2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153166
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Users' Guide to Knowledge Translation Theories/Frameworks
Abstract:
A Users' Guide to Knowledge Translation Theories/Frameworks
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Logan, Jo F., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Ottawa
Title:Adjunct Professor
Co-Authors:Ian D. Graham, PhD; Jacqueline M. Tetroe, MA and Nicole J.T. Robinson, BA(Hon)
[Research Presentation] Purpose and Background: There is an interesting contradiction in implementation research. While many implementation trials are uninformed by theory, at the same time, there would appear to be an alarming number of theories extant in the peer reviewed literature. We were interested in identifying relevant theories and "unpacking" their concepts so as to be able to find the commonalities between them as well as to identify the full range of components thought to be important for successful implementation. The purpose of the research was to conduct a focused search for conceptual models, frameworks, and grand theories of knowledge transfer (planned change); to undertake a theory analysis to determine: their strengths and limitations; similarities and differences between them; the extent to which each theory has been used and/or tested and the contexts and populations in which it has been used and/or tested; and to produce a users-guide to the theories. Methods: We conducted a focused literature search, developed inclusion criteria to identify planned action theories and then extracted data from each theory to determine the origins; examine the meaning; judge the logical consistency; define the degree of generalizability and parsimony and testability. We conducted an analysis of the concepts found in each theory and used that to develop a set of action categories that form the phases of planned action. Results: We identified 31 planned action theories that formed the basis of our analyses. The phases of planned action from each theory were synthesized into 10 distinct, but related categories. We created an Access Database containing an inventory of planned change models, frameworks/grand theories and a KT Theories User's Guide which synthesizes all the planned change models/theories; identifies common elements of each and provides information on their use.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Users' Guide to Knowledge Translation Theories/Frameworksen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153166-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Users' Guide to Knowledge Translation Theories/Frameworks</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Logan, Jo F., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Ottawa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adjunct Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jlogan@uottawa.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ian D. Graham, PhD; Jacqueline M. Tetroe, MA and Nicole J.T. Robinson, BA(Hon)</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose and Background: There is an interesting contradiction in implementation research. While many implementation trials are uninformed by theory, at the same time, there would appear to be an alarming number of theories extant in the peer reviewed literature. We were interested in identifying relevant theories and &quot;unpacking&quot; their concepts so as to be able to find the commonalities between them as well as to identify the full range of components thought to be important for successful implementation. The purpose of the research was to conduct a focused search for conceptual models, frameworks, and grand theories of knowledge transfer (planned change); to undertake a theory analysis to determine: their strengths and limitations; similarities and differences between them; the extent to which each theory has been used and/or tested and the contexts and populations in which it has been used and/or tested; and to produce a users-guide to the theories. Methods: We conducted a focused literature search, developed inclusion criteria to identify planned action theories and then extracted data from each theory to determine the origins; examine the meaning; judge the logical consistency; define the degree of generalizability and parsimony and testability. We conducted an analysis of the concepts found in each theory and used that to develop a set of action categories that form the phases of planned action. Results: We identified 31 planned action theories that formed the basis of our analyses. The phases of planned action from each theory were synthesized into 10 distinct, but related categories. We created an Access Database containing an inventory of planned change models, frameworks/grand theories and a KT Theories User's Guide which synthesizes all the planned change models/theories; identifies common elements of each and provides information on their use.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:05:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:05:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.