclusions: Therefore, education about pain management and reducing pain interference are considered to be important to improve the effectiveness of the management of postoperative pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:04:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:04:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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